Texas Medicaid Rolls Grow Even Without Expansion

first_imgMore than 80,000 Texans have enrolled in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program since the rollout of the Affordable Care Act last fall, despite the state’s decision not to participate in the health law’s expansion of eligibility. Enrollment and marketplace developments in Colorado and Maryland are also tracked.The Texas Tribune: Texas Sees Rise In Medicaid Sign-UpsMore than 80,000 additional Texans have enrolled in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program since the rollout of the Affordable Care Act last fall despite Republican state leaders’ decision not to expand eligibility to poor adults, according to federal figures. The 80,435 new enrollees as of May — mostly Texans who already qualified for coverage but did not previously seek it — represent a 1.8 percent increase over pre-Obamacare figures (Okun, 7/15).Houston Chronicle: Even Without Expansion, Texas Medicaid Rolls Rise[Rosa] Ruiz’ children are among a flood of Texans who joined the Medicaid rolls this year after long being eligible without knowing it. A new report shows the number of state residents on Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP, grew by more than 80,000 between last summer and this May, a 1.8 percent spike, despite the Legislature’s decision to reject the expansion of Medicaid under the federal Affordable Care Act. Overall, 4.52 million Texans now are on one of the federal programs, according to the report from the national Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Most are children (Rosenthal, 7/15).Health News Colorado: Double-Enrollment Snafu: Who’s On The Hook For ‘Million Dollar’ Claims?Colorado’s Medicaid and health exchange managers simultaneously enrolled about 3,000 people in both public and private health insurance, creating confusion over who will pay claims that could approach $1 million per person for high-cost patients. The problem is also beginning to emerge around the country, and Colorado officials used the weekend meeting of the National Governor’s Association in Tennessee to plead for help from federal health officials to halt the potentially costly double enrollments. Colorado’s Medicaid Director Sue Birch tried to downplay the problem during a health exchange board meeting on Monday. She said she has identified the people who are double enrolled, is “minimizing the financial magnitude” of the problem and is ensuring that patients are getting care (McCrimmon, 7/15). The Associated Press: Md. Officials Provide Update On Health ExchangeA computer glitch with Connecticut’s health exchange will be corrected in the version Maryland will be using as the state revamps its own troubled website with Connecticut’s technology, Maryland’s information technology secretary assured lawmakers Tuesday. As Maryland faces a tight timeline before the next enrollment period begins in four months, Isabel FitzGerald told a legislative oversight panel that the state is on schedule to have its own flawed website fixed with the new technology in time for the next open enrollment period in November (7/15). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Texas Medicaid Rolls Grow Even Without Expansionlast_img read more

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In Effort To Soothe Public Concerns Over Gouging JJ To Release Drug

first_img The Wall Street Journal: Johnson & Johnson To Report Average Increases In List Prices For U.S. Drugs Ariad Pharmaceuticals Inc. on Monday accepted a $5.2 billion takeover offer from Japan’s Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc., making the Cambridge company the latest Massachusetts biotech to be gobbled up by a global drug company seeking to strengthen its product line. The 26-year-old Ariad has a blood cancer drug on the market and is seeking US approval for a lung cancer treatment. (Weisman, 1/9) In Effort To Soothe Public Concerns Over Gouging, J&J To Release Drug Pricing Report The pharmaceutical company wants to show how much it is spending on research and that its sales growth isn’t coming from raising prices on drugs. Meanwhile, an acquisition plan in the biotech world could be a sign of good things to come for the industry. Stat: Memory-Boosting Prevagen Has No Scientific Backing, FTC Says The Wall Street Journal: Drug Deal Is Bet Price Pressures Have Eased In other pharmaceutical news — Boston Globe: Ariad Pharmaceuticals To Be Acquired By Takeda For $5.2 Billion  The Federal Trade Commission and the New York state attorney general Monday filed a complaint against a supplement company that claims its pills can help with age-associated memory loss. The supplement, Prevagen, is heavily advertised, with commercials —  including on national broadcast and cable networks such as CNN, Fox News, and NBC — claiming it can improve memory in 90 days. Ads feature charts depicting dramatic cognitive improvement among users. The FTC says these claims are deceptive. (Swetlitz, 1/9) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Takeda Pharmaceutical Company announced Monday morning it plans to acquire cancer-focused Ariad Pharmaceuticals for about $4.7 billion in cash. That represents about a 75% premium to Friday’s closing price. The premium by itself is a good sign for small and midsize biotechs—deals like this one will go a long way toward helping biotech stocks rebound from last year’s dismal performance. (Grant, 1/9) It may be one of the shortest tenures in FDA history. Dr. Robert Califf, who took office as FDA commissioner last February, is preparing to vacate the premises. Like other presidential appointees, Califf must resign effective Jan. 20th, Inauguration Day. In the absence of a new FDA chief, Dr. Stephen Ostroff, the FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, will again become acting commissioner. It’s a role he’s familiar with; he  also served as acting commissioner from April 2015 to last February, when Califf was sworn in. (Kaplan, 1/9) Stat: A Familiar Face Will Take Over As Acting Commissioner Of FDA Johnson & Johnson is planning to issue a report next month outlining how much it has raised the U.S. prices of its prescription drugs, the latest pharmaceutical company effort to address intense public concern about the cost of medicines. The report will give the average increase in the list prices for all company drugs in the U.S., as well as their average price after the discounts given by the company, J&J officials said. (Rockoff, 1/10) last_img read more

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The Logitech G502 gaming mouse goes wireless without compromise

first_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Logitech G has revealed the Logitech G502 LIGHTSPEED, a new wireless gaming mouse that boasts the same highly regarded design as the original wired G502, but with added technology crammed inside to make it one of the most advanced gaming peripherals yet. The biggest focus for the new Logitech G502 LIGHTSPEED is of course wireless technology, with Logitech G claiming the new mouse is just as responsive as a wired mouse with an ultra-speedy 1ms report rate. This is easily responsive enough for eSport and competitive players.Related: Best Gaming Mouse 2019Logitech’s HERO 16K sensor is another exciting addition, which not only allows users to crank sensitivity up to an industry-leading 16,000 DPI sensitivity, but also sees a 10x improvement for power efficiency when compared to previous generation Logitech gaming mice. Where does this leave battery life? Logitech reckons the G502 LIGHTSPEED is capable of non-stop gaming for up to 48 hours with lighting activated, and up to 60 hours with the lights turned off. Both of these figures are impressive, but you can essentially have unlimited battery life instead thank to wireless charging when paired with the the compatible Powerplay charging – this is sold separately though, and doesn’t come cheap with a retail price of £110.Related: Best Gaming Keyboard 2019Elsewhere, Logitech G has retained the same design and physical features as the fan favourite wired G502 gaming mouse. There are 11 programmable buttons, a dual-mode Hyper-fast scroll wheel and customisable LIGHTSYNC RGB lighting on the Logitech G logo to give it that snazzy gaming peripheral look with approximately 16.8 million colours to play with via the Logitech G HUB software.And despite all the technology crammed inside, the Logitech G502 LIGHTSPEED only weighs 114g. If that’s too light for you, Logitech G even bundles in optional weights so you can increase the mouse’s heft by an extra 16g.The Logitech G502 LIGHTSPEED gaming mouse will be available to buy before the end of the month, with a suggested retail price of £129.99. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

