Patrick Stewart & Ian McKellen to Lead No Man’s Land in London

first_imgIan McKellen and Patrick Stewart (Photo by Bruce Glikas) View Comments The rumors were true and the X-Men are joining forces once more in the West End! Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen will headline Harold Pinter’s No Man’s Land in London, reprising their performances from the 2013 Broadway production that played in repertory with Waiting for Godot (which they had starred in, in the West End, in 2009). Sean Mathias will return to direct the production, which after a U.K. tour is set to play a limited engagement September 8 through December 17. Opening night is scheduled for September 20 at the Wyndham’s Theatre.No Man’s Land tells the story of two writers, Hirst (Stewart) and Spooner (McKellen)—but do they really know each other, or are they performing an elaborate charade? The ambiguity intensifies when two other men arrive. Further casting will be announced later.Stewart, who began his career with the Royal Shakespeare Company, earned a Tony nomination for Macbeth. His additional Broadway credits include A Life in the Theatre, The Caretaker, The Ride Down Mt. Morgan, The Tempest, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and his solo adaptation of A Christmas Carol. Best known as Captain Jean Luc Picard in Star Trek, his additional film and TV credits include American Dad, Family Guy, the 2009 TV movie adaptation of Hamlet and, of course, the X-Men movies alongside McKellen.McKellen earned a Tony Award for Amadeus and an additional nomination for Ian McKellen: Acting Shakespeare. His other Broadway credits include Dance of Death, Wild Honey, Amadeus, Ian McKellen: A Night Out at the Lyceum, and The Promise (which he also appeared in in the West End.) Known as Gandalf in the Lord of the Rings films, McKellen’s additional film and TV credits include Stardust, The Prisoner, Coronation Street and Gods and Monsters. He has frequently performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Royal National Theatre.The production will feature set and costume design by Stephen Brimson Lewis and lighting design by Peter Kaczorowski.Check out Broadway.com getting up close and personal with the pair below.last_img read more

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Tickets Now On Sale for Kingdom Come Off-Broadway

first_imgStephanie Styles Tickets are now available for the world premiere of Kingdom Come off-Broadway. Directed by Kip Fagan, penned by Jenny Rachel Weiner and starring Stephanie Styles and more, the production will play a limited engagement October 7 through December 18. Opening night is set for November 2 at Roundabout Underground’s Black Box Theatre in the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre.Along with Styles as Suz, the cast will feature Brooke Bloom as Layne, Carmen M. Herlihy as Samantha Carlin, Alex Hernandez as Dominick Aquendo and Socorro Santiago as Delores Aquendo.Samantha is lonely and confined to her bed. Layne is shy and too afraid of the world to journey into it. When both women decide that online dating might be the outlet they need, they venture into the wilds of the Internet and find deep connection in each other. The only problem: they’re each pretending to be someone else. What happens when the feelings are real but the people are not? Kingdom Come View Commentscenter_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 18, 2016last_img read more

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Just in case

first_imgThe U.S. food and water supply could become targets of terrorism,and scientists in Georgia are preparing for such attacks. Center formedShortly after the events of 9/11, University of Georgiaresearchers teamed up with state officials to form anagroterrorism task force. The Georgia Emergency ManagementAssociation, Georgia Agribusiness Council and Georgia Departmentof Agriculture are partners. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of Georgia Later, a joint venture between Georgia Tech Research Instituteand University of Georgia led to establishing CSAGE, the Centerfor Security of Agriculture and the Environment. “The focus of CSAGE research is to counteract the intentional useof pathogens and chemicals to create terror,” said Jeff Fisher,co-director of CSAGE.”Areas which could be targeted include areas where animals andfood are produced and distributed, fields, water supplies and theatmosphere,” said Fisher, a professor of environmental health atthe UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Not just farmers’ problemThe threat of agroterrorism isn’t a problem just for farmers. “If a disease was introduced into our animal populations, plantcrops or food supply, the value of agriculture would plummet,”Fisher said. “Our trading partners would refuse to buy from us,and the U.S. would head into a deep recession.” Introducing foreign animal diseases like foot-and-mouth diseasecould decimate the nation’s livestock industry. And farmerswouldn’t suffer alone, Fisher said. Every American would feel thepinch.”We could lose up to $100 billion from our national economy fromfoot-and-mouth alone,” he said. “Avian influenza or Newcastledisease, two devastating poultry diseases, would cripple thenation’s poultry industry.”This would be a huge blow to Georgia, which many consider thepoultry capital of the nation.Georgia farmers constantly fight diseases and pests that pop upaccidentally. Intentional introductions could have “a significantand long-lasting impact on agriculture in Georgia,” he said.Researchers at Georgia Tech are working to develop sensors thatcan detect and characterize contaminants in the food chain. “Thissensor technology could be used for field detection, warning forfood processing and laboratory analysis,” Fisher said.Models will assess risksUGA scientists are working on mathematical models to help assessthe risks that attacks could pose to crops, animals and humans.The success of these projects lies in awareness and education.”The extension service at UGA will be used to disseminateagroterror information and educate agriculture personnel acrossthe state,” Fisher said. “Overall, the CSAGE plans to cover thegamut of activities involved in countering agriculturalterrorism.” The group would like to present a mock agroterroristic scenariofor FBI agents, GEMA officials and others to prepare for actualemergencies. But the group needs funding.Fisher has applied for and hopes to get funding for the center through the president’s homeland security program, he said.last_img read more

