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NewsAlertCdn astronaut blasts off on Russian rocket

first_imgBAIKONUR COSMODROME, Kazakhstan — Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques blasted off from Kazakhstan this morning aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket bound for the International Space Station.The 48-year-old doctor and astronaut lifted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome along with Anne McClain of NASA and Oleg Kononenko of the Russian space agency, Roscosmos.The launch appeared to go smoothly from the steppes of Kazakhstan at 6:31 a.m. eastern time.It was the first manned Russian rocket launch since a dramatic aborted Soyuz failure in October.On Oct. 11, a rocket failure forced a Soyuz capsule carrying two astronauts to abort and make an emergency landing.More coming.The Canadian Presslast_img

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Climate of impunity leads to rights violations in Afghanistan UN report

In his interim report to the UN General Assembly, Special Rapporteur Kamal Hossain calls attention to the recurrent massacres carried out within Afghanistan, calling for measures to address the climate of impunity that allows such atrocities to take place repeatedly, in defiance of Security Council directives and appeals from the international community.The report calls for an approach that addresses the Afghan crisis in all of its political, military, humanitarian and human rights dimensions. “This approach would recognize that, in the prevailing situation, the Afghan people are being denied the exercise of their right to determine their own future,” Mr. Hossain writes. Continuing external foreign interference lies at the root of the prolongation of the conflict, according to the Rapporteur, who says the Afghan people’s right to choose their form of government through an internationally acceptable mechanism must be a key element of a durable settlement. “The incentive that could encourage all segments of the Afghan population to cooperate with the international community would be the prospect of significant international support for a national plan for rehabilitation and reconstruction that would enable the millions of refugees and the internally displaced persons to return to their homes,” the report states. “[Such aid would] allow all Afghans to rebuild their lives in a unified Afghanistan where their security from external interference and non-intervention would be internationally guaranteed.” read more

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TimorLeste making progress but foreign help still crucial Annan reports

The Timorese authorities will continue to require assistance for border management and control, the development of a professional police service and of critical institutions, and the observance of democratic governance and human rights, Mr. Annan writes in his report to the Security Council on the UN Mission of Support for East Timor (UNMISET).”The achievements that the people of Timor-Leste have made in building their own country in the short period since 1999 are truly remarkable. Nevertheless, the need to continue to support Timorese institution-building efforts remains critical, so as to protect the gains made until now,” he says.”A premature termination of the tasks described above may jeopardize those very achievements as well as the significant investment that the international community has made in Timor-Leste since 1999.”The reconfigured mission would run until 20 May 2006 and include 35 military liaison officers, down from 42, and 40 police trainers, down from the current 157. The number of civilian advisers would also be reduced, to 45 from 58, while the mission would have 10 human rights officers, down from the current 14.The Secretary-General notes that the 12-month time period could be shortened if, within that time frame, bilateral and multilateral arrangements are identified to assume the critical responsibilities currently performed by UNMISET. At the same time, the number of personnel in the downsized mission could be further reduced when persons provided under those arrangements become available to take over those tasks. read more

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Fake priest tried to approach Schumacher in hospital

first_imgA PERSON DRESSED as a priest, reportedly a journalist, tried to approach Michael Schumacher who is in a coma and critical after a ski accident, his manager said.“There have been several interesting incidents here at the hospital,” Sabine Kehm told reporters in the French city of Grenoble, where the Formula One legend is being treated following his off-piste accident on Sunday.“There apparently was a person dressed-up as a priest, who tried to get near Michael. I am asking everyone to let the doctors work and leave the family spend peaceful time with Michael.”Responding to a question as to whether the priest was a journalist, she said: “It’s what I was told… We have clearly noted that people are trying to get beyond the press room here in the clinic. It’s revolting, in my opinion.”Schumacher has been a coma since Sunday, when he was helicoptered to hospital after hitting his head on a rock while skiing off-piste in the upmarket resort of Meribel with his son.Doctors said today that after a second operation to remove bleeding from his brain, he showed slight improvement but remained in a critical and fragile state.© – AFP 2013‘Slight improvement’ in Schumacher’s condition after two-hour operationlast_img read more

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Normalcy will not return to Kanilai unless all are safe to…

first_imgThe nation should know that normalcy has still not returned to Kanilai because the village looks like it is under surveillance.It is therefore important for the state to remove the curfew and leave the villagers who fear arrest to return to their homes since those arrested have been granted bail and have returned to their homes without any reaction from them. This confirms that the incident is a source of lesson. What we need to find out is the lesson that the people need to learn and that the state ought to gather so that problems could be solved without the recurrence of the tragedy of death.It is necessary not to blow this incident out of proportion. Crises are managed and resolved in the best of manners through methods that foster reconciliation and justice. We hope such methods will be adopted.last_img read more

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Injured motorist recovering at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center

first_imgA 19-year-old Vancouver man who lost control of his car last month and struck a tree off state Highway 500 has improved from critical condition to satisfactory.Benjamin James Root is at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center, a nursing supervisor said Thursday.Root was transported to the medical center on Aug. 22 with severe head injuries, according to a bulletin from the Washington State Patrol.Root was driving west on state Highway 500 in the Proebstel area when he lost control of his 1995 Honda Accord, crossed the center line, left the road and ran into a tree, the bulletin said.The accident was caused by speeding, according to the WSP. No citation was issued.last_img

