Atlanta’s bishop joins sanitation crew to mark Dr. King’s birthday

first_img January 18, 2014 at 8:40 pm Bishop Rob,A powerful witness about Dr Kings commitment for justice for those whom many saw/see as the least. Thank you acting in genuine servant language, exchanging liturgical vestment for workman’s vest. In this you are a priest revealing Christ on an altar and elements deemed common and lowly. +Nathan Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET February 3, 2014 at 9:08 pm Bishop Wright,This is an awesome testimony of love for humanity and a demonstration of the love Christ showed to all. Thank you for allowing God to use you in such a special way. It is people like you who bring others to Christ.Joan Cranford Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Melida Fitten (Mellie) says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET martha knight says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL January 22, 2014 at 1:54 am Your Grace never stops to inspire. May my Diocese of East Carolina be so blest this year when God sends us a new bishop. January 18, 2014 at 1:26 pm God bless you as you continue to lead by example On Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Atlanta, Bishop Rob Wright works the morning trash pickup. Photo: Don Plummer/Diocese of Atlanta[Diocese of Atlanta]  Atlanta’s Bishop Rob Wright took a page out of history Wednesday and spent Dr. Martin Luther King’s birthday with city sanitation workers.“Dr. King spent his last hours on earth advocating for garbage workers, and it only seems right that I mark his birthday by spending it with those in similar circumstances,” Bishop Wright said at the 7 a.m. roll call.Bishop Rob Wright leads a prayer for sanitation workers before their shift begins. Photo: Don Plummer/Diocese of AtlantaAfter speaking to and praying with workers, Wright joined a sanitation truck crew for several hours on busy downtown streets. He emptied garbage cans, rode  on the bumper of a truck as it went between stops, and learned how to work the truck’s compactor.Wright is marking his tenure with events on the streets working with the poor and forgotten. Prior to his bishop ordination and consecration in October 2012 he washed and massaged people’s feet at the foot-health clinic operated by the diocese’s ministry to Atlanta’s homeless.Wright’s commitment to engage with people about their everyday needs can be traced back to years he spent as a Howard University student working for the Children’s Defense Fund and the city of Washington, D.C.’s community centers.“Church and religion aren’t just a Sunday thing; Jesus lived and worked every day among people whose lives were hard and who needed the presence of someone who cared about them,” Wright said at the workers’ pre-dawn gathering where three sanitation workers shared their life stories.One of them, E. Nelson Williams, talked about an exhibit he developed and titled “Image Is” on the contributions of black Americans. Williams called on his colleagues to identify their own black heroes as a way of honoring Dr. King.“The continued advancement of humanity is inevitably linked to our predecessors, who by example serve as inspirational reminders to persevere … for a brighter future,” Williams said.Last fall Wright announced a plan increasing community-based ministries and refocusing the diocese’s permanent diaconate on the needs of the poor and other people living on the margins of society.Bishop Rob Wright notes the irony of one discarded item. Photo: Don Plummer/Diocese Atlanta“The work of a deacon on behalf of the church in the world is too important to conflate with other tasks,” he said. “There is a ‘harvest’ in the world, Jesus has said.  The permanent diaconate, for our church, is the eyewitness and herald of this harvest.”Currently the diocese, which consists of 109 worshiping communities in middle and north Georgia, supports ministries providing health care, food, workplace training and assistance to those dealing with abuse and mental illness.— Don Plummer is communications consultant for the Diocese of Atlanta and is a member of St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church, Acworth, Georgia. George Kooney says: January 18, 2014 at 1:37 am Revdmo. Rob Wright: El ejemplo de Su Excelencia me ha conmovido grandemente. Me doy cuenta que yo he hecho poco por mis semejantes, pero que puedo hacer mas siguiendo el ejemplo suyo para conmemorar como se debe la gesta de nuestro Martin Luther King Jr.Gracias Señor Obispo, por predicarme con el ejemplo. Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY January 17, 2014 at 9:34 pm Thank you, Bishop Wright! Thinking of you and your flock from folks just a diocese or two away from you in Middle Tennessee. We will keep you in our thoughts and prayers. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA January 17, 2014 at 6:22 pm Thank you Bishop Wright. This is the essence of ministry. The Very Rev. Walter Brownridge says: Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC January 16, 2014 at 7:05 pm Thank you so much Bishop Rob for your public witness! Mahalo Nui Loa! Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Rev. Fabio Sotelo says: Nathan D. Baxter says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA February 12, 2014 at 10:22 am Thank you Bishop Wright for making your self present amongst the needy, for taking time out. God spends lots of time with all of us. This is what he wants us to do. God Bless you. Rector Tampa, FL Joan Cranford says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Rev. Gary England, Deacon, Diocese of East Tennessee says: David Wayland says: Barbara H. Whitton says: Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (19) Featured Events Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA January 19, 2014 at 6:22 pm This is faith in action where the church meets people right where they are at! Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Gerard Pisani Jr says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls John Newman says: January 17, 2014 at 4:30 pm Bishop Rob,May God richly bless you in your ministry as you are a blessing to the Church.Gary January 21, 2014 at 4:11 pm Wow — very inspiring. Thanks for your example. Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Marie-Louise Muhumuza says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Br. Aelred Bernard Dean, BSG says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anna Grimes says: January 18, 2014 at 4:27 pm Amen and Amen, Bishop Wright ! January 18, 2014 at 10:17 am You make me proud to be a Christian, an Episcopalian, a priest, and a former member of your Diocese. You model the kind of Christian action we see in Pope Francis. Yes, once a Deacon, always a Deacon, as we once taught. The church moves forward on service to others. . Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK JAMES K. MURIUKI says: February 21, 2014 at 9:46 am Actions speak louder than words.They will know us by our deeds. Thank you Bishop Wright! Delois Ward says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA January 18, 2014 at 11:11 am Bishop Wright, thank you for your leadership. No words to add. Blessings Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By Don PlummerPosted Jan 16, 2014 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. Rector Albany, NY Atlanta’s bishop joins sanitation crew to mark Dr. King’s birthday January 18, 2014 at 11:44 am When our bishops continue to lead us in following the Jesus of history then maybe more of our people will know what it means to be a “Follower of The Way” and serve as the one who came “not to be served but to serve”.WIth gratitude,Jerry+ January 22, 2014 at 7:19 pm Bishop Wright,It is so touching to see you expressing Christlike example. Putting yourself in a real life situation where you identify yourself with the humanity we always do not see or look down on them without saying a word. Bishop, we all want to identify with your ministry. Thank you so much for the challenge you are heaping on our shoulders. Francisco Vasquez says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Danny Anderson says: January 17, 2014 at 11:17 pm Bishop Rob: Your example should spur all us disciples to do the Lord’s work wherever it is needed.Your friend George from the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, NYC. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