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Lasting trees

first_imgBy Mike IsbellUniversity of GeorgiaI guess everyone has a favorite Christmas memory. The hikethrough the woods to get a tree was mine.We lived on a farm in north Georgia in Jackson County. Ournearest neighbors were about a half-mile away on an adjoiningfarm. I could look in any direction and see nothing but fieldsand trees. And if I got in just the right spot I could look northand see the mountains.It was a perfect place to grow up.My dad had planted about an acre of eastern red cedars on a hillon the north side of our farm. Each Christmas, my mom and dad, mytwo sisters and I and whatever old dogs we had at the time madethe long hike through the woods and across a couple of creeks towhere the red cedars grew.Thrill of the huntJust getting there was fun. Our old dogs, always sniffing theground and chasing something, scouted our route in front of us.If they ever started barking, I just had to go see what they’dfound. Most of the time, what they found was of interest just tothem.Eventually we’d arrive at the hillside, which overlooked a small,rocky stream lined with native rhododendrons and mountain laurel,and we all split up to find the perfect tree. There was hardlyever a perfect tree. But it really didn’t matter. Just gettingthere was what was fun.Once we could all agree on the tree to cut, Dad would take asmall hatchet, which I still have, and cut down the tree.Now, getting to the hillside where the trees were planted wasfun. But getting the tree back through the woods and across thecreeks was not fun.Drudging trudgingI always got stuck carrying the cut end of the tree, which wasterribly sticky with sap. Needles, little pieces of bark, dirtand all kinds of things stuck to my hands. It was also the heavyend.And I could no longer run and see what the dogs were after.Once we got home, Dad would saw the bottom of the tree offstraight and stand the tree in a bucket of water outside until webrought it into the house.Our tree stand was the bucket. And it was always my job to keepthe cut end of the tree in water in the bucket. It was many yearsbefore we had a real, honest-to-goodness tree stand.The fresh-tree trickDad knew back then — and it’s still important today — to keepthe Christmas tree as fresh as possible. The way to do that is toalways make a fresh cut on the bottom of the tree trunk justbefore you place it in the tree stand and then never let it runout of water.If the tree stand runs out of water, the trunk bottom will beginto seal. Then the tree will take up less water or stop taking upwater at all.If the tree isn’t taking up water, it will dry out. And a drytree is a fire hazard. If something ignites it, it can be a hugetorch within seconds.A well-cared-for Christmas tree should last the entire holidayseason. And with it should come lasting memories of loved onesand family.(Mike Isbell is the Heard County Extension Coordinator withthe University of Georgia College of Agricultural andEnvironmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Georgia bioenergy

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaGrowers, entrepreneurs, investors, educators, economic developers and researchers can all learn about alternative fuel development in Georgia at the Georgia Bioenergy Conference August 1–3 in Tifton, Ga.Information regarding the current state of bioenergy as well as developments on the horizon, how growers in Georgia are key to the success of bioenergy companies and the nuts and bolts of starting or investing in a bioenergy company are all part of the conference. Federal and state legislators also will hold a roundtable discussion.Primary sponsors of the event are the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, the Agriculture Innovation Center in Tifton and Georgia Institute of Technology. For more information, call 229/386-7274. Or visit the Website www.gabioenergy.org.last_img read more

