Rent falls put squeeze on London landlords

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Continue reading

Bank balance

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Continue reading

Prizes for your writers awards

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Continue reading

PREMIUMJakarta’s ‘flood control’ under fire as thousands displaced

first_imgFacebook #flooding flood-control flood flood-mitigation #AniesBaswedan anies-baswedan Greater-Jakarta #Jakarta Linkedin The frequent heavy inundation caused by extreme rainfall and river floods across Jakarta since New Year’s Eve has raised questions about the city’s flood management capacity.Floodwaters in several areas of the capital Jakarta had just begun to recede on Monday morning, but heavy rains again battered the city overnight to cause mild to severe flooding on Tuesday morning that paralyzed traffic on several major streets.According to PetaBencana.id, which provides real-time flood information, 87 areas across the city had reported floods by 8:53 a.m. on Feb. 25.With Tuesday’s flooding, several Commuter train lines and Transjakarta bus routes serving Greater Jakarta have been disrupted for two consecutive days. Several major train stations were closed on Tuesday due to the flooding, including Ga… Topics : LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ? Log in with your social account Googlelast_img read more

Continue reading

PREMIUMNorwegian company to build $70m solar plant in touristy Labuhan Bajo

first_imgOslo-based multinational Scatec Solar plans to build a 70 megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) plant in Labuan Bajo, a famous tourist destination in East Nusa Tenggara (NTT).The $70 million plants are five times bigger than Indonesia’s current largest solar PV plant, the 15MW Likupang solar farm in North Sulawesi. A developer plans to begin developing the 100 hectare Labuan Bajo farm later this year and starts its operation by 2022, a year before the province is slated to host a G20 summit.”In Asia, our biggest operating country is Malaysia. Next in development is Vietnam and Indonesia,” Scatec’s Southeast Asia representative Jeevaneswaran “Jeevan” Ramoo told The Jakarta Post on Monday (9/3).Scatec is among several renewable companies investing in the renewable energy industry of Southeast Asia’s largest economy that attracted $1.5 billi… Indonesia energy solar-power-plant Scatec labuan-bajo East-Nusa-Tenggara PLN tourists Topics : Linkedin Facebook Google Forgot Password ? Log in with your social account LOG INDon’t have an account? Register herelast_img read more

Continue reading

$3.9 billion state spending reallocated for COVID-19 response: Sri Mulyani

first_imgSri Mulyani asked ministries to delay big-check spending to allow more room for fiscal intervention in light of uncertainties surrounding the pandemic this year. The Finance Ministry will move quickly to facilitate other ministries’ spending priorities, she added.“This will provide us with fiscal space for health care and protect the public and businesspeople.”Indonesia had 369 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 32 deaths as of Friday. Globally, the pneumonia-like illness has infected over 240,000 people and claimed at least 10,000 lives.The government has previously announced two rounds of stimulus packages including a package worth Rp 22.9 trillion, which includes individual and corporate tax breaks. The first package, worth Rp 10.3 trillion announced on Feb. 25, provides staple needs and mortgage subsidies for low-income families and fiscal incentives for travel-related businesses.Highlights of state spending reallocation announced Friday:Incentives worth Rp 3.9 trillion for tourism as a part of the first stimulus package will be adjusted by the government to respond to the fast-changing pandemic conditions.The government will increase the number of those receiving the Family Hope program (PKH) from 10 million families to 15 million families with the same benefits, aiming to provide a social safety net for up to 70 million individuals.A total of Rp 10 trillion funds for the newly launched pre-employment card program.Health care will receive additional Rp 6.1 trillion for insurance and compensation for medical workers including doctors and nurses.The government has pledged to evaluate Rp 3.3 trillion requested by National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) to step up fight against the pandemic.The government will redesign the disbursement of Rp 72 trillion in village funds this year. The government will reallocate Rp 62.3 trillion (US$3.9 billion) of state spending from the 2020 budget to tackle COVID-19, focusing on health care, the disbursement of social funds and financial incentives for enterprises.The sum was a significant increase from previous estimates of Rp 27 trillion budget reallocation on top of the Rp 120 trillion allocation for stimulus packages as the government mulls over worst-case scenarios including the possibility of zero percent economic growth, ministers said.“We identified around Rp 62.3 trillion of planned spending that can be re-allocated to priority areas put forward by the President. This includes funding for business trips, blocked funds and non-operational purchase of goods, among other items,” Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati told a teleconferenced media briefing on Friday. “We will adjust the budget to the three priority areas, including the procurement of medical devices and hospital needs such as the preparation of Wisma Atlet [athletes’ village in Jakarta] and hospital construction in Galangan Island for COVID-19.”Read also: Jokowi urges ministers to focus budget on health care, social aid, economic stimuliSri Mulyani referred to President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s directive for state spending to prioritize health care, disbursement of social funds and financial incentives for enterprises to cushion the negative economic impact of the novel coronavirus.The government’s baseline scenario was for Indonesia’s gross domestic product (GDP) to grow above 4 percent this year, Sri Mulyani said. Meanwhile, under the assumption that the pandemic lasts for six months, global trade slumps by 30 percent and the country goes into lockdown, economic growth could fall to as low as zero to 2.5 percent, she added.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Continue reading