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Episcopal Church called to a ‘powerful opportunity to exercise our…

first_imgEpiscopal Church called to a ‘powerful opportunity to exercise our shared baptismal ministry’ with Standing Rock Sioux Nation Peaceful witness against Dakota Access Pipeline by Missouri River set for Nov. 3 By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 28, 2016 Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church is amplifying the call of the Episcopal community on the Standing Rock Sioux Nation in North Dakota to stand in solidarity and witness with those protecting the tribe’s land and water supply.Signs from an early action stand stacked in a corner at St. James Episcopal Church in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, near the epicenter of opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe Rev. John Floberg, supervising priest of the Episcopal churches on the North Dakota side of Standing Rock, has appealed for clergy and laity around the Episcopal Church to come together on the banks of the Missouri River in North Dakota to stand in witness and solidarity on Nov. 3. The current construction route of the Dakota Access Pipeline would run under the river, which is the Sioux Nation’s water supply; over its treaty lands and through sacred areas.In a statement issued Oct. 28, the Church said Floberg’s appeal came because he and others in North Dakota are “concerned by the increased repression of non-violent water protectors whose ranks include men, women and youth.” The statement also noted that the appeal is “supported by the wisdom of Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II.”The Nov. 3 action “is being designed to be peaceful, to be prayerful, to be nonviolent and to show the church’s solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s struggle,” Floberg told Episcopal News Service.“We’re doing it purposely to not face off against the police,” he said. “We’re providing a witness to the police, we’re providing a witness to DAPL that we’re standing with these tribal people, but we are not making a stand-off with them.”Since Floberg issued the call on Oct. 23 via email and Facebook, more than 100 clergy have said they would participate, half of them Episcopalians. One hundred clergy was Floberg’s original goal. “That is extremely humbling and I am extremely grateful that the Episcopal Church is answering the call,” he said.The churchwide support of Floberg’s appeal is rooted in the Church’s continuing support of the protection effort since shortly after it began in earnest in August. That includes last week’s request from the Church’s Executive Council that law-enforcement officials “de-escalate military and police provocation in and near the campsites of peaceful protest and witness of the Dakota Access Pipeline project.”The Church’s support of the witness appeal comes the day after some pipeline opponents in a recently formed camp were forcibly removed from a camp. The camp was set up Oct. 22 near Highway 1806 and outside of the existing camps on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers land near the Missouri River.Law-enforcement authorities form a line Oct. 27 as they prepare to evict a new camp of Dakota Access Pipeline opponents from the sides of Highway 1806. Photo: Caroline Grueskin via TwitterThe Morton County Sheriff Department led that action after, it said, its attempt to negotiate with occupants of the new camp failed. Department officers and other law-enforcement officials used, among other things, “a long range acoustic device which sends a high-pitch warning tone” to “control and disperse the crowd of protesters.” Social media reports said the authorities, some of whom were armed with long batons, also used pepper spray and fired small bean bags at protestors.Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier called the new camp “a public safety issues” because people were blocking county roads and state highways, as well as trespassing on private property. The private land was recently sold to the construction company but the land is also claimed by some as land belonging to the Sioux Nation. And, the ability of nonfamily corporations to own or operate North Dakota farm and ranch land is currently in dispute, further clouding the issue.The department said late on Oct. 27 that 141 people were arrested during the action to clear the camp and remove a roadblock on a nearby county road. “Officers met violence and resistance including a protester who fired a gun at officers in the police line, protesters who threw Molotov cocktails at them and set vehicles and debris on fire,” the department said.One supporter of the police action said on the department’s Facebook page that it was good that officials were cleaning out the “vermin.”An Oct. 27 aerial photo from the Morton County Sheriff Department shows a fire reportedly set by Dakota Access Pipeline project opponents on County Road 134. Photo: Morton County Sheriff Department via FacebookAs the police action was unfolding the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe said it was praying for peace and asked that the police “ensure everyone’s safety.”“We also call on the thousands of water protectors who stand in solidarity with us against DAPL to remain in peace and prayer,” the tribe said in the statement. “Any act of violence hurts our cause and is not welcome here.”Floberg echoed that concern, saying that hours before the Morton County sheriff acted he had come across a roadblock on Highway 1806 consisting of a Chevrolet Suburban and a large log. He told U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs officials about it because 1806 is the main north-south highway in the area and a roadblock would prevent ambulances from reaching communities off the highway. The roadblock was later removed without incident, he said.“What the church and our ministry at Standing Rock is trying to do today is to be standing on the rock of what in this is not shifting and moving, and we are trying to get ourselves to that because the violence that erupted yesterday is not something that can be repeated,” he said. “It’s going to cost somebody their life.”Law-enforcement authorities Oct. 28 block Highway 1806, shutting it off to traffic from Fort Rice to Cannonball on the Standing Rock Sioux Nation reservation in North Dakota. Photo: Morton County Sheriff Department via FacebookThat unmoving place is the rock of prayerful, peaceful and nonviolent action, he said. It is also about supporting the Standing Rock Sioux Nation’s desire to have access to clean water. The Sioux also want to protect the sacred area around the Missouri River, inhabited since at least the 1300s, where Native survivors of the Sept. 3, 1863, Whitestone Hill Massacre crossed the river into what is now Cannon Ball, North Dakota, and where the Sioux traded regularly with neighboring Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara tribes, despite sometimes being in conflict, Floberg said. More information about the site is here.Finally, the protection action is not just aimed at the present, he said, but rather for the future “seven generations” and the “children that we will never know.”The disputed 1,154-mile pipeline will run from the Bakken oil fields in northwest North Dakota to Patoka, Illinois, carrying as much as 570,000 barrels of oil a day. Energy Transfer Partners, the Dallas-based company building the pipeline, says construction will create 8,000 to 12,000 local jobs, while the AFL-CIO has pegged the number at 4,500. The construction company also says the pipeline will provide a “more direct, cost-effective, safer and environmentally responsible” way to transport oil and reduce the current use of rail and truck transportationArchambault asked U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch on Oct. 25 to investigate “potential civil rights violations” involving law enforcement’s response to the continuing opposition to the pipeline’s construction.The U.S. Justice Department responded that same day, saying it is monitoring the handling of the Dakota Access Pipeline project to “facilitate communication, defuse tensions, support peaceful protests, and maintain public safety.” – The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Indigenous Ministries, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group October 28, 2016 at 8:08 pm These demonstrators are never peacefully. They have set fires to tires. Open a camp on private property. They blocked the highway. They tied themselves to machines. The Federal Court has ordered the work to continue. The Church has lost its way . It has become the Democratic Party at prayer.. November 4, 2016 at 8:02 pm Look to Matthew! The gospel is spread by actions as well as words. “…the King will say to those on His right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. 35 For I was hungry and you gave Me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave Me something to drink, I was a stranger and you took Me in, 36 I was naked and you clothed Me, I was sick and you looked after Me, I was in prison and you visited Me.’37 Then the righteous will answer Him, ‘Lord, when did we see You hungry and feed You, or thirsty and give You something to drink? 38 When did we see You a stranger and take You in, or naked and clothe You? 39When did we see You sick or in prison and visit You?’40 And the King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of Mine, you did for Me.’” Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Louise Bower says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing October 31, 2016 at 5:42 pm I hope the church is careful in taking sides on a controversy like this. It is hard to get the facts. The church can best be a mediator if it hasn’t taken sides. Jeanette Hargreaves says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ronald Davin says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Suzanne Bennett says: Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY November 8, 2016 at 2:38 am It is interesting that four of the ten “top stories” on my browser deal with a trendy political protest that many Episcopalians don’t support judging by the comments. I don’t think that the resources we contribute to TEC should be used promoting political agendas that divide the church. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL October 28, 2016 at 10:07 pm Actually, it seems the Church has at last found its way! ! We need to always be advocates for the poor and displaced. These nations were here long before the rest of us!!Let’s pray that Fr. John Floberg’s plan for a peaceful witness on Wednesday next will help to quell the hotheads. These people are not “vermin”, they are people fighting for their lives as a nation – water IS life, yes? We need to have a little sense of forgiveness. BTW, Fastening oneself to machinery, gates, or fences is a time-honored strategy of peaceful demonstrators – no one is being harmed except possibly the demonstrator, who may be risking his/her life.ALSO, if law enforcement came to these encounters in something less than battle gear, the reaction might be different. Comments are closed. Suzanne Bennett says: Kenneth Knapp says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET October 28, 2016 at 10:35 pm ENS – for those of us who can’t be there on Nov. 3rd, is there a petition we can sign to join in that way? An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tagscenter_img Donald Heacock says: Priscilla Johnstone says: November 4, 2016 at 7:55 pm Revelation 3:15I know your deeds; you are neither cold nor hot. How I wish you were one or the other. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Francis O’Brien says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Dakota Access Pipeline, October 29, 2016 at 10:38 pm While the Church should certainly be advocates for the poor and displaced, it should not be advocates for law-breaking, intimidation, trespassing, and property damage. While I am sure most were there to protest peacefully, many were not. If TEC is going to jump on this bandwagon it should at least condemn those who use violence to get their point across. So far I’ve seen no condemnation from activists in the Church regarding violent activity, unless of course it’s accusations regarding law enforcement. Terry Francis says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York llola Maoris says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA October 29, 2016 at 12:17 am Louise B: I agree with you. Our PB has reached out to those with no voice in this pipeline development; this is an appropriate ministry for our Church, to support those in need to be seen, heard and respected. Coming on the heels of Flint, MI, we should all be aware of the need for clean, safe water for all our people. Native Americans have traditionally been pushed aside and ignored by our own Government and corporate interests when the land they were forced onto was found to have value, or development was encroaching and their land was determined to be fair game. Too many broken promises, too many betrayals. The Sioux deserve respect, for their culture, their sacred places, and their autonomy. I am proud of the Episcopal Church and proud to join in support efforts in our own community for the Standing Rock Sioux. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (13) Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Suzanne Bennett says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR November 2, 2016 at 7:16 pm With all this time standing with the protesters at standing rock, how do Church officials find time to spread the actual Gospel ? November 4, 2016 at 7:52 pm Condemnation is not a Christian value. From the very first announcement of the Episcopal Church support of the Water Protectors, the church stated that they are in support of the instructions of the elders to engage in peaceful and prayerful protest. See this article:“The NDCIM invites other Episcopalians and people of good will to join us in these efforts.”http://www.episcopalcafe.com/north-dakota-episcopalians-stand-with-pipeline-protestors/The elders continue to express these guidelines, and Water Protectors at Standing Rock tell those who are contemplating coming to help not to come if they intend to be violent or cause trouble. The Standing Rock Sioux continue to ask for prayers of support. Here is one of the most recent calls for prayer:“We all must continue to visualize and intend/pray that the hearts of all involved in this situation continue to open. Police must be held accountable for their actions, though we must continue to welcome them over to the side of the water protectors.”http://themindunleashed.com/2016/11/2-police-officers-turn-in-badges-in-support-of-standing-rock-water-protectors.html Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC November 3, 2016 at 7:00 pm This church seems to have lost its way. Supporting protesters who are breaking the law and who are standing in the way of progress. Water is a commodity owned basically by no one. Water rights belong to the government where it is located. The people standing in the way of developing are nothing more than thugs. They want nothing more than to cause trouble, confusion, and havoc. Few of the so-called indigenous people have any clue as to what the real truths are about the water and the people who would be receiving it. They want to fight just to fight. They should so something that has some meaning and the PB should stay far away from this sort of dispute. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Terry Francis says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 November 3, 2016 at 4:47 am That’s a question Ronald, I wish someone would ask our presiding bishop. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Standing Rock last_img read more