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Workplace lead rules rarely enforced at gun ranges

first_imgLocal angle:In April 2010, Clark County Public Health advised parents to not let children go to the Vancouver Rifle and Pistol Club until it improved its ventilation and cleaning.Eight young members had registered lead levels in their blood above 10 micrograms per deciliter. One of the eight children had a level just above 20.According to the CDC, lead can cause organ damage and other problems at levels as low as 10 micrograms.The Orchards-area shooting club made significant improvements to address concerns about lead exposure, county public health officer Dr. Alan Melnick said in February 2011.County health officials rescinded a recommendation that pregnant members and members younger than 18 not participate in shooting, except for children whose lead levels remained elevated.Melnick said that carpets and canvas mats that harbored lead dust were cleaned and gun safes were relocated to minimize the chance lead dust would be brought into the clubhouse area. The club’s ventilation system was sufficiently improved, Melnick said.Elsewhere online:For the entire “Loaded with Lead” series: www.seattletimes.com/gunrangeslast_img read more

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Preparing Your ELists for the Rental Market

first_imgPublishers’ growing urgency to get their marketing messages in front of audiences in a more economical and immediate way has caused e-mail lists to become hot commodities on the rental market. But not every list is created equal. In order for publishers to generate a substantial revenue stream, the lists in question must be well maintained and competitively priced.Canon Communications has approximately 14 magazines and tradeshows, as well as 100 e-newsletters. In addition to its individual lists, the company also has an internal masterfile with about 730,000 e-mail addresses collected over the past six years. According to audience development director Leonard Roberto, the key to a good e-list for Canon is the open rates for its e-newsletters. “We don’t send all of our products to every address we have,” he says. “We mine the database for just those people who have opened and clicked through that particular product. So instead of sending a product to 20,000, we end up only e-mailing those 10,000 that have opened and clicked. We get a far better result that way.”Rates on the RiseRoberto says open rates have neared 35 percent and clickthrough rates have been in the high single digits percentwise. Canon has also seen success with getting its customers to opt-in to receive e-mails. “It’s really all about treating the e-newsletters just like the print publications,” he says. “When we’re on the phone with a customer for a print renewal, we’ll just add a quick line for our telemarketers to say: ‘We have a new newsletter that you might be interested in, would you like to receive it?’ It’s a great time to do this because you have a captive audience.” Roberto says it’s important to have an established bounce rule—a set number of times that an e-mail is sent to an address that bounces it back before that address is removed from the list. But having a bounce rule that’s too low may cause a problem. “For our daily e-newsletter lists, we recently increased our bounce rule to 10,” he says. “We took into account the fact that the recipients might be away or might be having a problem with their accounts. Raising it prevents us from taking those addresses off in error.”Canon has also seen success with aggregating its products into a masterfile with appended demographics such as company size, number of employees and recency. “I would shy away from lists that weren’t updated in the past year,” he says. “I would also want the ability to select by job title and function. If these options weren’t available, I would move on.” SIDEBARThe High Cost of Renting E-mail Listsby Jane ZaremWhile most companies are prepared to pay a pretty penny to rent e-mail names, others find that fact quite surprising. According to Jen O’Brien, senior account executive at Statlistics, some clients expect e-mail rental lists to cost less, because the cost of deployment—typically $100-$120 per thousand—is so much cheaper than for postal mail. “They’re often surprised to learn that, in some cases, the price can be double that of a postal list,” she says, “although all prices are negotiable at this point due to the economy.” She also suggests negotiating multi-channel pricing to interest clients in at least trying e-mail.In the past few months, however, the differential for renting a b-to-b e-mail list has dropped to a mere 10-15 percent premium over the cost of renting a comparable direct mail list, according to Jay Schwedelson, corporate VP at Worldata. “On the consumer side, the cost of an e-mail list can be even less than a comparable direct mail list,” he says. “I expect prices to come down even more in the next 12 months.”E-mail rental lists are more expensive than postal lists primarily because they have fewer names, they’re harder to keep up to date, and the universe shrinks very quickly. A list with 10,000 postal names, for example, might include as few as 3,000 e-mail addresses, which are further whittled down by bounces and undeliverables. Otherwise, list brokers handle e-mail lists much like postal lists, in that the list owner must approve the order, gets to see a sample of the creative, and reserves the right to deny renting the names for the renter’s particular purpose. And like postal lists, the best, highest quality, top-performing e-mail lists have good hygiene, the selects are controlled and targeted, and use is limited so people don’t receive too many offers too frequently.Be prepared, however, for low response rates. “If we’re testing a rented e-list, we usually take the minimum 5,000 names,” according Kelsey Voss, senior director, audience marketing, Ziff Davis Enterprise, who says that her response rates average only around 2 percent when using rented names. “And with a rented e-list, you must really target properly and be very careful with your selects. You need to make sure you don’t buy, say, 50,000 names and then get a 1 percent conversion rate. That would be the same as using direct mail.”last_img read more

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Hearst To Convert All Sites to HTML5