Nearly 400 Indonesians infected with COVID-19 abroad, with 16 deaths

first_imgTopics : The number of Indonesians infected by the novel coronavirus overseas increased to 391 on Thursday, after the Foreign Ministry recorded 79 new confirmed cases emerging over the past seven days.On its official Twitter account @Kemlu_RI, the ministry said the Indonesian citizens were infected across 28 foreign territories as well as aboard international cruise liners.According to ministry data, cruise liners had the highest number of infected Indonesians, with 101 cases, of which nine have recovered and 91 were currently in stable condition. The United States, which currently has the most coronavirus infections of any country around the globe, has recorded 27 Indonesians testing positive for COVID-19 among more than 630,000 cases on its soil.One Indonesian citizen has tested positive in Canada.Ten European countries have also reported Indonesian citizens among their confirmed coronavirus cases.The Netherlands has recorded six Indonesians with COVID-19, while Turkey and Belgium have two cases each.Meanwhile, six Indonesians tested positive in the United Kingdom, three in Italy and seven in Germany.Spain — now the hardest hit by the coronavirus in Europe — has reported 11 Indonesians among more than 182,000 cases recorded as of Thursday, while the Vatican has recorded seven cases involving Indonesians.Ireland and Finland recorded one case each.According to the Foreign Ministry’s data, 16 Indonesians overseas have died from COVID-19, with five reported in the US, three in the Netherlands and two in Singapore and Malaysia. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia, the UK, Turkey and one cruise ship each reported that one Indonesian had died from the disease.Of the 319 confirmed cases abroad, 71 Indonesians have recovered.As of Thursday, confirmed coronavirus cases have surpassed 2 million worldwide – in 210 countries and territories – with at least 136,036 fatalities, according to Worldometer data. center_img In Southeast Asia, neighboring Singapore and Malaysia hosted the highest number of infected Indonesians with 47 and 44 cases, respectively. Meanwhile, four positive coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Brunei Darussalam, two in Cambodia, one in the Philippines and one in Thailand.Seventy-one Indonesians have tested positive for COVID-19 in India, which is now imposing the largest lockdown in history. Thirteen have recovered and 62 are in stable condition. Pakistan has recorded 16 cases of COVID-19 involving Indonesians.South Korea and Macau have recorded one and three cases, respectively, while Taiwan has three cases.In the Middle East, nine Indonesians have tested positive in Saudi Arabia, one in Oman, three in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and four in Qatar.last_img read more