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Stuart Hoke receives Recovery Ministries of the Episcopal Church’s Samuel…

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Featured Events People Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Karyn ZweifelPosted Feb 6, 2017 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Stuart Hoke receives Recovery Ministries of the Episcopal Church’s Samuel Shoemaker Award Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Rev. Stuart Hoke was honored with the Samuel Shoemaker Award at the annual meeting of the Recovery Ministries of the Episcopal Church last November.  In a recent telephone interview, Hoke mentioned the words of Bill W., founder of Alcoholics Anonymous:“Showing others who suffer how we were given help is the very thing which makes life seem so worth while to us now. Cling to the thought that, in God’s hands, the dark past is the greatest possession you have—the key to life and happiness for others….” (Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered from Alcoholism {Fourth Edition}, page 124.)Hoke uses those words to describe his own focus over the past 30 years as a teacher, pastor, priest, mentor and spiritual guide. Since moving to North Carolina in 2008, Hoke has worked as a supply priest throughout the Dioceses of North Carolina and South Carolina, and currently serves as the part-time vicar at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Hamlet, North Carolina. Committed to “spreading the word” about recovery and grace, he is a frequent guest preacher and conference and retreat leader.Hoke became affiliated with Recovery Ministries of the Episcopal Church in the early 1990s. “I consider addiction to be one of the most significant pastoral issues facing the Church. Bridging the gap between the church and recovery has been my crusade since 1987,” he continued. “In both Amarillo and Houston I led Sunday school classes called ‘Spiritual Awakenings.’ The goal of these classes was to illustrate the strong connection between the tenets of Christianity and the principles of 12-step spirituality.“I have been personally involved in recovery for the past 30 years,” he said, calling his involvement redemptive. “This is it. I have received an outpouring of grace, a connection with a fellowship of recovering people, and an opportunity to become the priest that I was called to be in the first place.”“As I travel around the country, as soon as I say the words ‘Episcopal recovery,’ the response I hear is ‘Do you know Stuart Hoke?’ Stuart is traveling all over the country ministering to those who need to hear the good news of recovery for all God’s children,” said the Rev. Deacon Lisa Kirby, president of Recovery Ministries of the Episcopal Church. “I delight in Stuart’s wisdom and humor and can think of no more worthy person to receive this year’s Sam Shoemaker Award.”For the past 12 years, Hoke has pioneered the teaching of two recovery-related courses at The General Theological Seminary. The Very Rev. Ward B. Ewing, D.D. was dean of The General Theological Seminary when those classes were introduced. “When we began the course, General was the only seminary in the Association of Theological Schools to have a course on addiction,” he said. “The class has always received the highest evaluation from the students who recognize the importance of understanding addiction in their pastoral ministries.”Born in Memphis, Tennessee, and raised across the river in northeast Arkansas, Hokegraduated from Southern Methodist University in Dallas before attending the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he received the Master of Divinity degree.Ordained in 1972, Hoke spent the greater part of his ministry serving congregations in Arkansas and Texas. After completing the Master of Sacred Theology degree and the Doctor of Theology degree at New York’s General Theological Seminary, he served as executive assistant to the rector of Trinity Wall Street from 2000-2008, and also as missioner to St. Paul’s Chapel at Ground Zero following the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in September 2001. Hoke moved to North Carolina in 2008.The Recovery Ministries of the Episcopal Church was originally known as the National Episcopal Coalition on Alcohol and Drug Abuse. RMEC is now a separate 501(c)(3) organization of clergy and laity, led by an all-volunteer board. It has been instrumental in bringing the issues of addiction and recovery to the attention of the General Convention, most recently the 2015 resolutions regarding alcohol use and abuse in church settings.“Stuart has educated a generation of clergy to recognize and respond appropriately to the cunning, baffling, and powerful diseases of addiction. His work has a significant impact for the health and vitality of our church,” said Ewing, now retired from GTS and currently serving as non-alcoholic trustee of the General Service Board of Alcoholics Anonymous and past chair of the board. “I cannot imagine a more appropriate recipient for this award.”The Samuel Shoemaker Award is given on an occasional basis. Previous honorees receiving the award include: Betty Ford, the Rev. David Works, The Rt. Rev. David Richards, and Pia Mellody, all major contributors to the spiritual healing of addictions.-Karyn Zweifel is a freelance writer and author living in Birmingham, Alabama. She is a member of St. Andrews Parish in historic Southside. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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‘No le teman a ser personas amorosas,’ dice el Obispo…