first_img“This project has allowed us to create a number of formats, templates and essentially code bases that we can now apply to future redesigns and upgrades to all the sites in the network,” he said. “Our plan is to [upgrade] as quickly as possible because we really believe in this multi-platform access feature.”The Good Housekeeping website was one of the first digital portals that was designed and built for the Hearst network and was “badly in need of updating,” Weinberg said, which is why the publisher selected the brand to be the first with HTML5 integration.“This was a great opportunity for us to go from sort of a state of affairs that was performing well but not particularly functioning all that well for us, to a state of the art website,” he said.The Good Housekeeping website, with the new platform, can now be displayed and function well on almost every platform, which includes traditional computer browsers, mobile devices and tablets. NEW YORK—Hearst Magazines is aiming to improve its digital strategy through the integration of HTML5, the company announced plans early Tuesday to implement the platform on the majority of its websites through out the fourth quarter of 2011 and into 2012, according to Mark Weinberg, vice president of programming and product strategy for Hearst Digital Media.The platform’s integration with the brand has begun with a complete redesign and relaunch of GoodHousekeeping.com, which was once named one of the worst magazine websites on the Internet. The newly revamped site, which went live five days ago and was designed over the last year, is now compatible with the majority of all commonly used devices.“This project forms the basis for the kind of site structure that we expect to roll out to the rest of the network over the next six to 18 months,” Weinberg told reporters during a walk through of the new website in the Hearst App Lab. “We have a number of sites that we’re in the process of redesigning and relaunching now and they will be relaunched fundamentally on the same kind of code base of HTML5 and they will designed to be multi-platform. The kind of innovations we’ve baked into the Good Housekeeping relaunch will drive where we go with the rest of the network sites.” This is also the first version of GoodHousekeping.com that is completely integrated with social networking platforms. If a user comments on an article it will also be posted on the reader’s personal Facebook page, an attempt to drive traffic to the site. Google’s +1 social networking buttons are also integrated in the new site. GoodHousekeeping.com also has new categories like “Holidays” and “Product Reviews” as well. A new promotional player, or rotator, is featured on the site’s homepage and is now highly functional in the new format. According to a spokesperson for Hearst, the titles acquired in the Hachette deal will be the first properties to undergo the change, with the company’s staple brands to follow.center_img Some of the new features of the website include all of the Good Housekeeping Research Institute’s product reviews and test results—about 1,200 are currently available and by the end of 2011 around 3,000 will be accessible. Over time, all of the reviews in the archive will be integrated, which are offered to users for free through a new navigable tool. “This slide show or rotator is touch enabled, depending on the device you’re using, and that’s one of the things that’s wonderful with HTML5,” says Eric Gillin, group director for Hearst Digital Media, who spent about six months on the sites redesign. “We can use HTML5 to have it work the way we would like it to work depending on the device the reader has.”The touch screen enabled promotional player is one of the features that will begin to roll out across the network of Hearst sites in the near future. Overall, the new platform provides a greater fluidity between the magazine’s website and its apps. “The site is based on HTML5 which is more comprehensively used in this site than practically any other media site that we know of,” Weineberg said. “This site has boldly gone into a design that is based on HTML5—this creates for us for the first time a site that is fully multi-platform.”last_img read more

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Leak Reveals Time Inc Editorial Rating Method

first_imgImage credit: Gawker Time Inc. disputes those claims, however. Company spokesman Scott Novak says in a statement that the spreadsheet was created in order to justify layoffs to the Newspaper Guild of New York, and adds that “The Guild’s interpretation is misleading and takes one category out of context.” He goes on to say that the evaluation “encompasses all of the natural considerations for digital media. It starts and ends with journalistic expertise, while including reach across all platforms and appeal to the marketplace.” Yesterday, Gawker released a spreadsheet leaked from Time Inc.’s Sports Illustrated brand. The document is said to be an editorial performance chart, but one metric has raised concerns about how the company graded its writers–”Produces content that [sic] beneficial to advertiser relationship.” What’s more, the document, which contains 8 criterions, was allegedly used to determine which editors to layoff during a massive house cleaning in February.This is not the first time over the past year the company has been criticized for its abandonment of the industry’s implicit church-and-state policy. Last fall, several months prior to its spinoff from Time Warner, Time Inc. CEO Joe Ripp symbolically tore down the invisible wall between sales and editorial when he reorganized the company so editorial reports to the business unit. It was a polarizing decision; some opponents claimed it would mark the beginning of the end for editorial integrity, while others saw it as a natural progression–and not unlike other industry models, including Meredith’s. Nevertheless, the Sports Illustrated document that leaked yesterday has reignited the debate.The KPIs in the evaluation were scored from 1 to 10+. The seven other attributes for evaluation are not unusual–Quality of Writing, Impact of Stories/Newsworthiness, Productivity/Tenacity, Audience/Traffic, Video, Social and Enthusiasm/Approach to Work. Yet, some see the advertiser appeal criteria as troubling, and even go as far as saying that it carried serious weight in determining layoffs. last_img read more

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POLICE LOG for November 22 Wilmington Man Issued Summons Deer Hunters Catch

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights from the Wilmington Police Log for Thursday, November 22, 2018:Max D. Faulkingham (21, Wilmington) was issued a summons for Operating A Motor Vehicle with a Suspended License (Subsequent Offense). (1:50am)Police came across a man near The Dance Company on Main Street who was trying to clean his windshield, but the water kept freezing. (6:19pm)Police came across a possible disabled vehicle near Jimmy’s Garage on Main Street. Upon inspection, two individuals were cutting up deer from a hunt. (6:22pm)Caller blew a tire on 93 and pulled off at exit. Caller was looking for tire change service. (10:51pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for August 5: Driver Throws Beer Bottles; Syringe Found; Woburn Man Issued Summons; Texting While DrivingIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for July 9: Police Issue 2 Summonses To Drivers; Windows Kicked In At BusinessIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 28: Dracut Woman Arrested; Lawrence Man Issued Summons; Missing RingIn “Police Log”last_img read more