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Armyworms destroy Georgia turf

first_imgAlmost every year in late summer, caterpillars invade turfgrass across Georgia. Damage to established turf is mostly aesthetic, but newly planted sod or sprigged areas can be severely damaged or even killed. Several caterpillars can damage turfgrass, but in late summer most of the problems are caused by fall armyworms. Their favorite turf to feed upon is bermudagrass. Eggs hatch in just daysAdult armyworm moths are active at night. Females lay eggs in masses of 50 to several hundred. Eggs hatch in a few days, and the young larvae begin to feed on leaf tissue. As the worms grow, they consume entire leaves of grass. Armyworms are most active early and late in the day, spending the hotter hours down near the soil in the shade. Larvae feed for 2 to 3 weeks before pupating in the soil. Moths emerge 10 to 14 days later. The entire life cycle — from egg to adult moth — takes about 28 days in the warm weather of August and September. Weather conditions fuel the development of armyworms, said University of Georgia Assistant State Climatologist Pam Knox. Some UGA Cooperative Extension agents report this seaso as the worst they have seen in 25 years, she said. “They devastate pastures and hayfields in locations across the state,” Knox said.Do the soap testTo see if worms are present, perform this simple test: Pour soapy water on the grass (one-half ounce of dishwashing soap per gallon of water). If the worms are present, they will quickly surface. Controlling armyworms and other turf caterpillars is relatively simple once the problem is identified. The old standby carbaryl (Sevin) still works well, as do all the pyrethroids (pyrethroids are those active ingredients listed on a label that end in “-thrin”). If the worms are detected while they are still small, Dipel or other Bacillus thurengiensis-based products provide good control. Treat at nightSince armyworms are most active late in the day and at night, applications should be made as late in the evening as possible. It is not necessary to water after application, but an application rate of 20 to 25 gallons of solution per acre as a minimum will ensure good coverage. Do not cut the grass for 1 to 3 days after application.For more information on maintaining turfgrasses in Georgia, visit www.Georgiaturf.com.last_img read more

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Rain soaking cotton fields

first_imgThe deluge of rainfall this summer made a splash with some cotton farmers but created a tidal wave of challenges that some growers are still fighting.While the increased moisture sparked growth in some cotton plants, it stunted growth in other fields and made fields almost impossible for tractors and equipment to pass through.“There a lot of folks that are struggling to get in the field to get any work done. There’s some cotton that hasn’t been side dressed yet. We’re a little bit behind on that,” said Guy Collins, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist. “In places, there’s cotton that’s drowning. There’s a lot of water-logged cotton, not really taking off like we had hoped.”Unlike recent years when the cotton crop endured long periods of drought, it’s been common this year for fields around the state to get several days of rain. According to the UGA’s Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, the Bowen Farm on the UGA Tifton campus recorded 15.17 inches May 1-July 21. In comparison, the rainfall accumulated registered just 8.16 inches in 2012 and only 4.70 inches in 2011. During that same timeframe on the UGA campus in Griffin, 18.94 inches were recorded in 2013, 9.42 in 2012 and only 7.66 in 2011. “Right now, I’ve got cotton in the fourth week in bloom, and there’s some out there that’s very young,” Collins said. “You’ve kind of got a broad spectrum of crops and it ranges in terms of when they were planted.”Collins added that during this time of year cotton farmers, who plant early, are normally either irrigating, which hasn’t been necessary, or applying plant growth regulator treatments along with insect management. “That’s a challenge we’re running into. Farmers can’t (apply treatments) when they normally would so they’re a little bit behind schedule,” Collins said. For growers, the challenge may also be attributed to their particular field. For those who farm on low-lying fields, the problem is the ground doesn’t drain well. Water is left standing in the fields, which drowns the cotton. Farmers with fields that slope have to deal with washes, making it difficult for equipment to travel.More and more farmers have also resorted to hiring airplane pilots to apply chemicals or fertilizer on their cotton. It’s an added expense but one that’s probably “necessary,” for some growers, Collins said.Though farmers have encountered obstacles with the soggy conditions, Collins insists circumstances could be worse. “If we were in a drought, it would be a lot worse than what we have now,” he said. “However, a short-lived, slightly drier spell wouldn’t hurt us right now, but we don’t need rains to subside completely.”For more information about the UGA’s research on cotton, see www.ugacotton.com/.last_img read more