Continue reading

East Java’s sequencing reveals similarities to Chinese, European coronavirus strains

first_imgAirlangga University’s Institute of Tropical Diseases (ITD-UNAIR) in Surabaya has completed six whole genome sequencing analysis on genetic data of SARS-CoV-2, of which four were found to be similar to the Chinese strain and two similar to the European strain.ITD-UNAIR director Maria Ingelusida said data of two whole virus genome sequences had been sent to Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID), while the four others were in the finishing phase at the lab.”Four isolated sequences of the virus we’ve analyzed are closer to the Chinese clade and two are closer to the European clade,” Maria told The Jakarta Post on Wednesday. She said that so far, there were three clades of SARS-CoV-2, namely type A (found in bats), type B of the Chinese strain, and type C of the European strain.The complete six isolated SARS-CoV-2 sequences were among 20 samples taken from COVID-19 patients in Surabaya and several other cities in East Java, she said.Read also: From test kits to robots, Indonesia develops locally made devices to aid COVID-19 battleMaria said SARS-CoV-2 whole genome sequence data provided virologists and molecular biologists with valuable information on important changes to antigen as well as valuable information for vaccine development.”This data is very important because genes will code proteins that are produced by the virus. Information on the protein is needed in vaccine development, for instance,” she said.She said ITD-UNAIR would continue its whole genome sequencing project with more samples to be analyzed.Topics : She said the six whole virus genome sequences might reveal the origin of SARS-CoV-2 in East Java. Data of three whole genome sequences submitted earlier by the Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology to GISAID were all similar to the Chinese clade, she added.Read also: Coronavirus strain in Indonesia different from those of other countries, govt says”So, ours provides new findings in terms of the virus origin, that the virus transmission source here is also from Europe, not only China,” she said, adding that the whole genome sequence data could also tell the virus transmission path.Maria said SARS-CoV-2 was an ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus that easily mutated. Therefore, she said, the SARS-CoV-2 whole genome sequences from Indonesia would certainly have some genetic peculiarities although they were closer to either the Chinese branch or the European branch.  last_img read more

Continue reading

PT KAI to reopen intercity routes under strict ‘new normal’ protocols

first_imgHe added that train travel would adhere to the health protocols stipulated in a circular issued by the Transportation Ministry’s Railway Directorate General that outlines guidelines for railway transportation during the so-called “new normal” period.From limitations on passenger numbers to document requirements for passengers, these are the health protocols that must be followed during intercity and local train travel: State-owned train operator PT Kereta Api Indonesia (KAI) will restart operations of 14 long-distance and 23 local passenger train services on Friday after shutting down such services for two months to help prevent COVID-19 transmission.The operator stopped all passenger train services in April following the government’s ban on the Idul Fitri mudik (exodus). However, the train operator permitted travel in May for individuals exempt from the government’s restriction.“We are resuming the regular routes as a part of our commitment to serve people who want to travel between cities using trains,” KAI director Didiek Hartantyo said on Wednesday in a statement. KAI financial director Maqin Norhadi said passengers who do not comply with the protocols will not be permitted to travel and will be given a full refund.center_img The 14 long-distance train routes set to reopen Friday include KA Sancaka (Yogyakarta to Surabaya, East Java), KA Ranggajati (Cirebon, West Java, to Jember, East Java) and KA Kahuripan (Bandung, West Java, to Blitar, East Java). Meanwhile, the 23 local trains include KA Kaligung connecting Tegal and Semarang in Central Java.Read also: Commuters return to public transport with more protective gearAs of Thursday, the train operator was running 99 local train services in various cities.Maqin said PT KAI was operating 113 train services, 21 percent of its regular 532 regular train services.“We will gradually reopen routes in accordance with the PSBB [large-scale social restrictions] measures in each region, and continue to evaluate the progress of operation of regular trains,” he said.Travelers can reserve tickets online seven days prior to departure through the KAI Access application, while offline tickets will only be available for purchase three hours before the train’s departure.Topics :last_img read more

