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Construction Industry Consultation

first_imgA Fort St. John construction industry consultation meeting is set to begin a five o’clock this afternoon, at the Quality Inn/Northern Grand Hotel. Local area stakeholders involved in the industrial, commercial and institutional construction industry are encouraged to participate.The Construction Industry Training Organization says the meeting will begin, with a presentation on the first draft of the organization’s operating model.- Advertisement -That will be followed by a discussion on the model’s priorities, additions, funding and consultation process.last_img

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Calderon may be the best Chavez repellent

first_imgWhile addressing rising crime takes a back seat to Bush-bashing in Caracas, Calderon began his term by dispatching federal forces to crack down on violent drug gangs. He launched lofty job goals that would focus on building up Mexico and offering more opportunities as a true answer to the never-ending shuffle of workers crossing the northern border. He believes in free markets and free ideas, and has already done more to clean up Mexico than Fox ever did. Who’s the guy who really cares about the future of Latin America? Moreover, Calderon isn’t going to play Chavez’s name game. “I think that this little gentleman is a big ignoramus,” Chavez said in one of his many swipes at the new Mexican leader. As if heeding the advice kids are given to deal with a schoolyard bully, Calderon has brushed off continued insults as Chavez keeps blustering. In another editorial addressing these insults, Investors Business Daily noted Calderon’s promotion of the private sector, cooperation with political opponents and action against crime, adding, “The presence of a nearby leader who doesn’t shrink from a fight must be deeply unsettling to a bully like Chavez, who has big plans for extending his regional domination.” Bush once declared Vladimir Putin, the Russian president whose autocratic grip now sees that nation going the way of the Cold War, to be a man he could work with. Calderon is a man that the U.S. can – and should – work with. The best relationship will require some relatively painless give-and-take on our part – like developing and finally passing mutually beneficial immigration reform – but Bush will hopefully have seen from the rest of his tour that Calderon is needed now more than ever. Bridget Johnson writes for the Daily News. E-mail her at bridget.johnson@dailynews.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Those countries willing to drink Chavez’s red Kool-Aid are cloaking government control in the guise of economic independence and equality (which in the Bolivarian Revolution equals “eliminate poverty by making everyone poor” – a page from the Fidel Castro playbook). But not all of Latin America has bought into Chavez’s song and dance about his plan being the path to a better tomorrow. And that’s what made me think of the defeat – yes, defeat – of Lopez Obrador last fall in Mexico. Particularly in the volatile political climate of Latin America, for every man in black (or a ubiquitous red shirt) there’s a good guy in white. Or in this case, white, red and green. President Felipe Calderon’s stormy election battle and historically slim victory was followed by a dramatic swearing-in ceremony where opposition rabble forced him to swear and run. As the leader who looks like a mild-mannered accountant in contrast to predecessor Vicente Fox’s studly swagger, Calderon has quickly proven able to best his opponents – at 100 days into his term, Calderon has a 58 percent approval rating, as noted in recent El Universal and Reforma polls. Bush’s last stop on his six-day Latin American whirlwind was a Yucatan meeting with Calderon on Tuesday, a vacation compared with the combative atmosphere stoked fervently by Chavez to the south. As President Bush wrapped up his Latin American “Me and My Shadow” tour (the shadow being perennial detractor and anti-U.S.-rally chairman Hugo Chavez), one question initially pressed on my mind: Does Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador still think he’s really the president of Mexico? OK, there are more important questions. Like issues of free trade and American aid. Issues of poverty and illegal immigration. And which bug repellent works best to ward off pesky, buzzing Chavez. The cult of Chavez, which turned out as required to systematically burn effigies of Bush and decry the United States in general, would like the world to know that they – not development aid from outside the region – hold the key to prosperity in Latin America. Instead, the nationalist-socialist ideology pushed by Chavez’s Bolivarian Revolution is not only exacerbating the region’s problems but creating all-new ones. In the current Cuba redux, the educated masses are fleeing Venezuela in the wake of Chavez’s clampdown on private business and personal freedoms. The number of Venezuelans coming to the U.S. – doctors, teachers, businessmen and more – has jumped more than 5,000 percent since 2000. “He’s throwing away his country’s biggest treasure,” an Investors Business Daily editorial opined of Chavez’s rapid loss of needed human capital. “And, ironically, he’s throwing it right into the arms of his biggest enemy – us.” last_img read more