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After El Paso Shooting Suburban Houston Voters Reexamine Their Own Views On

first_imgMark Ralston/AFP/Getty ImagesA woman prays at a makeshift memorial for shooting victims at the Cielo Vista Mall Walmart, in El Paso, Texas.After back-to-back mass shootings, residents in one Houston suburb are demanding members of Congress finally take action to stop a deadly trend in America.Fort Bend County is home to Sugar Land and other cities where demographics and political stripes are dramatically changing. And voters in the 22nd congressional district who have elected Republicans opposed to major gun restrictions in recent years may be considering giving a Democrat the job in 2020.It’s pressure like this from these suburban communities in other parts of the country that could shift the debate on gun measures in Congress this fall.Criticism of gun lobby“I don’t think the NRA is doing its job that it was originally set out to do. They’ve become far too strident and Second Amendment — more guns, screw everybody else,” said Fort Bend County resident Tom, a longtime NRA member who spoke to NPR but declined to give his last name out of fear for his family’s safety. “I don’t think they are doing a good job representing us. I personally — this is really gonna get me in trouble — I personally don’t have any need for the AR- and AK-style weapons.”Tom, who made the comments from Fort Bend County gun range, thinks if high-capacity magazines behind mass shootings can’t be banned, then it’s time to ban assault-style weapons.Earlier this month, 22 were killed and more than 20 were injured at a Walmart in the border community of El Paso, Texas, by a suspected gunman from northeast Texas. The next day, nine were killed in a mass shooting that lasted less than one minute at a popular Dayton, Ohio, nightclub district.The incidents have led some Texas suburban residents who live in what was once a solidly GOP suburb to revisit their positions on gun control.Fort Bend County is now one of the most diverse counties in the country. But it wasn’t always that way.“This is crazy” When Kelly Fox first moved to Sugar Land in 1995, she was a pretty lonely Democrat in the area, which was much less ethnically diverse.By then, the last of the Texas Democratic giants, the late Gov. Ann Richards, was defeated by a rising political star from the Bush family — George W. Bush. And Republican Rep. Tom Delay, a powerful House GOP leader, represented Fox’s district.“My husband I always joke that we’re like these little blue dots in a sea of red because Fort Bend County, well Texas, you know we were blue … and things changed,” Fox said during a recent visit to a nearby farmers’ market. “Fort Bend County in particular was very, very red.”The county was largely white in the 1990s, but by 2010 it was considered the most ethnically diverse county in the state, according to Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research. By 2016, Fort Bend had an ethnic breakdown of 35 percent Anglo, 24 percent Latino, 20 percent African-American and 21 percent Asian, according to an annual study by the institute.Fort Bend County is undergoing a new political metamorphosis thanks to its newfound ethnic diversity, and with that comes increasing interest in the Democratic party. And some say it’s a symptom of a greater tide turning in Texas.Last month, Republican Rep. Pete Olson, the four-term congressman representing Fort Bend County and surrounding areas, said he was retiring. That news made the nonpartisan Cook Political Report shift the 22nd Congressional District into the “toss up” column in its ratings.Huge news for Dems: Rep. Pete Olson (R) to retire, moving #TX22 from Lean R to Toss Up at @CookPolitical. This is one of the fastest-diversifying districts in the country.— Dave Wasserman (@Redistrict) July 25, 2019Now that more Texas suburbs may be turning purple, or blue in some cases, some voters in suburban areas like Sugar Land think Democrats could have the answers in the wake of mass shootings like El Paso where 22 were left dead.Those voters say Democrats are more likely to push forward with plans to expand background checks for firearm purchases and add restrictions on assault-style weapons.“They’ve really got to look at things that they can do as preventative measures without actually taking people’s rights away. I don’t want to take all guns away because that’s not what most of us are pushing for when we talk about it,” Fox said. “It’s more like this is crazy. There are things that we could do to make it a little more difficult for people of these mindsets — that are thinking these ways — to get their hands on these weapons that can kill people in a matter of seconds.”Concerns about mental health At another Fort Bend County gun range, Air Force veteran Mike Smith says he’s worried he could lose his gun. Smith was taking his 13-year-old daughter Mikenzie shooting for the first time after a break-in at his Richmond, Texas neighborhood.Smith, who works two blue-collar jobs, is for some gun restrictions. For example, he thinks the age limit should be raised for owners of assault-style weapons. And some should undergo a psychological profile.“Do they need to raise the age limit on it? Yes. It needs to be raised to about 23, 24 and then if you’re purchasing a weapon for your child, your child needs to go through the same thing that the parent goes through,” Smith said. “Basically let’s give them a psychological exam. Not saying it’s going to be 100 percent. But let’s give it time to see if they’re even capable of owning a weapon.”After El Paso, Eileen Huang of Sugar Land worried her community could be targeted next.She attended a recent community meeting on gun violence for a nearby Democratic congressional district searching for answers.At the forum, Huang, who is president of the Sino Professional Association, which represents Asian American business workers, asked Houston Police Department leaders for help. Huang said she wants members of her community to learn what to do if they come face-to-face with a mass shooter.The suspected shooter in El Paso is accused of targeting the border community because of its large Latino population.“If there is any training,” Huang told two Houston Police Department officials in attendance, “maybe you can host it for our community.”Houston Police Department Assistant Chief Henry Gaw told those at the forum that those are the right questions to ask.“We need everyone’s eyes and ears involved,” Gaw said. “I hate to say this, but it’s not a matter of ‘if’ it’s going to happen, it’s just a matter of ‘when’ and we just have to be very prepared to mitigate any casualties that might happen.”“We’ve got to do better by each other”Rhonda Scott just moved from Ohio, the state where another recent mass shooting left nine dead, to the Stafford, Texas, area to be with her son.Stafford is also in the 22nd congressional district.Scott is not a fan of President Trump or what she described as his racially charged rhetoric. She wants to see lawmakers take real action on mass shooters, and stop the language that may be driving them to kill others.“It’s sad that the way we’re going right now, you have to look over my shoulder,” Scott said. “You want to try and enjoy an events outdoor event, and it shouldn’t have to be this way.”Visiting a the farmers’ market next to a bustling First Colony Mall, Fox says she’s continuing to educate herself on the politics of her district and the issues that matter to her most, like gun control.Fox is also not a fan of Trump, and worries that his rhetoric has fueled a divisiveness and a rise in the language of hate.For example, she’s proud that Fort Bend County Independent School District schools are designated “No Place For Hate” by the international Anti-Defamation League.“I feel like government can work in a positive way in people’s lives … Maybe that’s idealistic and naive, but I feel like that is the purpose of government,” Fox said. “So everything is happening now just kind of strengthens that feeling. It just makes me want to dig my heels in and say, ‘You know, we’ve got to do better by each other. And for our country as a whole.’”Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org. Sharelast_img read more