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Bank of Canadas Stephen Poloz gets chance today to put rate cut

first_imgBank of Canada’s Stephen Poloz gets chance today to put rate cut speculation on ice Investors now see a strong chance of a cut by the Bank of Canada over the next 12 months Email Facebook Join the conversation → Share this storyBank of Canada’s Stephen Poloz gets chance today to put rate cut speculation on ice Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn advertisement Featured Stories Twitter Reddit Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz speaks Iqaluit, the capital of the northern territory of Nunavut, Monday, April.Canadian Press/Graham Hughes Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz has an opportunity Monday to address market expectations that his next move will probably be an interest-rate cut.Poloz speaks in Iqaluit, the capital of the northern territory of Nunavut, in his first appearance since the Federal Reserve’s surprise dovish policy shift two weeks ago triggered concern about the state of the global economy. A segment of Canada’s yield curve considered a potential recession signal inverted March 22 for the first time since 2007. Investors now see a strong chance of a cut by the Bank of Canada over the next 12 months.This raises a major challenge for Poloz, one of the few central bankers worldwide still talking about the need — at least over time — for rates to move higher. Whether he shrugs off the latest market moves remains the big question ahead of the central bank’s next decision on April 24. As income pie shrinks, Ottawa and business talk past each other Canada’s debt to GDP ratio: ‘Nerve-racking to see debt servicing costs rising so quickly,’ RBC economist says ‘The yield curve is the best economist out there’: What Canada’s first inverted curve in 12 years tells us “We don’t think it’s appropriate to be talking about cutting rates at this juncture,” said Doug Porter, chief economist at Bank of Montreal. Poloz “could take one more turn of the dovish screw, I suppose, by going completely neutral — although I believe it would be more appropriate to do that at the next decision date. ”The gap between Canadian three-month and 10-year rates went negative on March 21, tracking a similar move in the U.S. For investors predicting a recession south of the border, it wouldn’t be far-fetched to assume Canada would be pulled into one as well. All of the country’s last eight recessions have coincided with contractions in the U.S.Related Stories:High-flying loonie could give Bank of Canada pause in this week’s interest rate decisionBank of Canada to diverge from Fed’s easing path this year‘We see Bank of Canada on hold for next couple of years’: What the economists say about Wednesday’s rate decisionLast StatementsThe Bank of Canada hasn’t said much during the recent turbulence. Its last public communication was a March 14 speech by Senior Deputy Governor Carolyn Wilkins in which she highlighted the vulnerabilities created by global leverage but said the central bank expects the worldwide expansion to continue and Canada’s economic growth to pick up after a weaker-than-expected first half.Her comments reiterated language from the central bank’s decision on March 6, when it left rates unchanged and toned down its conviction that interest rates need to go higher, while sticking to an overall hiking stance.Poloz’s speech, titled the “Importance of Trade,” will be published at 2:55 p.m. Ottawa time. Iqaluit is situated 195 miles south of the Arctic Circle.Even as markets continue to bet on cuts, the data is mixed enough to keep Poloz on the sidelines for the foreseeable future. The latest gross domestic product data show the economy expanded at a 0.3 per cent pace in January, painting a less bleak picture than feared. Growth is tracking an annualized first-quarter pace of more than 1 per cent, a big improvement from the previous quarter’s 0.4 per cent.What Bloomberg’s Economists Say“The Canadian expansion faces a host of challenges in 2019. Escalating global risks and weaker-than-expected GDP at year-end signal below-trend growth this year. This means inflationary pressures should be subdued, which will allow the Bank of Canada to pause on its path back to neutral to assess the changing landscape.”The Bank of Canada will release a new set of quarterly economic forecasts at its April meeting that will likely be revised down. In January, it forecast growth of 2 per cent in 2018 and 1.7 percent this year. The 2018 number came in at 1.8 per cent. Economists have since lowered estimates for 2019 closer to 1.5 per cent.Neutral RatePolicy makers will also use the April meeting to review their neutral interest rate forecast — a key variable for plotting decisions. The measure is used to gauge how stimulative the policy rate is: the bigger the gap between the actual rate and the neutral rate, the more stimulative the policy, while a smaller gap would indicate fewer hikes are required. A downward revision would imply current policy is tighter than previously assumed.Until now, the central bank has estimated the neutral rate is between 2.5 per cent and 3.5 per cent, versus a policy rate of 1.75 per cent.Bloomberg.com April 1, 201910:34 AM EDT Filed under News Economy Recommended For You’This keeps us in the game’: GM throws Oshawa plant a lifeline with $170M investment that will save 300 jobsTrans Mountain construction work can go ahead as National Energy Board re-validates permitsDavid Rosenberg: Deflation is still the No. 1 threat to global economic stability — and central banks know itBank of Canada drops mortgage stress test rate for first time since 2016The storm is coming and investors need a financial ark to see them through Comment More 0 Comments Sponsored By: What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Bloomberg News Theophilos Argitis ← Previous Next →last_img read more

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Bank of Canadas Stephen Poloz reinforces perception rates are on hold