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RAPHOE GETS READY TO PARTY FOR DOUBLE OLYMPIAN CHLOE

first_imgSUPER: CHLOE MAGEECHLOE Magee returns to her native Raphoe tonight – with thousands expected to congregate for a special homecoming party.The double Olympian did her town, her county and her country proud in London – and is being tipped for further glory in Rio in four years time.The Raphoe girl says she’s “had a ball” at London 2012. She’s been serenaded at the closing ceremony party (you couldn’t miss her on the TV!).And she has been feted in Dublin and around the country.This evening in Raphoe it’s Donegal’s turn to say ‘well done.’A spokesman for Raphoe Badminton Club said: “The Support to Raphoe’s Double Olympian Chloe has been so amazing. “Chloe will return on Friday night to our town so come and meet and greet her and help us show her how proud we are of her and her Olympic achievements on Friday night about 8pm in the Diamond Raphoe. Everyone is welcome.” RAPHOE GETS READY TO PARTY FOR DOUBLE OLYMPIAN CHLOE was last modified: August 17th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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TRAFFIC CHAOS AS ROAD CONDITIONS WORSEN

first_imgDelays on The Gap: Pic from Elaine Montgomery for Donegal DailyTHERE is traffic chaos in many parts of Co Donegal tonight as road conditions worsen.Traffic delays of over an hour are being experienced by motorists travelling between Donegal Town and Ballybofey.There are also major delays on the Letterkenny/Lifford road, the Burnfoot to Buncrana Road and in and around Ballyshannon. The worst tailbacks have been experienced this evening in Letterkenny where there has been virtual gridlock in the town this afternoon.Gardaí have stepped up patrols and are calling on motorists to drive with caution as temperatures drop to freezing.ESB Networks meanwhile have restored power to all but 19 homes in the Donegal Town area.The company says experts will have those repairs completed at 8.15pm. It was a remarkable reconnection route; more than 12,000 homes had lost power at some stage over the past 24 hours as a storm hit Donegal.Skies will clear later, with the next weather system due to arrive tomorrow morning bringing more wintry showers. TRAFFIC CHAOS AS ROAD CONDITIONS WORSEN was last modified: December 19th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalhailicesnowtraffic delaysweatherlast_img read more

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Trojans’ success resting on Bush

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Jackson and his teammates can thank Bush, who repeatedly bailed out the Trojans in South Bend, especially with quarterback Matt Leinart struggling and tailback LenDale White in another reduced role. “I wouldn’t say he bails us out, but he turns a lot of 6-yard plays into big plays,” offensive coordinator Lane Kiffin said. Bush scored touchdowns on runs of 36, 45 and 9 yards against Notre Dame and without him, there wasn’t much difference between the Trojans and Irish. Notre Dame, in fact, actually was superior at quarterback, no matter who won the Heisman Trophy. USC has scored 24 touchdowns this season, and Bush has almost 50 percent (11). Whatever accomplishes this season, their success rests on Bush. The Trojans basked in the afterglow Sunday of their 34-31 victory over Notre Dame, which goes down as one of the most memorable of the series and probably the most memorable college football game this year. “I have never been in a game like this,” defensive end Lawrence Jackson said. “I will remember it for the rest of my life.” But even with Bush, USC coach Pete Carroll found plenty to complain about even after a thrilling victory. “We could have played a whole lot better,” Carroll said. “We gave them a lot of freebies with the penalties. (Our punt team) is terrible. I’m embarrassed. We have to deal with it. It’s terrible.” Carroll also said he’s still wondering how 16 seconds elapsed on the second-to-last play, when Leinart fumbled and left USC with seven seconds for the final play. “It couldn’t have lasted more than six or seven seconds, we should have had more than twice as much time,” he said. Scott Wolf can be reached at (818) 713-3607. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img For every reference to USC owning the greatest offense in college football history, another equally compelling comment could be made about the No. 1-ranked Trojans at the halfway mark of the season. Without tailback Reggie Bush, USC often looks like a pretty average team. last_img read more