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Voice-Activated Tractors

first_imgVoice-activated tractors are the future of farming, according to University of Georgia agricultural engineer Glen Rains. Through research on the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences campus in Tifton, Georgia, and in partnership with Georgia Tech, Rains is researching voice-activated software that will cause tractors to stop in the event of an emergency. “Say a farmer had a heart attack or fell off of a tractor. With the voice activation, they could stop the tractor by using just their voice,” said Rains. He envisions the tractor stopping in the event of an emergency, notifying 911 and providing the farmer’s location, and alerting the farmer’s family. The innovation consists of a series of microphones that are mounted onto the tractor. Noise cancellation devices allow the farmer’s voice to be heard over the sounds of the tractor or other piece of farming equipment. The farmer must be within 10 meters – about 32 feet – of the microphone for it to detect his voice. “We just need to delve into more of the broader aspects – multiple types of tractors and voice types,” Rains said. “We need to test multiple algorithms for noise cancellation and voice recognition outside the tractor.” This is challenging because the microphone is trying to pick up the volume of a person’s voice over other noises, he said. Since all voices are different, the system must be trained to recognize each distinct voice. Rains is focusing on the mechanical parts of the device that control switching the tractor off and calling 911. His colleague, David Anderson, professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech, is working on the voice activation and noise cancellation aspects of the project. Rains is also receiving assistance from the AGCO Corporation, an agricultural equipment manufacturer headquartered in Duluth, Georgia. “When we build our first system, it will be put onto [an AGCO] tractor,” said Rains. Rains has been working on this project for almost three years and hopes it will be ready for commercial use in another three years. His inspiration for the device came from many years of training EMTs and firefighters how to extract people caught in farming equipment. After speaking to many spouses, friends and children of farmers who have been injured, Rains sees a great need for the device. “One of the scenarios I have heard repeatedly involves someone being grabbed by a piece of equipment and being isolated for a while before anyone knows they are caught in the equipment,” Rains said. “My objective is to develop something to keep that from happening.” Rains is also working with AGCO Corporation on a project that uses a tractor-mounted camera to take 3-D photos, complete with GPS location, in peanut fields in order to detect where diseases initially occur.Rains’ other farm equipment modifications include the UGA “Row-bot,” a computer-guided vehicle that checks the health of plants and fields, monitors cattle and sprays for insects. As co-director of the National AgrAbility Project in Georgia, he also modifies farm equipment for farmers with disabilities.(Kenzie Kesselring is an intern on the UGA Tifton Campus).last_img read more

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Clean First

first_imgSummer comes with its own set of toys and tools to maximize fun and adventure. Beach days, camping trips and even time on the patio require towels, sleeping bags, cushions and more. Now that fall has arrived, it’s a good time for a thorough cleaning to make sure these items will last through the winter and be ready to use next spring.Follow these tips from the American Cleaning Institute and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to get all your favorite things ready for storage. Nobody wants to be surprised by musty linens and smelly toys when it’s time for summer fun next year!Sleeping bags: If you spent any time on the beach, your sleeping bag may have quite a bit of sand on, and in, it. Start by turning the bag inside out and drying out any dampness. Then shake the bag and vacuum any remaining residue from the surface. Once it’s sand-free, wash it according to the care label on the bag, as there are many different materials used to make sleeping bags.Musty beach towels: Nothing is worse than a smelly, musty towel. To counteract this, wash towels in the hottest water setting that’s safe for the fabric. Most of the time, fabric softener is not recommended for towels as it can coat the fibers and reduce their absorbing power. However, for beach towels, it’s OK to add a small amount of fabric softener to the final rinse. Machine dry them thoroughly. Avoid overloading the washer or dryer to ensure thorough cleaning and drying.Flannel-backed plastic tablecloths: After each use, the plastic side of tablecloths should be wiped with a soapy sponge to clean the surface well. To wash the whole tablecloth, place it in the washing machine and use the gentle cycle. Dry on the delicate cycle for 15 minutes; any longer and the vinyl could be damaged. Hang the tablecloth to finish drying.Patio furniture: In humid areas, it’s common for resin furniture to get some mold and mildew over the summer season. Resin and plastic furniture can be cleaned with mild detergent and water. Bleach and abrasive powders are not necessary or recommended. For outdoor cushions, use liquid dish soap and lukewarm water to spot clean acrylic, polyester and cotton fabrics. Rinse the furniture with water and air dry.Muddy sneakers: Hiking, biking and many other outdoor activities leave sneakers very dirty. Let mud dry completely, then take the shoes outside and clap the soles together to remove any big chunks of dry mud. Then, clean sneakers with a toothbrush and a mixture of warm water and dishwashing liquid. If there are stubborn stains, use a nylon pad. Wipe the sneakers with a wet paper towel or damp sponge, then let them air dry. Stuff paper towels inside the shoes to absorb excess moisture.Plastic pool toys: These toys get a lot of love over the summer! Wash them with warm water and soap, then let them soak for five minutes in a solution of bleach and water — ¾ cup bleach in 1 gallon of water. Let the toys dry thoroughly before storing them in a closed container to keep dirt and dust away over the winter months.For more information on cleaning, visit www.cleaninginstitute.org or www.gafamilies.org/home.last_img read more