first_img Email Featured Stories Join the conversation → advertisement ← Previous Next → Headwinds exist and require the policy rate to remain stimulative, said Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz.Canadian Press Facebook Twitter Recommended For YouXPEL Announces Listing on Nasdaq; Registration Statement on Form 10 Declared Effective by SECBoeing to spend half of $100 mln fund to support 737 MAX crash victim familiesTSX opens higher on gains in materials sharesYields fall on weak housing, U.S.-China trade concernsWall Street opens flat, investors shrug off bank results Comment Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz indicated he’s all but abandoned any bias for higher interest rates, saying officials are simply focused on keeping policy aligned with current economic conditions.Asked at a press briefing Saturday in Washington whether he’s done with hiking, Poloz said: “That’s a very data dependent question.” He also dismissed the idea the central bank has any specific target for borrowing costs, even though policy makers estimate interest rates would probably need to be higher were the economy not facing headwinds.“What matters is what forces are acting in the economy,” and what’s the level of interest rates that will bring the economy into balance, said Poloz, who was attending meetings of the International Monetary Fund. “That number is going to change every time something hits the economy, whether it’s a positive thing or a negative thing.”The comments are consistent with the central bank’s recent efforts to temper previous statements about the need to raise rates. They also bring it more into line with the dovish tilt in global monetary policy. Over the past six weeks, Poloz and his officials have highlighted the need for continued stimulus amid a slowing economy and downplayed the notion they have a precise understanding of where rates would need to settle even if headwinds dissipate.‘Stimulative’ PolicyEstimates of how high rates will eventually need to go are simply theoretical, and the actual “neutral rate” is an unknown, said Poloz. Regardless, headwinds exist and require the policy rate to remain stimulative, he said.Related Stories:Stephen Poloz’s dashboard: The latest charts that matter most to the Bank of CanadaHigh-flying loonie could give Bank of Canada pause in this week’s interest rate decisionBank of Canada may diverge from dovish peers as economy reboundsAt the last rate decision on March 6, “we said pretty clearly, conditions warrant a rate of interest below neutral,” Poloz said . “So it’s obvious that we’re still working on some headwinds or things that are keeping the economy getting all the way home. That’s as far as I can go at this stage.”A good indication of how the economy is doing comes later Monday, when the central bank releases the spring edition of its Business Outlook Survey and Senior Loan Officer Survey, the institution’s last major publications before the April 24 rate announcement and quarterly Monetary Policy Report. Also this week, Statistics Canada releases data on trade, inflation and retail sales.In Washington, Poloz did provide some insight into the Bank of Canada’s recent change in tone, saying it was a case of “confidence in the outlook eroding as we got a series of data points that were on the wrong side of things.”Given the weaker data, Poloz said governing council became a “little less confident we would get anywhere close to neutral range in the near term so we better tone down that language to make sure markets understand that that’s not a destination like right away. “We’re trying to inject more conditionality into it,” the governor said.While markets are pricing in a small chance of a cut over the next year, Poloz said investor expectations seem to be consistent with a belief interest rates will be “on hold for a while.”“What’s a while, I don’t know,” he said. “Once again, that’s a data dependent notion.”Bloomberg.com More Sponsored By: Share this storyBank of Canada’s Stephen Poloz reinforces perception rates are on hold Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn April 15, 20198:01 AM EDT Filed under News Economy Bank of Canada’s Stephen Poloz reinforces perception rates are on hold Business Outlook Survey out today will offer more clues on economy Bloomberg News What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Reddit Theophilos Argitis 1 Commentslast_img read more

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Tesla Model 3 Sales Shatter All Records In December 2018

first_img Tesla Model 3 Sales Against Its Nearest Rivals Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 2, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 sales soared to new, record-shattering heights.Never before has a single plug-in electric car sold at this high level of volume in a single month.The big Tesla Model 3 push was definitely on as Q4 came to an end. Tesla Model 3 Sales Beyond Expectations: New Record In Septembercenter_img More Model 3 Sales Info Tesla Model 3 Sales Charge Way Past Milestone Of 100,000 In U.S. In both May and June, Tesla Model 3 sales exceeded 6,000 units, but that’s tiny compared to the explosion of sales in July, which amounted to 14,250. Then, in August, sales shot up to 17,800. Then, September closed out Q3 with a real blast as sales hit 22,250 units.Q4 started out predictably softer with Tesla Model 3 sales at 17,750 in the U.S. in October. For November, InsideEVs estimates Tesla sold 18,650 Model 3 in the U.S.Well, now it’s end-of-quarter reporting time so we return back to a sales explosion. InsideEVs estimates that Tesla sold an astounding 25,250 Model 3 in December 2018 (*this figure doesn’t include Canada). That’s a new all-time high for the Model 3 and the single highest monthly figure for a plug-in electric car ever. Let that sink in for a moment…Year-Over-YearIf we look at year-over-year for the Model 3, the gains are ridiculous. In December 2017, Tesla sold 1,060 Model 3. Compare that to last month’s 25,250 and you’ll notice there’s more than just a wee bit of growth there.The YTD tally is in now too for the Model 3. That figure for all of 2018 checks in at stands at 139,782. Cumulative sales now stand at 141,546, which is way higher than all of the plug-in vehicles sold in the U.S. in 2015.The highest previous volume of sales ever for an electric car in a single year was back in 2014 when LEAF sales hit 30,200, so the Model 3 obliterated that record and almost matched that number in a single month.Moving on to the Tesla Model S and Model XFor December, we estimate the following for U.S. sales of these two Teslas:Tesla Model S – 3,250Tesla Model X – 4,100More Model S & X sales info for December hereAutomotive Group 2018 Yearly SalesTesla easily grabs the YTD win. Our tally puts the automaker at a combined total of 191,627 sold (Model 3, S & X) in the U.S. for all of 2018. We need not even list any other automaker here, as none were even close.last_img read more

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Tesla Model Y a great electric crossover with questionable rush to open

first_imgTesla unveiled Model Y last night and we were fairly impressed by what the automaker was able to do to transform Model 3 into a crossover with 7-seats and still up to 300 miles of range.That said, the accomplishment is now being overshadowed by a questionable rush to order from Tesla in what appears to be an attempt to bring in more cash. more…The post Tesla Model Y: a great electric crossover with questionable rush to open orders appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

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Law slams Lancashire for dumping Cork

first_imgCounty Championship Division One Share on Messenger Shares00 Read more Yorkshire Cricket Share on WhatsApp Lancashire 204-8; YorkshireDay one, close Share on Twitter First published on Wed 13 Aug 2008 21.30 EDT Share on Facebook Share on Pinterest Law slams Lancashire for dumping Cork Sign up to the Spin – our weekly cricket round-up Since you’re here… Share via Email Support The Guardiancenter_img Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Share via Email Asked about his own future, Law said he would like to stay for another year but conceded this outburst might affect his chances – which will not be helped by his continuing involvement with the rebel Indian Cricket League.Law was speaking after another poor display by Lancashire’s top five on a pitch which he conceded was the best at Old Trafford this season. Matthew Hoggard and Adil Rashid bowled excellently, supported by Darren Gough’s positive captaincy, to share six wickets after the match finally got under way four sessions late and Law won the toss. But too many of the batsmen gave away their wickets, including Law, who steered Tim Bresnan’s loosener tamely to second slip to waste the platform he had laid after promoting himself to the problem position of No3.Law shared a second-wicket stand of 54 with Paul Horton until Gough’s boldness in introducing Rashid’s leg spin in only the 14th over quickly paid off as he trapped Horton lbw with a top-spinner. Lou Vincent’s struggle to justify his employment as Lancashire’s overseas player continued and Cork’s first chance to prove a point ended with a heave at Rashid. Only Steven Croft, with a battling fifty, saved Lancashire from further embarrassment. Topics County Championship 2008 Division One match reports … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Lancashire Andy Wilson at Old Trafford Wed 13 Aug 2008 21.30 EDT Share on Facebook County Championship Division One Stuart Law last night launched an astonishing attack on Lancashire’s decision not to offer a new contract to Dominic Cork, raising major questions about the captain’s own future with the county. The 39-year-old Australian, who signed a one-year deal when he was appointed to succeed Mark Chilton last autumn, said he had not been consulted before the cricket committee made the decision to release Cork on Monday and left no doubts that he would have argued strongly for the former England all-rounder’s retention.”You’d think the captain would be involved in something like that, wouldn’t you?” he said. “I’ve got to walk out with these players – the people sitting up there drinking gin and tonics don’t have to. Yes, he’s 37 but there’s plenty of life in the old dog yet – at times of need you throw the ball to Dominic because he can make things happen. I’ll probably get into a lot of trouble for what I’ve said but I’m just telling the truth – Dominic Cork is a quality performer.” Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Marlands declaration may have come too late