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HSU batters Berdoo, 71-53

first_imgThe Humboldt State women picked up a much needed win Saturday night, trouncing Cal State San Bernardino (6-10, 4-8) 71-53, pulling the Jacks back above .500 to 9-8 (8-4) for the season.The Jacks controlled the pace throughout the first half, holding San Bernardino to 9 points in the first quarter and 12 points in quarter number two. The Jacks led 27-21 at halftime.After a quick couple of baskets to open the third quarter, San Bernardino pulled even with Humboldt 27-27.Humboldt then went on a …last_img

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Plants Contribute to Global Warming?

first_imgIf anyone needs a reminder that scientists still have a lot to learn, consider this major discovery of something right under their noses that caught them completely off guard.  Up to a third of methane in the atmosphere comes from plants.  This is not only a baffling puzzle about how or why plants would create such a reducing molecule in an oxic environment, but the finding will have a major impact on how scientists calculate the greenhouse-gas budget – a data point that feeds right into political negotiations over what to do about global warming.  It will also ripple back through models of earth history and climate.  (After carbon dioxide, methane is the major greenhouse gas in the atmosphere; previously, scientists thought most of it was coming from microbial activity in wetlands or cow farts – in scientific terms, the “eructations of ruminant animals.”)    The astonishment of two news reports in Nature was palpable.  Atmospheric expert David C. Lowe1 called this startling, because it is the first case of non-bacterial agents producing methane, and the amount is large: up to 30% of the annual total of methane entering earth’s atmosphere.  Methane has been a target for emission control under the Kyoto protocols, but is it possible that by planting forests in some wetland countries will make the problem worse?  They had recommended drier rice farming than flooding rice paddies with water.  Lowe asks, “could the rice plants themselves be as significant a source of methane as the flooded paddy fields?”    Quirin Schiermeier in Munich was similarly stunned.2  This finding will send scientists and politicians back to the drawing board, he said: “The newly revealed methane emissions have taken plant physiologists by surprise, because far more energy is required to create methane than, say, carbon dioxide in an oxygenated environment.”  A sidebar asked, “How could we have missed this?” and has them “wondering what else might have been overlooked if it is true.”  It could be very important, and may not be the last surprise.  It does not change the fact that atmospheric methane has doubled over the past 200 years, and does not remove the need to understand the human impact on atmospheric change, but “It means we neglected a big driving force for the climate,” remarked Martin Heimann, director of the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany, who was most surprised by the large amount of methane detected.    The discovery was made by Keppler et al. and announced in Nature.3  They said, “We suggest that this newly identified source may have important implications for the global methane budget and may call for a reconsideration of the role of natural methane sources in past climate change.”  See also the summary on EurekAlert.Update 01/19/2006: The authors issued a clarification in a Max Planck Society press release that their findings were not intended to suggest that plants cause global warming, or that reforestation efforts would be harmful.  “Emissions from plants thus contribute to the natural greenhouse effect and not to the recent temperature increase known as ‘global warming,’ they said.  “Even if land use practices have altered plant methane emissions, which we did not demonstrate, this would also count as an anthropogenic source, and the plants themselves cannot be deemed responsible.”  The authors were apparently chagrined over widespread “misinterpretation” of their findings in the news media; “The blame is not with the plants,” the press release was titled.Update: see 08/28/2006 headline.1David C. Lowe, “Global change: A green source of surprise,” Nature 439, 148-149 (12 January 2006) | doi:10.1038/439148a.2Quirin Schiermeier, “Methane finding baffles scientists,” Nature http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v439/n7073/full/439128a.html.3Keppler et al., “Methane emissions from terrestrial plants under aerobic conditions,” Nature 439, 187-191 (12 January 2006) | doi:10.1038/nature04420.CEH does not generally take positions on political issues like global warming, but two lessons stand out from this surprising discovery:(1) Plants must have some yet-to-be-discovered remarkable mechanism for producing an unlikely molecule in oxidizing conditions.  Here’s a chance for an ID-friendly researcher to find out how and why plants accomplish this feat.  Think of the possibilities for ID science: can plants teach us an efficient way to produce natural gas?  Could this bring our energy bills down?(2) There may be a lot more going on in this old world than the experts, who influence the politicians, could ever realize.  When they speak glibly about what the climate was doing umpteen gazillion years ago, take note of this startling finding that was right under their noses, right here in the present.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Star Formation Theories Fail to Shine