first_img Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI ‘No le teman a ser personas amorosas,’ dice el Obispo Primado en el avivamiento en Pittsburgh Un evento de tres días pone en marcha el plan de la Iglesia Episcopal de afirmar una nueva vida y de cambiar el mundo “No le teman a ser personas amorosas. No le teman a defender el nombre de Jesús. No teman a recobrar nuevamente esta fe. Y no se avergüencen de ser episcopales”, dice el obispo primado Michael Curry a la congregación el 4 de febrero durante un oficio eucarístico en el Día de Absalom Jones en la iglesia de la Santa Cruz en la sección Homewood West de Pittsburgh. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Nota de la redacción: Una galería de fotos del avivamiento en Pittsburgh puede verse aquí.[Episcopal News Service – Pittsburgh, Pensilvania] La antigua tradición del avivamiento recibió nueva vida en la Diócesis de Pittsburgh del 3 al 5 de febrero con un acento marcadamente episcopal.El énfasis estuvo tanto en motivar las vidas de fe de los individuos como en comprometerse a mostrar el amor de Jesús más allá de las cuatro paredes de sus iglesias. Afirmar los avivamientos episcopales en las necesidades del mundo fue un tema constante durante el fin de semana.“Iglesia Episcopal, necesitamos que sigas a Jesús. Necesitamos que seas el pueblo contracultural de Dios los que se amarían unos a otros, los que se preocuparían [de los demás] cuando otros podrían mostrarse despreocupados, los que estarían [dispuestos] a dar, más bien que a recibir”, dijo el Obispo Primado durante su sermón del 5 de febrero en la iglesia episcopal de El Calvario [Calvary Episcopal Church] en el barrio Shadyside de Pittsburgh.Para los que piensan las palabras “episcopal” y “avivamiento” no van juntas, la multitud de asistentes, la profundidad de su emoción y la insistencia de Curry les desmiente.Su oración por éste y subsecuentes avivamientos, dijo él durante uno de sus cuatro sermones, es que serán el comienzo de “un camino de nueva vida para nosotros como esta maravillosa Iglesia Episcopal, dando testimonio del amor de Dios en Jesús en esta cultura y en este tiempo en particular de nuestra historia nacional”.El Peregrinaje de la reconciliación, de Curry, sanando y evangelizando en el suroeste de Pensilvania es el primero de seis avivamientos planeados con equipos diocesanos en diferentes ciudades del país y del mundo este año y en 2018.“Quiero sugerir esta mañana que necesitamos un avivamiento dentro y fuera de la Iglesia —no sólo en la Iglesia Episcopal. Porque hay mucho que busca definirse como cristianismo y que no se parece para nada a Jesús”, dijo Curry en su sermón del 4 de febrero durante la eucaristía el día de Absalom Jones en la iglesia episcopal de la Santa Cruz [Episcopal Church of the Holy Cross]. Y si no anda y no habla [como Jesús] y no se parece a Jesús y no huele como Jesús, no es cristiano. Y si va a parecerse a Jesús, va a parecerse al amor”.Curry dijo que el avivamiento de la Iglesia, centrado en el amor de Dios, no consiste en una Iglesia que se rejuvenece para su propio beneficio. El avivamiento de la Iglesia debe derramar el amor de Dios en el mundo “hasta que la justicia corra como impetuoso arroyo”, dijo él citando a Miqueas.Marianne Novy, en primer plano, y John Welch oran juntos el 3 de febrero en la capilla Hicks del Seminario Teológico de Pittsburgh luego de un sermón en que el obispo primado Michael Curry le pidió a los episcopales que ayudaran a remediar las divisiones del mundo. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Para hacer eso, un avivamiento debe canalizar las emociones del momento hacia algo más grande y duradero, dijo Curry durante una conferencia de prensa. “Se trata de afirmar una vida nueva y auténtica y genuina. Eso es la verdad para nuestra nación, y es la verdad para nuestro mundo. Debemos encontrar mejores medios de vivir juntos, de cuidar los unos de los otros, de cuidar a nuestra sociedad y de cuidar a nuestras comunidades globales”, dijo él.“Nosotros que somos seguidores de Jesús creemos que el camino del amor y el camino de Jesús son la clave para hacer eso. Pero unimos nuestras manos con personas de otras religiones y con personas de buena voluntad —cualquiera que quiera ayudarnos a terminar lo que tan a menudo es una pesadilla de pobreza e injusticia y prejuicio y maldad y violencia, y llevar a cabo el sueño de Dios de verdadera armonía y paz y justicia para todos”.Los seis avivamiento variarán en diseño, según un reciente comunicado de prensa, pero la mayoría serán eventos de varios días que incluirán culto dinámico y predicación, presentaciones de artistas y músicos locales, testimonios y narraciones personales, oradores, invitaciones a la acción social local, participación con líderes jóvenes y deliberada actividad comunitaria con personas que no son activas  en una comunidad de fe. A los episcopales de Pittsburgh se les instó a traer con ellos a vecinos que no formaran parte de una comunidad religiosa.Los próximos cinco avivamientos son:Mayo 5-7: Diócesis de Misurí OccidentalSeptiembre 23-24: Diócesis de GeorgiaNoviembre 17-19: Diócesis de San Joaquín (California)Abril 6-8 de 2018: Diócesis de HondurasJulio de 2018: Misión de Evangelización Conjunta con la Iglesia de Inglaterra.La Rda. Stephanie Spellers, canóniga del Obispo Primado para la evangelización, la reconciliación y la creación, está organizando esos esfuerzos junto con un equipo que incluye a Carrie Headington, evangelista consultora para avivamientos y la asociada de evangelización Emily Gallagher. La planificación para cada uno [de los eventos] comienza con preguntarles a los miembros de la diócesis cómo se presentan las buenas nuevas de Jesús en sus comunidades. Los episcopales de Pittsburgh entendieron que las buenas nuevas les ayudarían a salvar las líneas divisorias de su zona, entablar relaciones con sus vecinos de diferentes tradiciones y comenzar a reconciliarse los unos con los otros, dijo Spellers durante la conferencia de prensa. Luego, ese fue el tema de la reunión de Pittsburgh.Ellas y otros regresarán a las diócesis después de los avivamientos para colaborar con los episcopales en el cultivo de un grupo de líderes que tienen nuevos talentos, nuevas relaciones y un nuevo propósito común de llevar adelante el amor de Jesús en sus comunidades.“Esperemos que Pittsburgh —no sólo la diócesis, sino la ciudad y sus comunidades circunvecinas— se muestren diferentes. Y  perciban que había una Iglesia que se personó, no sólo para hablar de las buenas nuevas, sino para ser las buenas nuevas”, dijo ella al describir el resultado esperado. Los episcopales entenderán que se han convertido en nuevos líderes del Movimiento de Jesús, añadió.El llamado de Curry a la reconciliación y a la recuperación se dejó oír por primera vez durante el evento de apertura el 3 de febrero, un servicio ecuménico de arrepentimiento y reconciliación en la capilla de Hicks del Seminario Teológico de Pittsburgh.“Cada vez estoy más convencido de que Jesús vino entre nosotros a mostrarnos como llegar a ser más que simplemente la raza humana”, dijo Curry. “Vino a mostrarnos cómo llegar a ser la familia humana de Dios. Y, mis hermanos y hermanas, en eso radica nuestra esperanza y en eso radica nuestro llamado”.El obispo primado Michael Curry predica el 3 de febrero en el Seminario Teológico de Pittsburgh. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Dios llama a los cristianos a un profundo y radical sentido de arrepentimiento, dijo Curry. El mundo necesita de esa manifestación de cristianismo, arguyó él, porque conducirá a una reconciliación que se necesita desesperadamente entre una letanía de grupos étnicos e incluso entre “rojos y azules”, refiriéndose a las divisiones políticas de la nación. Encontrar medios de que republicanos y demócratas descubran un terreno común [fue un tema que] se repitió en los sermones de Curry.La congregación reaccionó a las palabras de Curry en el seminario con murmullos de asentimiento, expresiones de acuerdo y, poco después, redobles de tambores y ostinatos de teclados del coro de la iglesia bautista misionera de la Calle Rodman, cuyos miembros también cantaron durante el oficio. La participación del público fue notable en los cuatros sermones de Curry durante el fin de semana y ello incluyó al Obispo Primado dirigiendo a la congregación en un cántico.Curry sacó a relucir un tema que se repetiría durante el fin de semana: los cristianos deben ser personas compasivas, personas de buena voluntad, personas que se atreven a vivir el Sermón del Monte y las palabras de Jesús en Mateo 25:31-46. Por ejemplo, dijo él, las personas que establecen una política social o que promulgan una legislación deben medirla por el valor humano intrínseco de “ama a tu prójimo como a ti mismo”.Doce líderes e importantes pastores de iglesias locales, catolicorromanas, ortodoxas  protestantes y afroamericanas se reunieron con líderes electos y cívicos y miembros de la Diócesis de Pittsburgh para el oficio que muchos llamaron un compromiso histórico con el diálogo ecuménico. El servicio de avivamiento comenzó con una reconfirmación del compromiso del clero con su ministerio. El obispo catolicorromano de Pittsburgh, David Zubik, comenzó una confesión en 10 partes basada en el Reto Ministerial de la Iglesia de Escocia de 1671, que lamenta la atención del clero a los negocios y recompensas del mundo. “Hemos sido infieles a nuestras propias almas, y a nuestros hermanas y hermanos; infieles en el púlpito, en la fraternidad, en la disciplina y en la Iglesia”, dijo Zubik.El obispo primado Michael Curry hace rondas en la cripta de la iglesia de Santa Cruz durante la reunión desayuno del 4 de febrero con jóvenes de la diócesis de Pittsburgh. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Curry se reunió a la mañana siguiente con algunos de los jóvenes de la diócesis en la Santa Cruz en el precario barrio Homewood West  de Pittsburgh. Diciéndoles que ellos estaban creciendo en un momento de cambio complejo, él expresó que el progreso tecnológico es importante pero que “el progreso como un camino del amor, el progreso de vivir, el progreso de aprender a vivir juntos con todas nuestras diferencias y variedades puede ser el progreso definitivo que marcará la diferencia para todos nosotros”.Después de la reunión del desayuno [en la cripta de la iglesia], Curry subió para una emocionante eucaristía por el Día de Absalom Jones en la nave repleta. Durante su sermón, el Obispo Primado continuó su llamado a los cristianos a actuar motivador por el amor abnegado del que Jesús nos dio ejemplo en la cruz y no por un “torpe egoísmo”.Diciendo que “el camino del amor puede salvarnos a todos” Curry le pidió a la congregación que imaginara cuán diferentes serían las legislaturas, los salones de juntas corporativas, las escuelas y los centros de salud en Estados Unidos si los motivara “no lo que yo puedo sacar de esto, sino cómo puedo servir al bien común”.“Estamos hablando de una revolución de valores”, dijo, habiendo dejado el púlpito para predicar desde el pasillo central. “Avivamiento significa dar vida; es resurrección. Imagínense a nuestro país, imagínense lo que le diríamos al inmigrante y al refugiado, imagínense lo que un norteamericano le diría al resto del mundo, imagínense lo que el resto del mundo nos diría si ese camino del amor  se convirtiera en nuestro camino”.Absalom Jones, el primer afroamericano ordenado sacerdote en la Iglesia Episcopal, se destaca encima de un Jesús negro en un mural pintado en la pared de la capilla lateral de la iglesia de la Santa Cruz en la sección Homewood West de Pittsburgh. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Llegando al final de su sermón, Curry le dijo a la congregación: “No le teman a ser personas amorosas. No le teman a defender el nombre de Jesús. No teman de recobrar nuevamente esta fe. Y no se avergüencen de ser episcopales”.Como una especie de llamado episcopal al altar, Curry invitó a los presentes a cantar “There Is a Balm in Gilead” en el cual se le dice a los cristianos que no importa si no son buenos en la predicación y la oración. Que les bastaría simplemente con contarle a alguien acerca del amor de Jesús. “Mientras cantamos, los invito a comprometerse de nuevo —o a comprometerse— a seguir el camino de Jesús, a ser parte de su movimiento en este mundo”, dijo el Obispo Primado.Un vídeo de todo el oficio eucarístico puede encontrarse aquí. El sermón del Obispo Primado comienza a los 22 minutos, 6 segundos.Curry regresó al Seminario Teológico de Pittsburgh esa tarde para dar la bienvenida a episcopales y otras personas de toda la diócesis para un conversatorio que se anunció como “Salvando divisiones y restaurando comunidades” y que se proponía en principio entablar relaciones entre individuos e iglesias con la esperanza de que puedan trabajar juntos  en abordar la desesperanza, la pobreza y la adicción en las comunidades locales.Kim Karashin, canóniga de Pittsburgh para la misión, dijo a Episcopal News Service antes de que empezara el conversatorio que “el mejor escenario” para la reunión sería que las personas convinieran en reunirse de nuevo para conversar acerca de estos temas, pero que esta reunión fuera para conocerse unos a otros. “No vamos a dar puntada sin haber creado las relaciones”, dijo ella.El obispo primado Michael Curry escucha, el 4 de febrero, mientras el alcalde de Pittsburgh, Bill Peduto, encomia los esfuerzos de la Iglesia Episcopal de tender puentes entre los divididos barrios de la ciudad. El Alcalde habló en el Seminario Teológico de Pittsburgh antes de un conversatorio orientado hacia la formación de relaciones entre individuos e iglesias con la esperanza de que puedan trabajar juntos para abordar la desesperanza, la pobreza y la adicción en las comunidades locales. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.El alcalde de Pittsburgh, Bill Peduto, que participó en la bienvenida a los asistentes al conversatorio, dijo más tarde, durante la conferencia de prensa, que Pittsburgh es una comunidad dividida que necesita esta especie de entrenamiento en la conversación para cultivar a líderes que puedan intervenir en situaciones de emergencia e intentar inducir a las personas a modos productivos de actuar.“Unir una comunidad sólo se logra con cosas como ésta”, dijo. “Ustedes tienen que ser proactivos; no pueden esperar a que algo pase. Emprender estas acciones es lo que ayudará a tender los puentes de los que hablamos”.El último día del avivamiento en Pittsburgh incluyó dos oficios eucarísticos: el primero en la iglesia episcopal de El Calvario, y el segundo a unos 40 minutos de distancia [en auto], en la iglesia episcopal de San Esteban [St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church] en McKeesport, en la zona económicamente deprimida del valle del río Monongahela  al sur de Pittsburgh. Representantes de casi tres docenas de congregaciones episcopales se reunieron en San Esteben para apoyar “la Misión de Mon Valley” que es un nuevo empeño para revivir la fe y el bienestar de las comunidades del río.Curry se valió del evangelio de esa mañana, la historia de Jesús y la mujer samaritana en el pozo para decirle a la congregación de McKeesport que Dios insta a tender puentes entre las personas que la sociedad dice que son enemigos. En su conversación junto al pozo, dijo Curry, tanto Jesús como la mujer samaritana aprenden algo acerca del otro y de sí mismos. Además, la mujer descubrió dentro de ella la imagen de Dios y experimentó el amor de Dios siendo activo en su vida, explicó él.Luego, dijo Curry, ella se convirtió en “la primera evangelista en el Nuevo Testamento” cuando le contó a sus vecinos lo que le había sucedido en el pozo con Jesús.Cada persona en San Esteban recibió una pequeña concha con una cruz roja pintada, un antiguo signo de los peregrinos que  simbolizaba su peregrinación para llevar las buenas nuevas de Jesús al mundo. El oficio terminó cuando Curry comisionó a las 320 personas asistentes a ser discípulos  compartiendo las buenas nuevas de Jesús.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 8, 2017 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