first_imgEngland cricket team Share on Facebook Premier League Matt Scott Topics First published on Mon 19 Jan 2009 19.01 EST Reuse this content The Premier League’s traditional “big four” have forced its officials to rethink their failing broadcast strategy in China. With the domestic market invitation to tender now with the broadcasters, the Premier League has turned its attention to how to take its international broadcast rights to market. The sale of rights for seasons 2007-8 to 2009-10 in China went to WinTV, a pay channel that was the highest bidder. But the big clubs immediately expressed their dismay at a channel that had a reach of only 300,000 viewers. Although WinTV’s base has now broadened into the millions it is insignificant against the billion-viewer exposure achieved by the free-to-air CCTV channel. Under pressure from Manchester United, Chelsea, Arsenal and Liverpool, the Premier League is considering how to launch a viable free-to-air show in the world’s most populous nation. The league is looking at ways to exploit commercial partnerships with various firms in the sporting-goods, soft-drinks and beer sectors in an effort to provide branded, free-to-air coverage in China.Apey’s awayPatricio Apey, Andy Murray’s agent of the past three years, may well end his association with the world No4 weeks early after Murray announced last month he would switch to Simon Fuller’s 19 Management. That contract does not begin until March 1 but Apey has not yet travelled to the Australian Open where his highest-profile client is second-favourite in the betting and he is expected to cut all ties in the coming days, handing the responsibility over to 19. Apey did not return a call yesterday. Tennis The personal touch will decide the election for chairman of the England and Wales Cricket Board as Giles Clarke and Jonathan Marland embark on a round of heart-to-heart talks with county chairmen.The vote of the 18 chairmen and the MCC will take place in a secret ballot overseen by the Electoral Reform Society on February 9. Although his abrasive leadership style has put noses out of joint, Clarke’s position as the incumbent works in his favour.Lord Marland declared himself a candidate in the election on Sunday, outflanking the Clarke supporters who expected their man to be returned unopposed. Marland’s surprise move demonstrates that nothing in the highly secretive election process can be taken for granted but insiders say his late declaration will count against him because he has not built the necessary relationships in the game.One chairman with long experience of the voting procedure for the ECB’s top job explained that neither Clarke nor Marland will ever know for sure who voted for or against them. Ballot papers are sent to the MCC and county chairmen’s homes, meaning that the destiny of the position is entirely at the whim of 19 men who might even be operating outside of their own clubs’ mandate.As the last two ballots to decide who of Clarke and Mike Soper would become chairman – the first was tied – demonstrated, the identity of who votes for whom is not disclosed. Both occasions saw a single abstention who has never been revealed.Suffering home lossesAnyone struggling to sell their beloved home in these recessionary times might take comfort in the knowledge that sports stars are no better off. Phil Neville’s gaudily appointed six-bedroom mansion (replete with four-bed “staff house”) near Burnley has been on the market since last April and remains so despite the Everton captain dropping the asking price from £4m to £3.5m. Then there is Kevin Pietersen’s three-bedroom flat in the exclusive Thames-side Battersea Reach development. The England batsman, right, put it on the market last autumn, perhaps to move up the property ladder after boosting his salary on taking up the international captaincy. But, having taken a pay cut on relinquishing that position, Pietersen has since also taken a hit on his asking price from £975,000 to £925,000. That is still more than he paid for it and market observers expect he will have to lower the price again if he is going to push the sale through.Chinese whispers Andy Murray Digger Share on LinkedIn Mon 19 Jan 2009 19.01 EST Since you’re here… Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp ECB Shares00 Share on Messenger Cricket Share via Email Sign up to the Spin – our weekly cricket round-up Support The Guardian Share on Facebook England cricket team Digger Share via Email … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Pinterest Share on Twitter Read more Marland’s declaration may have come too latelast_img read more

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Wenatchee Womans Death Ruled Accidental DrowningInslee Announces 12 M to Help Immigrants

first_imgThe death of 43 year old Danielle Rea Combs of Wenatchee has been ruled an accidental drowning. Grant County Coroner Craig Morrison completed the autopsy on Tuesday.Combs was riding in a vehicle with a companion early Friday morning when they stopped to rest around 3:30 a.m. While her companion slept in the car, Combs apparently walked to the lake’s edge and fell in. Her companion called for help around 8:30 a.m. when Combs couldn’t be found. Deputies located Combs’ body near the shoreline around 11 a.m.At this point, investigators have found no signs of foul play.last_img

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ICON announces results of new survey that examines key challenge of RD

first_imgMay 9 2018ICON plc, a global provider of drug development solutions and services to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device industries, today announced the results from a new survey of pharmaceutical executives and professionals by ICON and Pharma Intelligence, which examines the key challenge of declining research and development (R&D) efficiency.A roundtable of pharmaceutical industry executives discussed the survey findings, alongside the key challenges affecting the pharmaceutical industry. The discussion enabled industry experts to identify the potential for generating savings and improving trial efficiency, as well as assessing how digital disruption is forcing change.Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustryResearch reveals how mirror therapy relieves phantom limb painThe challenges most frequently cited by survey respondents are patient enrolment (56%), site start-up (43%) and regulatory approval delays and changes (43%). Respondents also identified study start up, patient recruitment and retention, and protocol development as three key areas with the most potential for generating savings and efficiencies.”ICON recognizes the challenges our customers are facing and is focused on building our integrated site and patient network to improve trial start up, as well as patient recruitment and retention.” commented Dr. Steve Cutler, Chief Executive Officer, ICON, on the survey findings.Opinions of which technology trends will have the greatest impact on clinical trial operations varied. 36% of survey respondents noted that leveraging big data and AI technologies would have the most impact on improving clinical trial efficiency. 35% reported that risk-based approaches toward monitoring held greater opportunity for impact on clinical development.The survey demonstrates that industry have realized the need for a holistic effort to transform trials, however, only one in five survey respondents (22%) stated their organization currently has an integrated effort to drive clinical trials transformations. A further 83% of respondents believe strategic partnerships with CROs will be important to the success of clinical trials over the next five years.Informed by the survey responses, the Improving Pharma R&D Efficiency whitepaper proposes a three-part framework for guiding strategy in transforming clinical trials. The whitepaper argues that while adopting disparate tactics can improve elements of clinical trial efficiency, the potential is even greater when change is applied in a coordinated fashion to reimagine and reinvent the R&D enterprise. Source:https://www.iconplc.com/news-events/news/icon-sponsors-industry-wi/index.xmlcenter_img Adopting a radical patient focus; A greater use of adaptive clinical trials and other alternate trial models; Automating data collection and analysislast_img read more