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8th Grader Finds Success Despite Adversity

first_imgSchool has become a solace for Warren King, a 13-year-old boy living in the Parkland Apartments in Southeast D.C. He has seen more tragedy in his life than most adults.King said he dives into his work and activities at Johnson Middle School, which is about an eight minute walk from his home, so he doesn’t think about the hardship he’s facing — and it’s is paying off.Warren King receives an award from D.C. Attorney General Karl RacineD.C. Attorney General Karl Racine in September honored the eighth grader with a Right Direction Award, which recognizes local youths who show self-improvement and serve as role models to other children while giving back to their communities.Winners received certificates and a copy of Slugg: A Boy’s Life in the Age of Mass Incarceration. This year, 34 children won the third-annual award.According to Cameron Windham, community engagement coordinator for Racine’s office, the office was not only impressed with King’s story of redemption, but with who he is as a young man.“We were moved by his story and what he’s overcome,” Windham told the AFRO.The mild-mannered teenager aspires to be a computer engineer when he grows up, and said he wants to work as an IT intern in Racine’s office next summer, a move that will give him valuable experience in the tech world.“It’s important for what I want to do so I can be successful,” King told the AFRO.King was born in Riverdale, Md. and bounced between there and the District while his father served a stint in prison. In 2015, his 32-year-old mother died of breast and lung cancer, so King lived with multiple family members, which meant he had to transfer schools.When King arrived at Johnson Middle School for sixth grade, he had a difficult time adjusting. He was suspended for fighting and his grades took a nosedive.Today, things are looking up for the teen.His father, Gregory, has since been released from prison and moved to the District. King lives with him and four siblings in a two-bedroom apartment. King maintains a 3.38 grade point average — on a 4.0 scale — and tutors classmates in Algebra, reading and Spanish. He is also on the school honor roll and his test scores are improving, Lavanya Poteau, the school’s director of strategy and logistics, told the AFRO.She nominated King for the Right Direction Award because he’s always looking out for others. In her nomination form, she recalled watching King volunteer to carry an elderly woman’s food all the way home from the Capital Food Bank.“The woman hesitates and then acquiesces,” Poteau wrote on the nomination form. “She informs him that the bags are heavy as they walk to her home. He nods, smiles and lets her know it’s OK. Helping her is nothing new to Warren; he is used to being responsible and looking out for others.”At school, staff said they often select King as an ambassador at events because he’s always willing to help and understands the tasks at hand. He acts as a mediator to help resolve student disputes and is enrolled in a program that teaches him about life skills and grooms him for college.King said he doesn’t like dwelling on the past and has his sights set on the future.He’s enrolled in D.C. Public Schools’ middle school study abroad program, which takes eighth graders on fully funded trips for a week.King doesn’t yet know where he will go, but sample trips listed on the website take students to Costa Rica, Spain, Ecuador, China, Paris and other destinations.“Warren was definitely one of those students we could see moving forward,” Poteau said.last_img read more

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Apple Warns New Tariffs Would Impact iPhones iPads Macs

first_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Technology companies like Apple have in the past been able to get their products exempted from these tariffs, allowing them to keep the prices for consumer electronics products steady. In its filing, Apple stopped short of saying that it would have to raise prices for products like the iPhone and the iPad.However, it suggested that tariffs would have a major impact on its ability to contribute to the U.S. economy. The company also said that tariffs would impede Apple’s ability to compete globally.“The Chinese producers we compete with in global markets do not have a significant presence in the U.S. market, and so would not be impacted by U.S. tariffs,” the company said, concluding with the plea: “We urge you not to proceed with these tariffs.” Popular on Variety center_img Apple has told U.S. trade representative Robert Lighthizer in a filing that all of its major products would be impacted if the U.S. enacted a fourth round of tariffs in its escalating trade war with China. CNBC was first to report about the filing Thursday.“The proposed tariff list covers all of Apple’s major products, including iPhone, iPad, Mac, AirPods, and AppleTV, as well as the parts and batteries used to repair products in the United States,” the company said. “The proposed tariffs also cover accessories that Apple makes for these devices, such as monitors and keyboards.”The Trump administration began imposing tariffs of 25% on $200 billion worth of imports from China in May. The administration is currently reviewing imposing similar tariffs on an additional $300 billion worth of imports, which would effectively extend the tariffs to all goods currently imported from China.last_img read more