first_imgBig things are wrong in astrophysics, say several news articles.The laws of star formation challenged (Phys.org). Once we learn a couple of terms, we’ll see how bad the news is about star formation. IMF1 stands for the mass distribution of stars at birth. CMF2 stands for the mass distribution of cores from which they formed. Those numbers should agree, but new work “could challenge the widespread assumption that the mass distribution of a population of star-forming cores is identical to that of the stars they spawn.” Salpeter’s Law, stated by Edwin Salpeter in 1955 based on molecular clouds near our solar system, says those distributions should agree. The bad news: when astronomers look at more distant stars, they don’t. The ALMA Telescope allowed them to check the relationship for more distant stars. The implications could reverberate through astrophysics:It turned out that, in the W43-MM1 cloud, there was an overabundance of massive cores, while less massive cores were under-represented. These findings call into question not only the relationship between the CMF and the IMF, but even the supposedly universal nature of the IMF. The mass distribution of young stars may not be the same everywhere in our Galaxy, contrary to what is currently assumed. If this turns out to be the case, the scientific community will be forced to re-examine its calculations about star formation and, eventually, any estimates that depend on the number of massive stars, such as the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium, the numbers of black holes and supernovae, etc.Burst of newborn stars in young star cluster puzzles astronomers (Phys.org). Another term to learn is “blue stragglers.” These are hot blue stars that shouldn’t be where they are: they “‘straggle’ behind the natural evolution of most stars in a cluster.” Blue stars are assumed to burn up very fast. They shouldn’t exist in globular clusters, therefore, which are assumed to be very old. Those clusters are also depleted of the gas needed to form new stars. To get around this conundrum, astronomers hoped that blue stars might have formed more recently by collisions. The Chinese Academy of Sciences, using the Hubble Space Telescope, now says that explanation does not appear probable. They found an unexpected population of blue stars in a “young” globular cluster (two billion years). What does that imply? “This is surprising, because blue straggler stars in this cluster seem to have formed in a well-defined burst,” not from random collisions. It’s like they all ‘burst’ on the scene together, so to speak. A collapsing globular cluster might bring about this situation, but it shouldn’t be happening in a young cluster.“When the very cores of clusters collapse under the gravity of all the stars in that small volume of space, we witness one of the most extreme astronomical events. When this happens, the cluster becomes extremely dense and you can imagine that many stellar collisions could happen in the core region. As a result, lots of blue straggler stars could be produced. For this reason, the double sequence of blue stragglers can be expected in clusters only when they get old, older than 10 billion years,” said Dr. DENG.“However, we did not find any evidence that supports the presence of a collapsed core in this cluster. In addition, the conditions in this cluster even disfavor the occurrence of many stellar collisions,” said Dr. LI.An anonymous reviewer solicited by the editors of The Astrophysical Journal wrote, “This work certainly presents unexpected, and therefore interesting observational results… It challenges the generality of explanations put forward for other such blue straggler sequences.” (Visited 603 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Stars and HabitabilitySmall Stars are Awesome — But Can They Support Life? (Space.com). In this article, Paul Sutter (astrophysicist at Ohio State) explains why red dwarf stars (the most numerous in the universe) are unlikely candidates for hosting habitable planets. For one thing, the habitable zone is close to the star. And then, red stars tend to erupt with killer flares. If that isn’t bad enough for life, a planet in the zone would most likely become tidally locked to the star. One side would be exposed to the killer flares; the other side