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KFU medical departments seek to find treatments for hereditary syndromes

first_imgJun 6 2018Newest results were showcased at the International Myology School in Moscow on 16th – 19th May 2018. KFU was represented by Junior Research Associate Mikhail Mavlikeev. In particular, he spoke about an expedition to the Republic of Dagestan, a multiethnic region in Southern Russia, conducted by a combined team of researchers from Kazan, Ryazan, Moscow, and Saint-Petersburg.As he explained, “We work on diagnostics of orphan diseases and aim to create medications to alleviate such conditions.Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapy”Dagestan is a mountainous land with many isolated villages, and marriages between first and second cousins are rather widespread, which leads to higher prevalence of hereditary syndromes. During one of such trips we found an extremely rare ailment – limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2Q. It had only been described in literature once before we published our inquiry.”Another voyage to Dagestan was aimed to gather material for a general hereditary syndrome registry, and hundreds of patients were inducted.”Those patients have rare genetic diseases, and there is a lack of experts who can tackle such cases. There is also a significant portion of undiagnosed individuals. We fill in our registry to speed up medication research. For instance, currently there are works on a drug to fight the most widespread hereditary disease of muscles – Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 1 in 3,500 boys are affected. Last year, driaspersen, a drug based on exon skipping, was registered in the United States. Other research is ongoing in various countries for other diseases. To that end, our registry can be of great assistance.”In other news, DMGP works together with the Gene and Cell Technologies Lab to find new ways to battle another neuromuscular disease – dysferlinopathy. Researchers test their findings on transgene animals.Importantly, students of all ages are deeply involved in this cutting-edge research. This year, 46 students submitted their course projects at DMGP. Source:https://kpfu.ru/eng/news-eng/muscular-nervous-hereditary-syndromes-research.htmllast_img read more

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Study Food insecurity strongly linked to mortality rates in adults

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 28 2018A wide array of negative health outcomes have been associated with food insecurity including diabetes, depression, and cardiovascular disease. But could food insecurity lead to an increased risk of mortality? According to University of Illinois agricultural economist Craig Gundersen, no one has researched this relationship until now.In a new study published in PLOS ONE, Gundersen and his co-authors find that household food insecurity is strongly associated with mortality rates in adults. Researchers took data from adults living in Ontario, Canada who participated in the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) in 2005, 2007-08, and 2009-10.Related StoriesNutritional supplements offer no protection against cardiovascular diseases, say researchersReplacing a small amount of red meat with healthier foods may improve life expectancyNew drug provides hope for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophyFrom an 18-question module, participants were classified as “food secure,” “marginally food insecure,” “moderately food insecure,” or “severely food insecure.” The researchers then matched the answers to information about the participants’ subsequent mortality from the Ontario Registered Persons Database.Researchers found that the more severe level of food insecure of an individual, the higher the risk of mortality. “We know that those with more severe levels of food insecurity have worse health outcomes and we found the same with mortality.”Gundersen says the results call for an expansion of policy interventions to reduce food insecurity. “Fortunately, there are proven methods to reduce food insecurity in the U.S. – the most critical being the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program. And this is one of the most effective ways we can reduce mortality rates, along with other social safety-net programs.”In light of the proven benefits of SNAP in reducing food insecurity and its consequences, Gundersen argues that a reconsideration of the costs associated with SNAP should be revisited. “When we think about the cost associated with SNAP, of course there’s a dollar figure to how much it costs to get people SNAP, but we also have to think about the benefits of it: people living longer because they are getting sufficient levels of food.” Source:https://emails.illinois.edu/newsletter/181945.htmllast_img read more

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Push to gamble big on mass production of Ebola vaccines

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) of Rixensart, Belgium, is now testing an Ebola vaccine for safety in volunteers at no risk of contracting the disease. A second one, made by NewLink Genetics of Ames, Iowa, is expected to enter clinical trials later this month. If the vaccines prove safe and able to trigger the desired immune responses, an earlier WHO consultation found wide support for shortcutting the standard progression of vaccine clinical trials and jumping straight from these phase I trials to phase III efficacy tests in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone, the three hard-hit countries.In early November, GSK expects to have enough data from the phase I studies to decide whether to launch phase III trials, says Ripley Ballou, who heads GSK’s Ebola program. Health care workers—now broadly defined to include everyone from hospital janitors to burial teams—will be first in line. GSK earlier predicted it would have 10,000 doses by the end of the year that could be used in phase III trials, but Ballou says production has been going extremely well, and there may be as many as 20,000 doses by then.But that would still be nowhere near enough doses to stop the outbreak in West Africa. That’s why there’s a push to ramp up production to millions of doses as soon as the phase III trials launch. What the world can’t afford, Farrar says, is “to be in a position where the vaccine proves to be safe and effective in small scale-randomized trials and then we have to wait another 3 to 6 months to produce it.” Doctors Without Borders (MSF), which has been the main provider of care from the epidemic’s start, agrees. “Production should be scaled up rapidly even before end results on efficacy because this will permit that more people can benefit faster from the vaccines once efficacy has been demonstrated,” says MSF’s Annick Antierens, who was also at last week’s meeting.How many shots are available will depend in part on how much product constitutes a “dose.” GSK is testing its vaccine at two different doses, and if the lower one works, they’ll have twice as much vaccine. NewLink Genetics, a small company with less experience in vaccines, is lagging behind GSK, but safety studies could start later this month. The doses tested in those trials will have an even greater range. “If one of the lower doses proves to be effective, every vial would yield several shots,” says Gary Kobinger, a scientist who helped develop the vaccine at the Public Health Agency of Canada in Winnipeg. If that happens, the amount of vaccine available would multiply at a stroke.Just how fast vaccinemakers can spit out product presents a major unknown. Even a multinational company like GSK, which has large vaccine manufacturing plants, is asking itself how rapidly it can make millions of doses, given other vaccine production schedules. Money is an issue, too. Funding for the phase III trials does not yet exist, Ballou says, let alone for churning out millions of shots. “There is simply no budgeting model for this,” he says.Ballou says a “back of the envelope” calculation based mainly on personnel expenses shows that GSK could produce up to half a million doses for $25 million, and that cost would drop with increased quantity. But the company does not yet have any reliable cost estimates for production at a larger scale, he says, especially given the fact that no one can accurately estimate how much is needed now or in the future, and what the vaccine’s shelf life is. Ballou does know this much with certainty, however: “There are very substantial capital investments going from where we are now to what would be needed for millions of doses.”Politically, ordering vaccines without knowing if they’ll work is a hard sell. Marie-Paule Kieny, an assistant director-general at WHO, notes that there will be plenty of criticism if vaccine is purchased as an insurance policy and then not used. “At the end, when the analysis is made, people are always much cleverer,” she says.Kieny should know. She led WHO’s vaccine efforts during the H1N1 influenza pandemic in 2009. Then, too, vaccine manufacturers raced to provide many millions of doses, but most of them arrived after the pandemic had peaked in many places. “People said: Why did you waste all this money on this vaccine?” Kieny says, and the same could happen with an Ebola vaccine. “There will be inquiries, parliaments asking: How can you invest hundreds of millions of dollars in something that has not even been proven effective?”Many are looking to the United States government to foot the bill, or the majority of it, but no commitment has yet been made. A U.S. government official who is involved with these discussions and asked not to be named says the government is helping to set up the efficacy studies as quickly as possible, and says their results should be awaited “before large sums of money need to be invested in scale up of production.” The official assured that “things that can be done now are being done, including technology transfer.”Even if the vaccine works, and is produced in large quantities, rolling it out on a mass scale will be a struggle, especially in places where there is distrust of government, medical officials, big pharma, and clinical trials in general. The populations of the affected countries would need to be well-informed in advance, but even that carries an ethical risk: They might prepare for a vaccine that may never come, or may come too late. Yet there is no choice, Kieny says: A big education campaign “is very much needed and likely to start early in January.”*The Ebola Files: Given the current Ebola outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made a collection of research and news articles on the viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public.center_img The world needed an Ebola vaccine months ago to stop the epidemic that has exploded in West Africa—but none existed. Now, the race is on to develop vaccines in a matter of months, instead of the years it typically takes. But even if one of the current candidates works, many questions remain. How fast can companies make millions of vaccine doses? When should they start production? And who will foot the multimillion-dollar bill?At the end of a World Health Organization (WHO) meeting held in Geneva, Switzerland, last week to discuss Ebola vaccines, several participants were convinced that mass production of experimental products should begin in parallel with studies that aim to determine whether they actually work. “I’d pull out all the stops,” says Ira Longini, a statistician at the University of Florida at Gainesville who attended the meeting. “I’d try to make 30 to 40 million doses to cover at risk West African populations.”Jeremy Farrar, an infectious disease researcher and head of the Wellcome Trust in London—which has provided funding for Ebola vaccine testing—agrees. “We may come to regret that we have to throw those vaccines away if they prove not to be effective,” Farrar says, “but I think that is a risk we have to take.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