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Queer Eyes Karamo on fatherhood and why he doesnt identify as queer

first_imgKaramo | Photo: Instagram/Karamo Queer Eye’s Kamaro on fatherhood and why he doesn’t identify as queerQueer Eye’s Karamo Brown proposes to long-term partner Ian JordanElderly man charged for asking guy to ‘f**k’ him on Singapore trainRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/karamo-fatherhood/ ‘His mother is the last girl I dated when I was in high school’Karamo found out he was a father when he was 25 years old, when Jason was aged 10.Opening up about his fatherhood journey, Karamo furthermore continued: ‘His mother is the last girl I dated when I was in high school. She got pregnant and moved away and I found out about him when I was 25.‘His mom’s sister when [I was on Real World], said to him, “That’s your father,” which made him watch the show to watch me. He put it in the application that “not only does this mean a lot to me because my dad was on it, but the first time I even saw my dad was when he was on The Real World.”’Karamo also adopted Jason’s half brother Chris in 2010, to keep the siblings together.Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . TV star Karamo Brown has admitted he and his Queer Eye cast mates don’t identify as queer. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Karamo first appeared on Real World: Philadelphia in 2004. Now, Jason is considering joining the MTV show. ‘I thought he was joking…but he showed me the application,’ says Karamo. ‘He literally applied and sent his application off.’ ‘I don’t [describe myself as queer],’ he says. ‘I describe myself as gay – I come from an old school where gay used to be a negative. It’s not negative anymore to me.’The father-of-two was speaking to Marc Malkin on Facebook Live when he made the revelation.‘I identify as a gay man’He furthermore added: ‘Through the years, I understand the reclaiming the power with it, but queer is more an umbrella that encompasses so many other people and for me, I identify as a gay man. I have a lot of friends who identify as queer. I don’t know if any of the guys on [Queer Eye] identify as gay.’He also added: ‘None of us identify as queer. I don’t know about Jonathan, We never asked if Jonathan identifies as queer. I know that me, Bobby and Tan identify as gay men. Antoni identifies as a gay man… I don’t know what Jonathan identifies as. I would assume gay but I don’t know.’In his latest interview, the 37-year-old also reveals that his 21-year-old son Jason might follow in his footsteps and enter reality TV. eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) GAYSTARNEWS-last_img read more

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first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. The release of McKesson’s Horizon Medical Imaging 11.8 picture archiving and communications system (PACS) allows for a smoother workflow by combining critical results reporting, communications notes and peer review functions into one workstation. The critical results tool is designed to help radiologists meet hospital policy and Joint Commission requirements. For more information: www.mckesson.com Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Women’s Health View all 62 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Technology Reports View all 9 items Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Information Technology View all 220 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform.center_img Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. 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Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Videos | June 27, 2011 McKesson – Critical Results Reporting Enhanced Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise.last_img read more

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US Supreme Court ends the net neutrality debate by rejecting the 2015

first_imgYesterday, the United States Supreme Court refused the request by the telecommunications industry against net neutrality. This indicated a formal end to the legal fight over a 2016 lower court decision. This upheld the Obama-era, net neutrality rules which ensures a free and open internet. The 2015 Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) order to impose internet neutrality rules and strictly regulate broadband was already reversed by Trump’s pick for FCC chairman, Ajit Pai. Trump’s government had repealed the request with regards to net neutrality in 2017. But the justice’s action does not revoke the 2017 repeal of the policy. The rules supported by former US President Barack Obama, intended to safeguard equal access to content on the internet, were opposed by President Donald Trump. “According to the Supreme Court announcement, Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, and Neil Gorsuch would grant the petitions, vacate the judgment of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (which upheld the FCC’s internet neutrality order), and remand to that court with instructions to dismiss the cases as moot.” Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Brett Kavanaugh, a judge on the US Court of appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, recused themselves from the case. In 2017, Brett Kavanaugh dissented from the ruling upholding net neutrality rules, arguing that the rules violate the First Amendment rights of Internet service providers by preventing them from “exercising editorial control” over Internet content. FCC’s thoughts on net neutrality FCC is defending its net neutrality repeal against a lawsuit filed by dozens of litigants, including 22 state attorneys general, consumer advocacy groups, and tech companies. California State Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), author of the net neutrality law, supported California Attorney General Xavier Becerra’s decision. Wiener said: Of course, I very much want to see California’s net neutrality law go into effect immediately, in order to protect access to the Internet. Yet, I also understand and support the Attorney General’s rationale for allowing the DC Circuit appeal to be resolved before we move forward to defend our net neutrality law in court. After the DC Circuit appeal is resolved, the litigation relating to California’s internet neutrality law will then move forward. Even Ajit Pai, the FCC chairman appreciated the court’s statement. FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, who backed the net neutrality order in 2015, said on Twitter that “the commission had actually petitioned the Supreme Court to erase history and wipe out an earlier court decision upholding open internet policies. But today the Supreme Court refused to do so.” The legal battle over net neutrality might still continue and could possibly reach the Supreme Court again in a separate case. Senior counsel John Bergmayer of consumer advocacy group Public Knowledge said, “The Supreme Court decision is a good news for supporters of internet neutrality because it means that the DC Circuit court’s previous decision upholding both the FCC’s classification of broadband as a telecommunications service, and its rules prohibiting broadband providers from blocking or degrading Internet content, remains in place. Much of the current FCC’s argument against net neutrality depends on ignoring or contradicting the DC Circuit’s earlier findings, but now that these are firmly established as binding law, the Pai FCC’s case is on even weaker ground than before.” The new FCC rules that went into effect in June, gave internet service providers greater power to regulate the content that customers access. Though they are now the subject of a separate legal fight after being challenged by many groups that backed net neutrality. The net neutrality repeal turned out to be good for providers like Comcast Corp, AT&T Inc and Verizon Communications Inc. It was opposed by internet companies like Amazon.com Inc, Facebook Inc, and Alphabet Inc as the repeal could lead to higher costs. Read more about this news on arstechnica. Read more on the court’s announcement, check on the supreme court’s official website. Read Next The U.S. Justice Department sues to block the new California Net Neutrality law California’s tough net neutrality bill passes state assembly vote Spammy bots most likely influenced FCC’s decision on net neutrality repeal, says a new Stanford studylast_img read more