would face away into the freezing cold of space.Sutter takes the gamble anyway. There are so many of these stars, he says, and they last so long, a few might beat the odds. “So, even if life has trouble getting started or sticking around, there are a ridiculously high number of chances available for life to get a crack,” he says. “Your odds may not be that great at a penny slot machine in Vegas, but if you’ve got a lot of pennies you might just come out ahead.” Since the only star we know of that hosts a habitable planet is not a red dwarf, good science would like to see evidence before trying Sutter’s odds. Probability theory itself warns against reckless drafts on the bank of time. Sutter has a finite number of pennies, but he should calculate the odds of getting even one protein by chance. Watch the animation, “The Amoeba’s Journey” from the Illustra Film Origin. There isn’t enough time in the universe to try the number of rolls required to get a small protein, let alone life.Elements from the stars—the unexpected discovery that upended astrophysics 66 years ago (Phys.org). In this article, Spyrou and Schatz review the 1952 discovery of technetium in a stellar spectrum and what that meant for the future of astronomy. Technetium, having no stable forms, must have formed recently, concluded Paul Merrill working at the Mt. Wilson Observatory. This “completely unexpected” discovery led to the common secular statement, popularized by Carl Sagan, that ‘we are all made of starstuff.’On May 2, 1952, Merrill reported his discovery in the journal Science. Among the three interpretations offered by Merrill was the answer: Stars create heavy elements! Not only had Merrill explained a puzzling observation, he had also opened the door to understand our cosmic origins. Not many discoveries in science completely change our view of the world – but this one did. The newly revealed picture of the universe was simply mind-blowing, and the repercussions of this discovery are still driving nuclear science research today.The field of stellar nucleosynthesis was born, but the article reveals some incidents for historians of science to consider. Prior to 1952, astronomers assumed that all the elements were formed in the big bang. Alternative scenarios were considered, “But no one really had come up with a convincing theory for the origin of the elements – until Paul Merrill’s observation.” A convincing theory, however, should be distinguished from a true theory.Spyrou and Schatz show how the new paradigm led to the 1957 B2FH paper (Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle) that seemed to convince everyone that stars make heavy elements. But while theories can work on paper, fusion is difficult to study in the lab: “for more than six decades, nuclear physicists have continued to work to get a handle on the nuclear reactions that drive the stars.” I.e., they’re not there yet. Computer models crank out solutions, “trying to recreate the parts of the universe we see, while reaching out toward the ones that are still hiding until the next major discovery.”Could the next major discovery “upend” the last major discovery? The current theory of stellar nucleosynthesis is not without problems. The reactions up to the element iron are exothermic, therefore give off energy. The elements heavier than iron are endothermic, requiring the input of energy. Astronomers assume that supernovae will be powerful enough to supply the energy, but nobody has quite figured out how to create a supernova in the lab. The situation described in this article reminds one of Thomas Kuhn’s portrayal of scientific paradigms. Everyone in the ‘guild’ is occupied with working on the paradigm, not questioning it. The next scientific revolution could replace this paradigm of nucleosynthesis with a different one.Chalk this entry up under the Psarris title, “What you’re not being told about astronomy.” How many books, TV shows or movies have you seen that assume habitable planets are as common as dirt? How many that assume science has figured out star formation? How many that blissfully stated that globular clusters are old, with only old stars? How many that you are just starstuff? Dig a little deeper with a skeptical eye, and you often find a house of cards sitting on a foundation of sand.last_img read more