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Armored lizard was ancestor of todays turtles

first_imgIt’s a primitive turtle, but it looks nothing like today’s dome-shelled reptiles. Resembling a broad-bodied, short-snouted lizard, the 240-million-year-old creature—dubbed Pappochelys rosinae—appears to be a missing link between prototurtles and their modern relatives, according to a new study. If so, the find could fill in a number of pieces about turtle evolution.The findings are “a very important contribution in addressing who turtles are related to, as well as the evolutionary origin of the turtle shell,” says Tyler Lyson, a vertebrate paleontologist at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science who was not involved with the study. “These have been two vexing questions for evolutionary biologists for the last 200 years.”About two dozen or so fossils of the creature have been recovered, all of them from 240-million-year-old rocks deposited as sediment on the floor of a shallow, 5-kilometer-long lake in what is now southern Germany. Most of the remains include only bits of bone and are from individuals of various sizes, says Hans-Dieter Sues, a vertebrate paleontologist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. But between the two most complete specimens yet found, he and Rainer Schoch, a paleontologist at the State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart in Germany, have put together a full skeleton and most of a skull. P. rosinae adults likely measured about 20 centimeters long, with half of that being a long, whiplike tail. (The species name is a combination of the Greek words for “grandfather turtle” and the person who helped clean rock from the fossils to prepare them for analysis.) Its peglike teeth suggest the animal fed on worms and other soft-bodied prey, Sues says. Yet skeletal anatomy reveals Pappochelys was no run-of-the-mill lizard, Sues and Schoch report online today in Nature.  Unlike lizards, but much like the earliest known relative of turtles (Eunotosaurus, which lived in what is now South Africa about 20 million years earlier), Pappochelys’s ribs are broad, dense, and have a T-shaped cross section. In later, full-shelled species of turtles, those ribs are even wider and have fused with each other and certain bones in the shoulder girdle to form a carapace, or upper shell. But unlike the earlier Eunotosaurus, Pappochelys has gastralia, or belly ribs. These free-floating bones developed within the tissue of the underbelly, Sues says; in more evolved species of turtles, these gastralia broaden and fuse to form a plastron, or lower shell.Because the fossils were originally entombed in lake floor sediments, the researchers suggest that Pappochelys spent a lot of its time in the water and around the lakeshore—a lifestyle similar to that of today’s marine iguanas, Sues says. So having broad, dense bones and gastralia would have acted like a diver’s weight belt, helping Pappochelys fight buoyancy and forage on the lake’s bottom. But these bones would also have had a beneficial side effect: They would have offered some degree of protection from predators, such as large amphibians or fish living in the lake, by deflecting or blunting their bites.“In the water, predators can get you from all angles,” Sues notes. Over millions of years, evolution sculpted the bones to create the full set of body armor seen in modern-day turtles. The first full-shelled turtles show up in the fossil record about 205 million years ago.The two distinctive holes on the side of the head behind each eye of Pappochelys provide vital clues to the evolutionary heritage of turtles, says Torsten Scheyer, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland who was not involved in the work. Those holes mark the species as a member of the diapsid (“two arches”) group of reptiles. That diapsid group includes crocodiles, lizards, snakes, dinosaurs, and their surviving kin, birds. But because modern turtle skulls lack these holes, some scientists have proposed that turtles were the last surviving members of an anapsid (“no arches”) lineage of reptiles. But now, he adds, these fossils of turtle progenitors firmly back up the results of genetic analyses of living reptiles: Turtles belong on the diapsid branch of the reptilian family tree.Scheyer says fossils that are even more complete, or ones that have the bones preserved in more lifelike arrangements, would provide better information about the species. “I’m really looking forward to see more research done on these outstanding fossils.” Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Lawmakers decry Trump plan to slash NIH 2018 budget