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MacDonald reflects on 10 years as national indigenous Anglican bishop

first_imgMacDonald reflects on 10 years as national indigenous Anglican bishop Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion, Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Indigenous Ministries Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Sep 19, 2017 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET “More has happened in these 10 years than I ever imagined possible,” says Mark MacDonald about his role as national indigenous Anglican bishop. Photo: Art Babych[Anglican Journal] Every Sunday for the past decade, Canadian Anglicans have offered prayers for “our national indigenous bishop, Mark MacDonald.”For some, perhaps, it is a name that conjures little—another in a list of diocesan and national figures who have little directly to do with their home parish. Others may know MacDonald for his involvement in reconciliation and Indigenous activism, or for his sermons on environmental justice, or his columns in the Anglican Journal—or even for his talent on the acoustic guitar at a gospel jamboree.But MacDonald (and more importantly, the office he holds) is also the most visible example of structural change in a church still struggling to build a more equitable relationship with its First Nations, Inuit and Métis members.“People recognize…that [MacDonald] has this position, and behind him is this big ministry for indigenous peoples,” says Donna Bomberry, who was co-ordinator for indigenous ministries for the Anglican Church of Canada when MacDonald was first appointed to the role in 2007. “He lends himself well to that, brings respect and dignity to that position for our people.”On January 4, 2007, MacDonald made history by becoming the first national bishop representing the interests of all indigenous Anglicans across Canada. Photo: General Synod CommunicationsThe position of National Indigenous Anglican Bishop was created a little more than a decade ago, following a proposal at the 2005 Anglican Indigenous Sacred Circle (the national body that meets triennially to manage the affairs of indigenous Anglicans).Sacred Circle tasked the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP) with presenting a “fit and qualified” nominee who was both Indigenous and an Anglican bishop to then-Primate Andrew Hutchison for formal approval. Bomberry recalls that MacDonald, then serving as bishop of Alaska in The Episcopal Church (TEC), was selected because ACIP found his vision for the indigenous Anglican church to be very much in line with their own.“We wanted to realize our Covenant, our Indigenous self-determining church, and we wanted him to help us in that journey,” she says, adding that she is “ever so pleased” he agreed to take on the role. “He’s the point of the wedge leading the way—which can be a difficult position also.”Teresa Mandricks, program associate in the secretariat of the national indigenous Anglican bishop, who was also involved in the interview process, noted that his charismatic, easygoing nature and democratic approach to decision-making was an important factor in choosing him.“He was cool, you know? He just had a charisma…that you know you can just go to him and talk,” she says, remembering the first time she met him, at the 1997 meeting of Sacred Circle.On January 4, 2007, MacDonald made history by becoming the first national bishop representing the interests of all indigenous Anglicans across Canada.The making of an indigenous bishopWhile he now operates out of a corner office in downtown Toronto, and spends his time criss-crossing Canada and the globe, MacDonald’s early years were spent in the small port city of Duluth, Minnesota, where he was born on January 15, 1954.MacDonald recalls his family situation as being “troubled,” and his grandfather’s experience as a residential school survivor cast a long shadow of intergenerational trauma over the future bishop’s childhood. But it also prepared him for the kind of ministry he would spend much of his adult life engaging in.“Those problems [of trauma] aren’t confined to indigenous people,” he says. “There was a lot of alcohol abuse in my family, and that gave me a lot of insight into some of the things that were going on in other people’s situations.”National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald and his ubiquitous acoustic guitar. Photo: Marites SisonMacDonald heard a call to the priesthood while still in his teens, a development he sees as being deeply connected to the experiences he had growing up.“I had a troubled family situation, and a strong feeling that the church could have played a stronger role in my life and others like me,” he recalls. “I had a strong feeling that I wanted to work for the good in people’s lives.”This was amplified by the number of important clergy mentors he encountered while pursuing a bachelor’s degree at the College of St. Scholastica, a Benedictine university in Duluth. A professor named Caroline Schmidt, MacDonald says, “constantly put theology in the context of the prayer of the church.”After graduating from St. Scholastica, he studied at Wycliffe College in Toronto, receiving an MDiv in 1978 and beginning his ministry as a priest in the diocese of Minnesota the next year.Like many young priests, he struggled to discern exactly what he was being called to do. For MacDonald, the answer came while serving as rector at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Portland, Ore. Shortly after he arrived, the parish began to foster an indigenous mission congregation, which MacDonald became priest-in-charge of.When he left St. Stephen’s in 1989, it was to immerse himself completely in ministry to Indigenous people—specifically, the Navajo of the Episcopal Church’s Navajoland Area Ministry at the juncture between Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah.It was here, MacDonald says, that his own indigenous Anglican perspective began to take shape, influenced by the perspectives of the elders around him, whose theology was rooted in an understanding of the gospel and the world that he believes is closer to that of the early church than they are to 20th-century Western Christianity.“The wisdom of Navajo elders gives insight into the gospel stories in a way that is really, really helpful, and very important, I think,” he recalls. “I felt like a was living in the New Testament.”Five years later, though, a job opened up back in Minnesota, and MacDonald felt it was time to go home. In 1997, he put himself forward as a candidate for seventh bishop of Alaska. He was consecrated September 13 of that year, and would spend the next decade based out of Fairbanks, Alaska.“As I said at the time, it’s the only place I could imagine wanting to be bishop, and the only place that I can imagine anyone wanting me to be a bishop,” MacDonald recalls with a chuckle.Toward reconciliation and self-determinationIn the months following the 2005 Sacred Circle, MacDonald was approached by ACIP. Would he be willing to consider standing as a candidate for the new position the Anglican Church of Canada had created?Ruth Kitchekesik (left), deacon of St. Matthew’s Anglican Church in Kingfisher Lake, Ontario, and National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald join the 2015 Walk for Reconciliation. Photo: Marites SisonMacDonald says he knew immediately that, despite the challenges, this was an opportunity he couldn’t pass up.“I felt that there would be great difficulties, but there probably wasn’t anything, missiologically speaking, that was more important and more critical in North America,” he says.Not that this made stepping into the new role easier. Not only was MacDonald faced with the enormous challenge of shaping a completely new episcopate, he also needed to convince his fellow bishops that his work wasn’t a threat to their own.“Not everyone was happy with the creation of the position,” he recalls.Navigating his new role was not just about facing the expectations of his Indigenous constituents, it was also about reassuring his fellow bishops that he would respect their own jurisdictions.He would face this balancing act again and again in the coming years, as he worked to build better ties between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Anglicans.“He’s the go-between,” says Mandricks, describing MacDonald’s position as a leader who must have a foot in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous worlds.This position was vital in the years following 2007. Not only was the indigenous Anglican church breaking a new trail toward the creation of a fully self-determined Indigenous Anglican church, Canadian Anglicans as a whole were wrestling with their church’s colonial history, through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). The commission held its first national event in Winnipeg in 2010, and would hold six more before it released its final report in June 2015.While most of his involvement with the TRC was pastoral, MacDonald says he thinks the commission’s work has done much to raise the profile of Indigenous Anglicans’ struggle for self-determination.“Although we still face a number of the problems and issues that we’ve had all along, we have a very different horizon than we did 10 years ago, and I think that has a lot to do with the TRC.”When asked about the nature of these ongoing issues, MacDonald says a lot of it comes down to institutional racism that manifests itself as a paternalistic attitude toward Indigenous peoples.National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald and his wife, Virginia, at the 2009 Sacred Circle. Photo: Marites Sison“Paternalism is really the source of a lot of the problems that indigenous people have,” he says. “Decisions about them are made far away from them, [and] what most people assume when they see the problems that result from that paternalism is that more paternalism would help.”In attempting to break this cycle, indigenous Anglicans want greater control over their own affairs, and a greater ability to minister to their own people in their own way. MacDonald is optimistic that it’s just a matter of time, in part because of the way he has seen indigenous leadership develop in the time he has been bishop.MacDonald speaks with particular pride of the number of indigenous leaders who have taken their places on the national stage—like Lydia Mamakwa, bishop of the Indigenous Spiritual Ministry of Mishamikoweesh, and Adam Halkett, bishop of Missinippi in the diocese of Saskatchewan.“More has happened in these 10 years than I ever imagined possible,” he says.This year marks the 20th anniversary of MacDonald’s consecration as bishop, and in 2019 he will have been serving the church as an ordained minister for 40 years. So is the Canadian Anglican church’s first National indigenous bishop thinking about slowing down?The answer comes quickly. “I’m too busy thinking about what has to happen in the next few months to think beyond that,” he says. “My dreams are not big enough for what God’s plans are.” New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