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Bauske ASHS Award

first_imgEllen Bauske is a boundary spanner — she’s known as a person who brings people and organizations together on national, regional and local levels.It’s one of the many reasons she received the American Society of Horticultural Science’s 2020 Extension Educator of the Year Award, which recognizes an educator who has made an outstanding contribution to extension education in horticulture for more than 10 years.Bauske serves as a program coordinator for the University of Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. She has helped develop innovative programming in a variety of disciplines, including integrated pest management, water, consumer horticulture, Master Gardener Extension Volunteer training, community gardens, landscape and tree care worker safety.”Ellen Bauske is a doer,” said Dan Suiter, who is chair of the center’s faculty advisory committee. “Her formal training is in plant pathology, but she has been very adaptable in the many years she’s been with the Center for Urban Agriculture. She, like no one I’ve known, can get people to move as a group in the direction of accomplishment. It’s a rare skill.”Harald Scherm, head of the Department of Plant Pathology, agrees. “Ellen has consistently reinvented herself and her Extension programming during the past 15 years,” he said. “She has been remarkably responsive to emerging needs and opportunities.”Bauske currently serves as chair of the National Initiative for Consumer Horticulture, an organization she’s worked with to strengthen academic and industry collaboration since 2012. Along with fellow academics, she gathers industry stakeholders and national leaders from nongovernmental organizations to help increase recognition of the human health, economic and environmental benefits of consumer horticulture.“For the first time in consumer horticulture, we’re making an effort to lock arms with our industry partners, and that’s a game changer,” Bauske explained. “We’ve always paid attention to home gardeners, but now we have also reached out to our industry stakeholders,  retailers and the services that meet the needs of gardeners. That includes landscapers, arborists, garden centers, garden writers and the many nonprofits involved in residential food production. We are forging those relationships now to build common ground. We’ve been putting out proposals for grants and they’re getting better and better.”Gail Langellotto, professor of urban and community horticulture Extension at Oregon State University, says the organization has been a successful endeavor under Bauske’s leadership.“It is not hyperbole to say that she has helped to elevate the field of consumer horticulture so that those of us who work in the field are better networked, more competitive for federal funding, and better able to communicate the value of our work to stakeholders and decision makers,” she said.Based at the UGA Griffin campus for more than 15 years, Bauske stays connected to UGA Cooperative Extension specialists and agents around the state. One of her most well-known focus areas is chainsaw education programming, and she developed the UGA Saw Safety Team to have agents deliver trainings and timely information to industry professionals and homeowners.Tree care is the most dangerous job in the U.S. The Southeast is prone to many natural disasters that cause extensive tree damage. Storm damage is dangerous for professionals, and it often prompts homeowners who don’t regularly use chainsaws to pull them out and start cutting.“With the hurricanes blowing through, OSHA (the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration) asked if we could do an emergency safety training about chainsaws. When storms like that go through, everybody grabs a chainsaw — and I mean everybody. They’ll think, ‘it’s already on the ground, how dangerous can it be?’ It’s incredibly dangerous,” Bauske said.Outreach for the program included videos like, “Common tree felling accidents and what you can do to prevent them,” which has been viewed nearly 680,000 times. Ultimately, a total of 1,220 people received 2,215 hours of in-person safety training.She has also authored or coauthored numerous guides and UGA Extension publications, including “Chainsaw Safety: Always Use Your Personal Protective Equipment (PPE),” “Choosing a Landscape Irrigation Contractor” and “Hiring a Tree Care Service.”Whether it’s organizing a survey for the Georgia Arborists Association, promoting native pollinator programs or creating training materials for OSHA, Bauske always has a team-oriented approach.“I’ve never had a project with less than five people on it,” she said. “I’ve done a lot of work with the states around us.  We can do more together than we could ever do alone.”Locally, Bauske has helped support the Healthy Life Community Gardens in the Fairmount community, a historically Black neighborhood in Griffin. The garden serves as a focal point for extension educational programming and provides a safe location for activities.After the development of the garden, an interest in the history of the neighborhood fostered the Fairmont Oral History Project, a collaboration with the UGA Special Collection Libraries to document the desegregation of the city.“I had once read that community gardens are often the site of political organization — they’re not kidding,” she recalled. “It’s amazing what fruits grow there.”For more information about ASHS, visit ashs.org. To learn more about the Center for Urban Agriculture, see ugaurbanag.com.last_img read more

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