first_img Collins made no mention of the president’s 2018 budget request, which will officially be released next week, in his oral testimony. Appearing alongside the heads of five of NIH’s 27 institutes and centers, Collins instead offered examples of how NIH research has led to new drugs for cystic fibrosis and cancer treatments that help the immune system fight tumors.“You don’t have to comment on the budget, but we have to comment,” DeLauro observed at one point. The closest any lawmaker came to asking Collins for his thoughts on the White House’s plans for NIH was when Lowey asked whether private investment could make up for the cuts. In response, Collins described a White House meeting last week where biotech CEOs and academic scientists explained how companies relied on NIH-funded basic research. The biotech leaders “were quite clear … that their stockholders would not necessarily appreciate their putting money into things that are not directly connected to a product,” Collins said.DeLauro asked NIH officials to explain the role of the Fogarty International Center, which the Trump proposal would eliminate. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, reeled off examples of how Fogarty has trained health experts in Africa and South America to fight diseases such as HIV and Zika that are threats to the United States. “Even though they [the people being trained] are foreigners, they are helping us to be protected from disease,” Fauci said.Legislators also asked about the payments that NIH makes to universities to cover the overhead costs of NIH-funded research. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price has suggested that eliminating these so-called indirect cost payments could shrink NIH’s budget by $5.8 billion without reducing the level of research funded. At the hearing, Representative Andy Harris (R–MD), who shares that view, asked why NIH pays out about 30% per grant in indirect costs whereas many foundations pay only 10%.Collins defended the payments, noting that universities are able to accept grants from funders that reimburse at a much lower rate only because they represent a small portion of overall research funding. Even NIH’s rate doesn’t cover the full costs of supporting NIH-funded research, Collins added. If the payments matched what foundations paid, he said, some universities, particularly state schools, would not be able to continue hosting NIH-funded research.Another question concerned a new NIH policy to boost the fortunes of young scientists by capping the number of grants held by an individual investigator. Collins said that this Grant Support Index, which in effect would limit an individual to three bread-and-butter grants, is a topic of “intense conversations” at NIH and in the community. “We will need to have an exceptions process” to avoid doing harm to exceptionally productive labs, Collins said.The White House plans to release details of Trump’s 2018 budget request on Tuesday. Congress then will have barely 4 months to take action before the 1 October start of the 2018 fiscal year. Email Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle in the U.S. House of Representatives today voiced their displeasure with the Trump administration’s proposed $5.8 billion cut next year to the budget of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. But they avoided asking NIH Director Francis Collins for his thoughts on the topic, perhaps knowing that it would put him in a very uncomfortable spot.During a hearing on “advances in biomedical research”, Representative Tom Cole (R–OK), who chairs the House appropriations panel that oversees NIH’s budget, said he was “very proud” of a $2 billion increase, to $34.1 billion, that Congress approved for NIH in 2017. That action overrode President Donald Trump’s request for a $1 billion cut. Cole added that he was “disappointed” with Trump’s 2018 proposal in his “skinny budget” released in March to cut NIH by 18%. That would “stall progress” and “potentially discourage promising young scientists” from pursuing biomedical research, Cole said.Representatives Rosa DeLauro (D–CT) and Nita Lowey (D–NY) said the president actually wants to cut NIH’s next budget by $8 billion, using as a baseline the amount that NIH had been appropriated for 2017 when the skinny budget was issued. That 24% drop would mean 5000 to 8000 fewer grants. Such a decline would “decimate biomedical research and the economy” by eliminating 90,000 jobs, said Lowey, citing a new analysis by United for Medical Research, an advocacy group based in Washington, D.C. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Stephen Voss/Redux Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Revolutionary malaria tests have unexpected downsides

first_img Even more concerning, Hopkins says, is that in several settings more than 30% of patients who tested negative for malaria received ACTs, whereas more than 20% who were positive did not, leaving them at risk of severe disease or death.The work is a synthesis of data from 10 studies conducted by the ACT Consortium in five sub-Saharan countries and Afghanistan between 2007 and 2013, covering 562,368 individual patient visits—an “extraordinary” number, says Patricia Walker, president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois, which published the paper online yesterday. The prescribers tended to be volunteers from the community trained as health workers, or shopkeepers who sell toilet paper and soft drinks along with dispensing medicine.The researchers don’t have firm explanations for the unexpected effects of RDT introduction, which varied from place to place. Health care workers are doing their best, Hopkins says, but they lack a simple test  to tell which fevers are caused by bacterial infections, much less which antibiotic to use. So when a malaria test is negative, they may think it’s safer to prescribe drugs than not.What’s more, patients come with clear expectations. If a mother has trudged many kilometers with a feverish child, it’s hard for a health worker to send her away without something “powerful,” such as an antibiotic or an antimalarial, Hopkins says. That may help explain why fewer than 25% of patients were given fever-suppressing drugs such as ibuprofen or paracetamol to relieve their symptoms, when that might have been all they needed. Why some patients diagnosed with malaria did not receive ACTs is more baffling, because there was no shortage of these drugs in the study settings. Hopkins speculates that prescribers who were used to frequent shortages may have saved ACTs for the sickest patients. Figuring out why health workers make these decisions is key, the authors say.“It’s not so easy to get physicians in the United States to follow recommendations, so it shouldn’t come as a big surprise that community health workers and private shopkeepers in some of the world’s poorest countries have a hard time diagnosing and prescribing drugs correctly,” says Chris Plowe, who heads the Institute for Global Health (IGH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. “If anything, this study probably overestimates how well things are done by workers with even less training and follow up.”Monitoring can help, says Abigail Pratt, who spent 10 years working on malaria with Population Services International (PSI) in remote parts of Southeast Asia and Africa and is now getting her doctorate at LSHTM. (She was not involved in the study.) In Cambodia, for instance, PSI collects bags of used RDTs from health providers each month and crosschecks the results with ACT use, with follow-up training, if needed.But she and others see a bigger need: Community health workers must be equipped to diagnose and treat fever from all causes, not malaria alone. That means donors need to move beyond funding specific diseases to helping build up the health system, says Myaing Myaing Nyunt, also of IGH. And scientists need to replicate the RDT revolution for bacterial infections. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A health official takes a drop of blood to test a woman for malaria in Lagos in 2016. A simple fix to a major public health challenge has turned out to be not so simple after all.In the early 2000s, researchers developed rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria, a major childhood killer. Simple as a home pregnancy kit, RDTs need just one drop of blood from a finger prick to detect the malaria parasite. They enabled health workers in remote villages in Africa and Asia to accurately and almost instantly diagnose malaria, making them less likely to overuse the new generation of “wonder drugs,” artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs), which were in danger of being lost to drug resistance.The use of RDTs skyrocketed after the World Health Organization in 2010 recommended that all suspected cases of malaria be confirmed by a test before treatment; roughly 314 million tests were procured in 2014. Together with ACTs, they have transformed malaria treatment in poor countries. It shouldn’t come as a big surprise that community health workers and private shopkeepers in some of the world’s poorest countries have a hard time diagnosing and prescribing drugs correctly. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP/Getty Images Email But now the largest analysis of RDT use yet, in poor settings in Africa and South Asia, suggests that along with its enormous benefits, the roll-out had unintended—and undesirable—effects. Where RDTs were used, the number of ACT prescriptions dropped, as hoped. But antibiotic prescriptions surged; at most study sites, 40% to 80% of patients walked away with the drugs, considerably more than needed them. (In one study in Zanzibar, just 22% of children with fever needed an antibiotic.) Such overuse could contribute to the global rise in antibiotic-resistant infections; it’s a classic example of when fixing one problem exacerbates another, says Heidi Hopkins of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), who, along with colleague Katia Bruxvoort, led the international team. By Leslie RobertsAug. 8, 2017 , 1:00 PM Revolutionary malaria tests have unexpected downsides Chris Plowe, University of Maryland School of Medicine Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

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Hurricane Harvey provides lab for US forecast experiments