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COP17: what’s possible, what’s not

first_imgWWF South Africa believes COP17 shouldchart a road map to a low-carbon future.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free images, visit the image library) South Africa’s Minister of Water andEnvironmental Affairs Edna Molewa.(Image: Nicky Rehbock) MEDIA CONTACTS • Quathar Jacobs WWF South Africa media officer+27 21 657 6600RELATED ARTICLES• Make a pledge to save our seas• WEF Africa to punt continent’s agenda• New drive for greener cars• Brand South Africa hosts international media• Using exotic woods to tackle povertyNicky RehbockThe upcoming COP17 negotiations in Durban are unlikely to achieve a new binding international commitment to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, but it should help map out the long-term transition to a low-carbon world. Being aware of this and avoiding unrealistic expectations will be key to the event’s success.This was one of the messages relayed at a recent pre-COP17 summit in Johannesburg, backed by WWF South Africa and the National Business Initiative.Some 20 000 delegates are expected to attend the talks, which are taking place in South Africa for the first time. The country is the third in Africa to play host to a COP gathering, after Morocco in 2011 and Kenya in 2006.South Africa’s minister of water and environmental affairs Edna Molewa is expected to lead the local negotiating team at the meeting.Last chanceAmong the big issues up for discussion at COP17 is the future of the Kyoto Protocol – currently the only binding international commitment to reduce GHG emissions. The first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol ends in 2012.South Africa became a signatory to the protocol in mid-2002 and by August 2011, 191 states, including those belonging to the EU, had signed and ratified the agreement.“Durban is the last real opportunity for countries to provide certainty on a future climate regime. The first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol ends next year. The world’s citizens are waiting for a clear signal about what countries will do in a second commitment period that will help save the planet and its people,” WWF South Africa has stated.One of the challenges of the existing Kyoto Protocol is that the US, China, India and Brazil are not signatories to the treaty, and the combined GHG emissions of countries which did sign it only account for about 55% of the world’s total. This has led to widespread criticism.Certain developed countries, led by Japan and Russia, as well as developing states like South Africa, now argue that the system is unfair and environmentally ineffective.Compounding this is the fact that several signatories have admitted they probably will not be able to honour the commitment.There is general consensus that the contract should be renewed beyond 2012, but that it should have stricter conditions attached and the US, China, India and Brazil should sign too.The EU has said it would commit to a second term if others do the same. But major developed countries, including Japan, Russia and Canada, say they will only commit if developing countries do the same.“Unless developing countries are also willing to signal their readiness to take on legally binding commitments in the future, then it will be very difficult to find a solution to deal with runaway climate change. This stalemate threatens agreements on all of the other issues that urgently await decision at COP17,” WWF South Africa states.While the organisation does not expect the finalisation of a new legal framework at COP17, it does hope to “increase ambition and lay the basis for a future binding agreement”.last_img read more

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Gmail’s New API: Email as Enterprise Platform

first_imgTags:#enterprise#news#NYT#Products 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now marshall kirkpatrick Related Posts Google has announced the availability of a new Application Programming Interface (API) that allows 3rd party services to offer contextually relevant content and functionality inside the email interface of Google Apps Gmail users. It’s just the latest sign that the email sector is heating up again. If you’ve noticed the way that certain Google properties like YouTube and Picassa have been treated differently when linked-to inside an email viewed in Gmail (both have resulted in video or image previews for the past few months) then you’ve got some idea how other applications can now relate to the contents of your mail. Now imagine other parts of an email being built on top of by a developer ecosystem. The potential here is very exciting.Email remains a rich and important platform for communication, now Google hopes it will become a platform for development too. The API will for now be limited to Gmail for Google Apps, where it can be deployed to entire groups by an Apps customer via the Google Apps Marketplace. A related move in the consumer version of Gmail came this Spring, when the company launched OAuth for IMAP. Earlier this morning the company announced the availability of new automating scripts for Google Apps as well.Ten services have been selected as launch partners and offer all the more indication of the possibilities.In Google’s words:Several new contextual gadget integrations for Gmail are available to Google Apps customers in the Apps Marketplace today:AwayFind lets you mark certain contacts or message topics as ‘Urgent’ and then alerts you via phone, SMS or IM when relevant messages arrive.Kwaga displays social network profiles and lists recent email exchanges with people you correspond with.Gist brings together information from across the web about people you’re corresponding with, providing rich person and company profiles, news and updates.Pixetell detects email links to video messages created with Pixetell’s video software and lets you preview, comment on, and share those videos without leaving your inbox.Smartsheet lets you access and update entries in Smartsheet’s sales pipeline and project management tool.Xobni, Rapportive, Manymoon, Newmind Group, and BillFLO have also launched their own contextual gadget integrations.Email is HotEmail may be tried and true, but it’s also a hot area for development these days. Good old Hotmail topped the news yesterday with a new version, for example. Over at Yahoo! there have been Mail APIs for years, though they’ve primarily been used internally to add new social features to Yahoo! Mail. That may change soon as well, however, as Yahoo’s Eran Hammer-Lahav, celebrated community leader in developing the OAuth mashup protocol, has recently shifted his focus to doing open standards development under the Yahoo! Mail department. Access restrictions to the Yahoo! Mail API were just lifted last month.Disclosure: Microsoft, the owner of Hotmail, is a sponsor of ReadWriteEnterprise.center_img Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…last_img read more

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