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Ugandan Mothers’ Union leader helps overcome HIV

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Health & Healthcare, Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Africa, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest HIV/AIDS, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls [Anglican Communion News Service] A lay Anglican woman in Uganda is helping to build an HIV-competent community and church in a country where the epidemic is still a big challenge. Josephine Kasaato is president of the Mothers’ Union in the Namirembe Diocese in the capital of Uganda, Kampala. She is using her position to create awareness and educate the community about HIV and AIDS. Her voice is often heard across the diocese’s 65 parishes where she censures stigma, discrimination and denial – key challenges in the struggle against the virus.Read the entire article here. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ugandan Mothers’ Union leader helps overcome HIV Posted Nov 3, 2017 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Women’s Ministry Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

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Se abre el proceso de concesión de becas para los…

first_img Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Milton Omar Rápalo says: Martin Hernandez says: Se abre el proceso de concesión de becas para los Ministerios de Jóvenes Adultos y Campus Grants & Scholarships, Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Youth & Young Adults Press Release Service Submit a Press Release January 9, 2018 at 7:15 pm Buenas noches me gustaría obtener beca de estudio para prepararme mejor soy de escasos recursos económicos y eso me impide una mejor educación Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Posted Jan 2, 2018 Comments (2) El proceso de concesión de becas para los Ministerios de Jóvenes Adultos y Campus 2018 está abierto. Las becas brindan fondos para las diócesis, las congregaciones y los centros de estudios superiores/universitarios comunitarios/tribales para un ministerio episcopal (o un ministerio ecuménico con participación episcopal).Estas becas son para el año lectivo 2018-2019. Un total de 138.000 dólares está disponible para el ciclo 2018-2019 de un total de 400.000 dólares que está disponible para el trienio.CategoríasHay cuatro categorías de becas:• Beca de liderazgo: para establecer un nuevo ministerio de campus, restaurar uno latente o re-energizar uno actual.  La beca oscilará entre los 20.000 a 30.000 dólares que pueden ser utilizados dentro de un periodo de dos años.• Becas para ministerio de campus: proveen capital inicial para ayudar la puesta en marcha de ministerios de campus nuevos e innovadores o para mejorar un ministerio existente. Las becas oscilarán entre los 3.000 a 5.000 dólares.• Becas para ministerio de jóvenes adultos: proveen capital inicial para asistir en el inicio de ministerios de jóvenes adultos nuevos e innovadores o para mejorar un ministerio existente. Las becas oscilarán entre los 3.000 a 5.000 dólares.• Becas para proyectos: proveen fondos para un proyecto único que aumentará el impacto del ministerio de jóvenes adultos y campus. Las becas son de 100 a 1.000 dólares.ProcesoEl proceso consiste en tres etapas:• Planeación y discernimiento de la beca (descargue el PDF)• Completar la solicitud de beca (descargue el documento de Word)• Completar y enviar la solicitud aquí. La solicitud debe completarse en su totalidad y enviarse en línea. El formulario de solicitud de becas e información adicional están disponibles siguiendo este enlace.Las solicitudes serán revisadas por un equipo que incluye a los Coordinadores Provinciales del Ministerio de Campus, líderes en el ministerio de jóvenes adultos, miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo y personal de la Iglesia Episcopal.Cronología• La fecha límite para presentar las solicitudes es el 2 de febrero a las 10 de la noche, hora del este de los Estados Unidos / 9 p. m. hora del Centro / 8 p. m., hora de Montaña  / 7 p. m., hora del Pacífico.• Del 3 al 16 de febrero las solicitudes de becas son leidas y evaluadas por un equipo de revisores.• Del 17 al 28 de febrero los revisores de las becas se reúnen para discernir y hacer recomendaciones al Consejo Ejecutivo.• El 5 de marzo se envían las recomendaciones al Consejo Ejecutivo.• El Consejo Ejecutivo se reúne del 21 al 23 de abril y toma decisiones.• Del 25 al 27 de abril se preparan y envían por correo las cartas para las solicitudes exitosas.• El 30 de abril las becas son anunciadas.Para más información comuníquese con Valerie Harris, asociada de formación en [email protected] Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL January 9, 2018 at 3:25 pm Hola Buenos Días soy el reverendo Martin Hernandez de la Iglesia Episcopal en Colombia me interesaría conocer mas sobre los requisitos para los miembros de mi parroquia en Cucuta. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

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Executive Council to vote on 2 racial justice resolutions responding…

first_imgExecutive Council to vote on 2 racial justice resolutions responding to black victims of violence Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By David PaulsenPosted Jun 9, 2020 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Executive Council, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL George Floyd, Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Executive Council June 2020, center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council will consider this week two resolutions amplifying the church’s opposition to violence against people of color, in the name of George Floyd and other recent victims of violence by police and white vigilantes.Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Mission Within The Episcopal Church, meeting online June 9 in a Zoom session, voted to recommend one resolution responding to the killing of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia and a second resolution about several recent killings by police of black citizens, including Floyd in Minnesota.House of Deputies Vice President Byron Rushing, from the Diocese of Massachusetts, speaks June 9 during a Zoom session of the Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Mission Within The Episcopal Church.House of Deputies Vice President Byron Rushing, who also helped to draft the resolution on police brutality, presented the Arbery resolution to the committee. Though the recent killings collectively have inspired widespread protests against racial injustice over the past two weeks, Rushing said he and other Episcopal leaders thought it appropriate to speak separately on the Feb. 23 killing of Arbery by a white father and son. Arbery was jogging in Glynn County, Georgia, when he was attacked.“This was a very different kind of killing. This was borderline lynching,” Rushing said. “We don’t want to confuse this with the killings that have been moving so many people now, which are killings by the police.”The resolution begins by invoking the Executive Council’s visit to the Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice during its October 2019 meeting in Montgomery, Alabama. It then connects lynchings and other historic forms of racial terror with the attack on Arbery. The resolution condemns authorities’ delay of more than two months in arresting Arbery’s attackers, and it praises the Episcopalians in the dioceses of Georgia and Atlanta for their public calls for justice.The Rev. Devon Anderson, a Minnesota priest, presented the resolution regarding police brutality. It references Floyd and Breonna Taylor by name. Floyd died May 25 after repeating “I can’t breathe” while a white Minneapolis officer pinned him to the ground for nearly nine minutes, pressing his knee into Floyd’s neck. Taylor was shot and killed March 13 by white police officers during an overnight raid of her home in Louisville, Kentucky.The Rev. Devon Anderson, a priest in Minnesota, addresses Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Mission Within The Episcopal Church on June 9.“The idea here is focusing on acknowledging the brutality and the violence … and then raising up for the wider church efforts that are going on the ground as models, particularly around community engagement,” Anderson said.The resolution highlights the racial justice work of Episcopalians in Minnesota and Kentucky. Referencing a 2018 General Convention resolution on police violence and racism, Episcopalians are further urged to “join community and grassroots leaders in advocating … substantive and mandatory change in police departments and policing and to allocate resources for community-based models of safety, support and prevention.”The committee also was scheduled this week to discuss a resolution responding to the disproportionate toll that the COVID-19 pandemic has taken on communities of color. Another resolution that advocates criminal justice and police reforms was reviewed June 9, but a different committee will take the lead on discussing and recommending the measure.Executive Council is meeting online June 8-11 after it canceled plans to meet in person in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The pandemic has forced all church governance meetings to shift online, starting with the House of Bishops’ meeting in early March.The resolutions on violence against people of color are scheduled for a final vote of the full Executive Council on June 11, along with potential budget revisions made necessary by disruptions caused by the pandemic and public health precautions that prompted suspensions of in-person worship across the country.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected]’s note: An earlier version of this story reported that Executive Council was considering a resolution that referenced the shooting death of David McAtee by authorities who were clearing the scene of a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Committee members on June 10 voted to remove the reference to McAtee from the resolution. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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Paul-Gordon Chandler elected 10th bishop of Wyoming