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Caution should be taken in interpreting such results, though, says Chris Davis, a meteorologist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. “I do not believe meaningful conclusions about model performance can be reached for a single storm.” Still, Lin says, “If you count the full history of Harvey … I think FV3 global is likely the top performer.” FV3 may help with hurricane prediction when it starts powering U.S. forecasts, probably next year.Intensity can be even harder to predict than storm paths, and here NASA may be able to help. Many models missed that Harvey would grow to a category-4 storm just prior to landfall, in part because data on wind speeds are spotty and difficult to collect. Last December, NASA launched a constellation of eight identical microsatellites, called the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), to fill the gap. CYGNSS works by detecting the surface roughness of the ocean—a proxy for wind speeds—from the reflected radio signals of GPS satellites. These long-wavelength signals can pass through the veil of rain that cloaks hurricanes and blocks the microwaves that traditional weather satellites detect.Harvey was the first test for CYGNSS in severe winds. On 25 August, before Harvey made landfall, Christopher Ruf, an atmospheric scientist and engineer at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, strapped himself into a P-3 turboprop, an NOAA hurricane hunter, bound for the storm’s eye. His seat fell out beneath him again and again as the aircraft repeatedly plunged into the eyewall. Each time the wind grew more severe: The storm was rapidly intensifying.It will take weeks to know whether CYGNSS captured this sharp intensification, Ruf says. The weather service will be following his results closely. The constellation is technically only a 2-year experiment, but it’s possible the satellites could be pressed into operational service for NOAA, Ruf says. “Our simulations have shown that the forecast skill is improved. Now we need to demonstrate it for real.”With additional reporting by Julia Rosen. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) NOAA’s offering is a brand-new forecasting model. Two years ago, NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) in Princeton, New Jersey, won a competition to provide the computer code for the next-generation weather model of NWS. Current NWS models must wait for results from a time-consuming global simulation before they can zoom in on a smaller area and run a high-resolution model for hurricanes. With GFDL’s new code, the next-generation model will be able to simulate storms at the same time as it runs globally, in theory, improving forecasts for hurricane paths because its fine-scaled predictions feed immediately into the model’s next run, rather than lagging behind.Last week, GFDL anxiously watched the developing storm to see how it compared with a test run of the next-generation model. On Thursday, a day prior to landfall, the experiment agreed with the European model that Harvey would plow inland, stall, then head back out over the Gulf of Mexico before making a second landfall near Houston, Texas. That progression, close to what’s happening, helps explain the sustained, catastrophic rainfall that has battered the Texas coast. Human influence may prolong ocean cycle that gave birth to Harvey NOAA In Colorado, a global flood observatory keeps a close watch on Harvey’s torrents For years, U.S. forecasters have envied their colleagues at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) in Reading, U.K., whose hurricane prediction models remain the gold standard. Infamously, the National Weather Service (NWS) in 2012 failed to predict Hurricane Sandy’s turn into New Jersey, whereas ECMWF was spot on. But two innovations tested during Hurricane Harvey, one from NASA and another from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), could help level the playing field. By Paul VoosenAug. 28, 2017 , 4:24 PM Hurricane hunters fly in a modified P-3 Orion during Hurricane Harvey. center_img Email Hurricane Harvey provides lab for U.S. forecast experiments The GFDL model, called FV3, also correctly forecasted that Harvey would develop a double eyewall—a second circular band of storms around the band enclosing the eye. The model’s zoomed-in view also predicted the extreme rainfall totals seen by Houston some 5 days in advance, says Shian-Jiann Lin, the GFDL scientist who led the development of the code powering FV3. Update: Life after Harvey—scientists take stock of the damage, and their luck View of the eyewall of 2005’s Hurricane Katrina from a P-3 hurricane hunter.  Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe NOAA Related Harvey storieslast_img read more

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It can take a decade for species endangered by wildlife trade to

first_img In just a decade, the number of black-winged myna birds found in the species’ home range in Indonesia has declined by more than 80%. A big reason is the wild bird trade: The ravishing black and white plumage and bright, complex trills of the myna (Acridotheres melanopterus) have made it a coveted prize among collectors. Now, less than 50 remain in the wild.Despite the myna’s descent toward extinction, however, international policymakers have taken no steps to protect it. And according to new research, the myna’s situation is no outlier: On average, it can take 10 years for nations to agree on protections for species already known to be at risk from the wildlife trade.The study “underscores the need for quicker action to protect species threatened by the wildlife trade,” says Ginette Hemley, senior vice president of wildlife conservation at the World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C., who was not involved in the research. “Identifying this gap is a great starting point for a lot more work to come.”  Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Though elephants, rhinos, and tigers headline the trade in endangered wildlife, thousands of other lesser-known species are also hunted, captured, or maimed to turn a profit. To see whether species scientists consider imperiled are also getting attention from global policymakers, the researchers compared two lists. The first is an authoritative tally of 958 threatened species affected by the international wildlife trade compiled by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in Gland, Switzerland. The second is of species protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the primary international agreement aimed at curbing the wildlife trade.“We thought we would see tight agreement” between the IUCN and CITES lists, says Eyal Frank, an economist at the University of Chicago and co-author of the paper. But the researchers found that more than one-quarter, or 28%, of IUCN’s at-risk species are not protected under CITES, the authors report today in Science. And they found that once IUCN lists a species as threatened, it takes an average of 10 years to receive protection under CITES. Some species are still waiting, 24 years after making the IUCN list.The study suggests that while “the wildlife trade is so dynamic … the process by which we evaluate and respond to it with policy is often too slow—trade can drive a species to extinction before we realize it’s happening,” says Julie Lockwood, an ecologist from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, who was not involved in the study.These findings are not all bad news, Hemley says. CITES protects 95% of species flagged by IUCN as being most severely threatened by the wildlife trade, the researchers found.IUCN scientist Dan Challender in Oxford, U.K., says his organization has had productive conversations with CITES leadership about how to more effectively provide conservation data to CITES member countries. “We are working with CITES to close the gap this paper identifies, but these two lists are very different conservation tools—a CITES listing requires very different criteria,” Challender says.For a species to be protected by CITES, one of the member countries must recommend adding the species the protected list and the proposal must receive a two-thirds majority vote. But nations sometimes oppose a listing because of political or economic concerns. For example, proposals to ban trade in the Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) have been blocked by countries interested in continuing to catch and consume the hulking fish.CITES member countries should clear the backlog of threatened but unprotected species by creating an automatic pathway from the IUCN list to CITES proposals, argue Frank and co-author David Wilcove, an ecologist Princeton University. The authors also suggest countries should move to use IUCN’s information to unilaterally protect threatened species within their own borders.CITES members and the international conservation community will meet in May in Sri Lanka to discuss and vote on new proposals. CITES Secretary-General Ivonne Higuero says a number of the species identified by this study are among the 57 proposals set to be discussed and voted on at the meeting. The study’s findings, she adds, “provide valuable food for thought.”“CITES and the IUCN are by far some of our most important conservation institutions,” Frank says. “We are simply trying to equip both with a measure of how we are applying scientific knowledge to guide policy now and in the future.” It can take a decade for species endangered by wildlife trade to get protection Email By Alex FoxFeb. 14, 2019 , 2:00 PMcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country JOEL SARTORE/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PHOTO ARK The black-winged myna of Indonesia is one of 271 species threatened by the wildlife trade, but it has not been protected under international law.last_img read more

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Holbrook royalty

first_imgPhoto by Kellie Spangler/spanglerpics.comHolbrook High School celebrated Homecoming last Friday, crowning Cody Keyonnie as king and Makenzie Thompson as queen. Please turn to Page for more photos of the celebration. Holbrook royalty October 4, 2017center_img RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

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