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Google IO 2019 Flutter UI framework now extended for Web Embedded and

first_imgAt the ongoing 2019 Google I/O, Google made a major overhaul to its Flutter UI framework. Flutter is now expanded from mobile to multi-platform. The company released the first technical preview of Flutter for web. The core framework for mobile devices was also upgraded to Flutter 1.5. For desktop, Flutter is being used as an experimental project. It is not production-ready, but the team has published early instructions for developing  apps to run on Mac, Windows, and Linux. An embedding API for Flutter is also available that allows it to be used in scenarios for home and automotives. Google notes, “The core Flutter project has been making progress to enable desktop-class apps, with input paradigms such as keyboard and mouse, window resizing, and tooling for Chrome OS app development. The exploratory work that we did for embedding Flutter into desktop-class apps running on Windows, Mac and Linux has also graduated into the core Flutter engine.” Flutter for Web Flutter for web allows web-based applications to be built using the Flutter framework. Per Google, with Flutter for web you can create “highly interactive, graphically rich content,” though it plans to continue evolving this version with a “focus on performance and harmonizing the codebase.” It allows developers to compile existing Flutter code written in Dart into a client experience that can be embedded in the browser and deployed to any web server. Google teamed up with the New York Times to build a small puzzle game called Kenken as an early example of what can be built using Flutter for Web. This game uses the same code across Android, iOS, the web and Chrome OS. Source: Google Blog Flutter 1.5 Flutter 1.5 hosts a variety of new features including updates to its iOS and Material widget and engine support for new mobile devices types. The latest release also brings support for Dart 2.3 with extensive UI-as-code functionality. It also has an in-app payment library which will make monetizing Flutter based apps easier. Google also showcased an ML Kit Custom Image Classifier, built using Flutter and Firebase at Google I/O 2019. The kit offers an easy-to-use app-based workflow for creating custom image classification models. You can collect training data using the phone’s camera, invite others to contribute to your datasets, trigger model training, and use trained models, all from the same app. Google has also released a comprehensive new training course for Flutter, built by The App Brewery. Their new course is available for a time-limited discount from $199 to just $10. Netizens had trouble acknowledging Google’s move and were left wondering as to whether Google wants people to invest in learning Dart or Kotlin. For reference, Flutter is entirely built in Dart and Google made two major announcements for Kotlin at the Google I/O. Android development will become increasingly Kotlin-first, and Google announcing the first preview of Jetpack Compose, a new open-source UI toolkit for Kotlin developers. A comment on Hacker News reads, “This is massively confusing. Do we invest in Kotlin …or do we invest in Dart? Where will Android be in 2 years: Dart or Kotlin?” In response to this, another comment reads, “I don’t think anyone has a definite answer, not even Google itself. Google placed several bets on different technologies and community will ultimately decide which of them is the winning one. Personally, I think native Android (Kotlin) and iOS ( Swift) development is here to stay. I have tried many cross-platform frameworks and on any non-trivial mobile app, all of them cause more problem than they solve.” Another said, “If you want to do android development, Kotlin. If you want to do multi-platform development, flutter.” “Invest in Kotlin. Kotlin is useful for Android NOW. Whenever Dart starts becoming more mainstream, you’ll know and have enough time to react to it”, was another user’s opinion. Read the entire conversation on Hacker News. Read Next Google launches Flutter 1.2, its first feature update, at Mobile World Congress 2019 You can now permanently delete your location history and web and app activity data on Google Microsoft Build 2019: Microsoft showcases new updates to MS 365 platform with a focus on AI and developer productivitylast_img read more

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China says 14 guilty of pollution protest violence

first_img Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day Top Stories 3 international destinations to visit in 2019 Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Associated PressBEIJING (AP) – Fourteen people pleaded guilty to encouraging a riot in eastern China last year in which the local Communist Party chief was stripped half-naked in a mass protest that ultimately forced the local government to scrap a wastewater treatment project.The official Xinhua News Agency said the defendants were prosecuted Wednesday on charges of encouraging mass violence against government buildings and intentionally damaging property in the city of Qidong in Jiangsu province north of Shanghai. Scores of police were hurt in the melee. Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix 5 treatments for adult scoliosis Comments   Share   center_img Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Pollution has become a major cause of unrest in China, where the growing middle class have become more outspoken in their opposition to environmentally risky projects.Last year, the Chinese also staged large-scale protests against a proposed copper plant in the southwestern province of Sichuan and a planned expansion of a petrochemical factory in the eastern province of Zhejiang. Like the Qidong project, the other two were eventually scrapped.In Qidong, thousands of people upset with the wastewater treatment project stormed the Qidong municipal government compound and turned at least one police car on its side at the protest on July 28.Citing court documents, the state-run Southern Metropolis Daily from southern China said the defendants forcibly broke through the police cordon to attack and to smash government buildings, injuring at least 90 police officers, damaging several cars and causing property loss of more than 230,000 yuan ($37,000).It also said the city’s party chief was stripped half-naked after he refused to wear a T-shirt boycotting the project while the mayor was forced to wear such a T-shirt.The protesters were worried that the wastewater from the Japanese company Oji Paper in upstream Nantong city would not be cleaned enough before being discharged into the sea near Qidong, although Oji had assured the wastewater would be properly treated. Sponsored Stories The sentences will be announced later, Xinhua said.The case has prompted accusations that authorities are retaliating against the protesters after initially conceding to their demands by canceling the project.“We admit that radical acts were committed, but that was because mere protesting would not have forced the government to change,” said Zhang Peihong, a Shanghai-based lawyer who represents defendant Zhu Baosheng.Zhu is accused of smashing a clock in the lobby of the municipal government’s office building, pouring looted liquor from the roof of a car and forcing a city official to wear a shirt emblazoned with pro-environmental slogans.Zhang said he argued in court that the case failed to take into account negligence on the part of local officials.“We see no sincerity on behalf of the state,” the lawyer said.Government actions leading up to such protests need to be examined and wrongdoing exposed, said Liu Shanying, a political scientist at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.“You must investigate both sides, but in this case, we haven’t seen any scrutiny directed at the officials involved,” Liu said.Despite that, unlawful acts such as assault and destruction of property must be punished, he added. “You should defend your rights within the law.” The difference between men and women when it comes to pain The grass-roots protests reflect the balancing act Chinese leaders are performing between maintaining public stability and pushing economic growth, and between local officials who want to attract industry and a public who do not want it in their neighborhoods.(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)last_img read more