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler, bishop-elect of Wyoming. Photo courtesy Diocese of Wyoming[Diocese of Wyoming] The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler was elected on Sept. 19 to be the 10th bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Wyoming. Chandler succeeds the Rt. Rev. John S. Smylie upon his retirement in 2021.Chandler is the rector of the Anglican Church in Qatar (The Church of the Epiphany & The Anglican Center) in the Persian Gulf, a church that hosts 85 other church congregations of varying sizes, in addition to its own. Serving as an appointed mission partner with The Episcopal Church, he is an Episcopal priest, author, peace builder and art curator. He grew up in Senegal, West Africa, and has lived and worked around the world in leadership roles with The Episcopal Church, faith-based publishing, the arts and Christian relief and development agencies. He is also the founding president of Caravan, an international peace building nonprofit closely associated with The Episcopal Church that uses the arts to build sustainable peace around the world and which has held several strategic interreligious art exhibitions throughout Wyoming.Chandler was elected on the second ballot out of a field of three nominees. He received 52 votes of 89 cast in the lay order and 53 of 70 cast in the clergy order. The electing convention was held at the Casper Events Center in Casper, Wyoming.The bishop-elect addressed the convention attendees via Zoom from Qatar, where he is in a brief quarantine due to COVID-19 concerns because of his recent visit to the United States.“I’ve never had a day like this,” he said. “I am profoundly humbled and look forward to serving with all of you.”Chandler thanked “everyone who had prayed during the election process.” And he emphasized, “I will appreciate the privilege of working alongside you.”The Electing Convention had many changes due to COVID-19. Only designated voters were allowed to attend. The convention was livestreamed through Facebook, and voting was done by electronic means.The election requires consent from the majority of diocesan bishops and standing committees. Assuming that consent is received, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry is scheduled to ordain Chandler as the 10th bishop of Wyoming on Feb. 13, 2021, in Casper, Wyoming.The Episcopal Diocese of Wyoming is made up of 46 churches with approximately 6,500 members throughout the state of Wyoming.The other nominees were the Rev. David Duprey, an active-duty Navy chaplain, and the Rev. Mary Erickson, associate priest at St. John’s Church in Jackson, Wyoming.More information can be found at diowy.org. Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Elections, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska People Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Paul-Gordon Chandler elected 10th bishop of Wyoming Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Posted Sep 21, 2020 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

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Meaningful, moving ways to support veterans this Memorial Day

first_img Reply TAGSMemorial Day Previous articleKilsheimer surprises Council with LANGD Board recommendationsNext articleNASA Says “Don’t Look Up” Today Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR May 10, 2016 at 4:39 pm You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter We should have a veterans park in Apopka to honor our men and women who served to let them know we appreciate and respect them! Time to create one! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom “All gave some. Some gave all.” You likely hear that phrase around Memorial Day every year, but do you know its origin? Or what Memorial Day is supposed to mean to the veterans who gave some, the survivors of those who gave all, and the Americans who enjoy continued freedom because of those sacrifices?Americans, it seems, do understand the importance of Memorial Day. A 2015 poll by Rasmussen Reports found 52 percent of those polled viewed Memorial Day as one of the nation’s most important holidays, while 42 percent saw it as at least somewhat important.When Americans first began observing the day in the late 1860s, they were pausing to remember the more than half a million Americans who had died in the then-recently ended Civil War. Today, Memorial Day observances not only remember the sacrifice of the deceased who gave all, but also the thousands of living veterans, many of whom are wounded in body, mind or both.“Amid the celebrations marking the unofficial start of the summer season, it can be difficult to find meaningful ways to observe Memorial Day,” says Jeff Roy, chairman of the board of the Purple Heart Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides counseling, support and advocacy for Purple Heart recipients, and raises funds for programs that support veterans and their families. “But Americans truly do want to express their gratitude to veterans for their many sacrifices. Fortunately, there are many ways they can help make a difference for veterans.”Here are some meaningful ways you can show your support for veterans this Memorial Day:* Help provide a service dog to a veteran with physical disabilities or PTSD. The National Education for Assistance Dog Services (NEADS) provides service dogs for free to qualifying veterans. You can help by making an online donation, sponsor a “doggie dorm” for service dogs in training, raise a puppy who will become a service dog, or become a volunteer. Visit the organization’s website at www.neads.org to learn more.* Donate to the Purple Heart Foundation’s scholarship program, which provides financial support to Purple Heart recipients and their families for college-related expenses like tuition, books, and room and board.* Instead of spending the day indulging in your own cookout, contact the local veterans’ home or veterans’ hospital and volunteer there for the day. Or, you can simply take an hour or two to visit with the residents there and thank them for their service.* Visit the local cemetery and place flags or flowers on the graves of veterans. Contact the cemetery first for their visiting guidelines and to learn where the veterans section is located – many cemeteries have special sections set aside for veterans.* Help ensure veterans make the most of the services available to them. Donate to the Purple Heart Foundation’s National Service Officers Program, which helps pay to place service officers in Veterans Administration facilities across the country. These officers are specially trained to help veterans access the many benefits, programs and services available to them.* If your community sponsors a Memorial Day parade, attending is a great way to show your appreciation and support for veterans – but you can do even more. Prior to the event, contact the parade organizers and find out what veterans groups will be marching in the parade. Offer to donate water, snacks or anything else the veterans may need to make their walk easier and more enjoyable.* Pick up the phone and call the veterans in your life – almost everyone knows at least one person who has served in the military. Perhaps your grandfather served in World War II, the Korean War or Vietnam. You may know someone who has recently returned from serving in the Global War on Terror. Take some time to let those people know you’re thinking of them, and appreciate their service.* Observe the National Moment of Remembrance at 3 p.m. on Memorial Day, Monday, May 30. Established by Congress, the one-minute observance is an chance for all Americans to pause in the middle of their summer celebrations to remember the sacrifices of the nation’s veterans.From simple and small to noble and industrious, it’s possible to find many meaningful ways to honor all who gave some and the some who gave all. And as for that now-famous phrase – it was first uttered by Howard William Osterkamp of Dent, Ohio, a Korean War veteran and recipient of the Purple Heart.center_img 1 COMMENT Please enter your comment! Tenita Reid Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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