Continue reading

Jakarta’s air pollution returns as activity resumes

first_imgAir quality in the capital has not improved significantly, largely because the “new normal” habits that the government is promoting put an emphasis on preventing the spread of COVID-19 rather than controlling emissions, said Greenpeace Indonesia campaigner Bondan Andriyanu.He urged the government to take corrective measures such as improving national air quality standards to be on par with WHO provisions and coordinating with neighboring provinces to control pollution spillover.“The government must soon conduct routine emission checks and make inventories so it can figure out the source of emissions, monitor their movement through geographical space and add more sensors to present a more accurate picture of air quality in Jakarta,” Bondan said.The government has said that air quality has improved compared to the same period last year.According to Environment and Forestry Ministry data taken from a weather station at Gelora Bung Karno in Central Jakarta, the period between Jan. 1 to June 8 saw a slight increase in air quality compared to the same period in 2019.The yearly average particulate level for 2020 as of June 8 was 24.33 μg/m3, lower than the 2019 average of 28.57 μg/m3.According to Government Regulation No. 41/1999, the threshold standard for yearly national particulate levels is 15 μg/m3 for PM 2.5, compared to the WHO’s average of 10 ug/m3.The Jakarta Environment Agency also recorded that the sixth, seventh and eighth weeks of PSBB showed improved air quality compared to the same period last year.Jakarta’s air quality between May 18 and 24 was 31.02 μg/m3, 27.88 percent lower than the previous year’s level, while in the seventh week of PSBB it was 29.76 μg/m3, down 31.02 percent year-on-year (yoy). In the eighth week it was 32.31 μg/m3, down 24.88 percent yoy, according to data from the Bundaran Hotel Indonesia weather station.“This is proof that when activities, including in the economy, were on hold, the overall environmental quality improved, including the air,” said Jakarta Environment Agency head Andono Warih said at an online discussion earlier this month.Reduced pollution levels were the result of the work-from-home policy and lower-than-normal traffic during Idul Fitri, he said. Limited public transportation also discouraged people from leaving their homes.However, Ahmad Safrudin of the Committee for the Phasing Out of Leaded Fuel (KPBB) said the return of traffic congestion and its associated air pollution must be anticipated.“Whether we want it or not, we have to be strict in anticipating people who use private vehicles because of [limited options for] public transport,” he said.With one of the worst air pollution problems in the world, Greater Jakarta is lacking in tough policies to reduce emissions from the transportation sector, which contributes between 70 and 80 percent of all emissions, surveys show.Worldwide, air pollution causes around seven million premature deaths every year, according to the United Nations.The most deadly forms of pollution come from burning fossil fuels, which is also the main driver of global warming.Topics : The respite of bluer skies and slightly fresher air that Jakartans enjoyed during the city’s large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) has given way to smog as activities resume in the capital. But air quality during PSBB, while it was generally better than other periods, was still not ideal.Data compiled by Greenpeace Indonesia from ambient air sensors at the United States embassy buildings in Central and South Jakarta show that the capital did not have a single day of “good” air quality from the beginning of PSBB to June 4, when it began gradually easing restrictions.“Good” air quality occurs when the air quality at a given location does not exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) standard of 25 micrograms per cubic meter (μg/m3) for particulate matter 2.5, measured on a six-grade air quality scale. Not a single day of healthy air was logged in the period between March 14 and April 9. Air quality was rated “moderate” for 19 days in Central Jakarta and five days in South Jakarta; “unhealthy for sensitive groups” for eight days in Central Jakarta and 17 days in South Jakarta; and “unhealthy” for five days in South Jakarta.The period between April 10 and June 4 was also without healthy days. Central Jakarta reported moderate air quality for a total of 30 days and “unhealthy for sensitive groups” for 26 days. The South Jakarta sensor recorded three moderate days, 37 days that were unhealthy for sensitive groups and 14 days of unhealthy air quality.After June 4, Jakarta rejoined the ranks of the world’s most polluted cities, according to the World Air Quality Project’s Air Quality Index (AQI). The AQI collects data from national meteorology departments, including Indonesia’s Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG).From June 5 to 16, Central Jakarta’s air quality was “unhealthy for sensitive groups” for 10 days and “unhealthy” for two days, while South Jakarta logged four and eight days in each category, respectively.last_img read more

Continue reading