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by Dirk Meissner The Canadian Press Posted Se

first_img by Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press Posted Sep 15, 2018 4:00 am PDT Last Updated Sep 15, 2018 at 4:20 am PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email VICTORIA – Matilda Borden liked to pour a cup of tea to display her basket making expertise, proving her cups made from material gathered in British Columbia’s forests were watertight, says her granddaughter Brenda Crabtree.Not one drop would leak, recalls Crabtree, who is also a basket-making artist and Aboriginal programs director at Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver.“She was showing off and it’s really, truly the mark of a master weaver,” she said of her grandmother who died in 1975.Among First Nations, basket weavers have always been held in high regard, said John Haugen of the Nlaka’pamux Nation from B.C.’s Fraser Canyon.“If you were a good basket maker and somebody else wanted your baskets they would have food to trade with you or other items.”Now the baskets are gaining more notice than just being functional works of art.Canada recognized Nlaka’pamux basket making for its national historic significance this month with a ceremony at Lytton, about 265 kilometres northeast of Vancouver.“Historic designations reflect Canada’s rich and varied history and I encourage all Canadians to learn more about Nlaka’pamux basket making and its important contributions to Canada’s heritage,” said Jati Sidhu, Mission-Matsqui-Fraser Canyon MP, on behalf of Catherine McKenna, the minister responsible for Parks Canada.Andrea Laforet, retired director of ethnology and cultural studies at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, said the making, use and trading of coiled basketry has been part of the history of the Indigenous Peoples of the southern Interior of B.C. and parts of Washington state for centuries, if not thousands of years.“Like many of the utilitarian objects made in Indigenous societies in B.C., they are also works of art,” said Laforet, who attended the ceremony in Lytton.The baskets served as vital trade commodities for Indigenous Peoples in the Fraser Canyon area before and following contact with non-Indigenous people, Haugen said.“We knew we were prolific basket makers and our baskets were traded outside of our nation prior to contact,” said Haugen, who said war canoes from Vancouver Island made the voyage up the Fraser River to Spuzzum on trade missions.The baskets made by Nlaka’pamux women provided economic support for families and communities from about 1850 to 1930 when they were traded in nearby non-Indigenous communities, he said.Today, the baskets are on display in museums around the world and are coveted pieces at auctions, said Haugen, whose aunts were well-known basket makers, and his mother was an avid collector who often helped local people sell their work to collectors.Borden was also part of the Nlaka’pamux Nation, and Crabtree said some of her earliest memories are of helping her grandmother harvest, process and weave cedar roots and bark into baskets.“I love the fact that this form of basketry has been recognized as really, truly, technically amazing,” she said.She said the baskets served as items for cooking, storing and transporting food as well as being expressions of art by local women.“We never really developed a pottery complex in the northwest coast because we didn’t need it,” she said. “People think how can you cook with just a cedar root basket? Well, you fill them with water and put hot rocks from fires into the basket. It would steam the food.”Crabtree said her most recent works of basketry include cultural commentary woven into the object. She said one of her baskets includes the residential school policy statement: “Kill the Indian in the child.”“I’m really using our baskets now as a vehicle for a discussion related to aboriginal identity and contemporary issues,” she said. “They can hold water, cook, and have an added message.”Retired ethnobotanist Nancy Turner, who wrote extensively about Interior basket making, said the baskets embodied the lifestyle of the Interior peoples.“They say if you are making a basket you should never be in a bad mood,” she said. “You should never get angry. You should be of good mind because the basket you are making will pick up on your own sense of well being.”Turner said students soon learned her courses in basket making were not as easy as imagined.“People will sometimes talk about ‘Basket Making 101’ if you’re taking a simple course at university, but when I taught ethnobotany at University of Victoria, I had the students do a making-things project,” she said. “The students soon learned it’s not at all simple.” Brenda Crabtree, Director of Aboriginal Programs at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, poses for a photograph at the school in Vancouver, on Friday September 14, 2018. Crabtree, who is a basket making artist, says her late grandmother Matilda Borden liked to pour a cup of tea to display her basket making expertise, proving her cups made from material gathered in British Columbia’s forests were watertight. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck center_img Canada says B.C. Indigenous basket making an event of historic significancelast_img read more

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