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Leicester fever hits Pembroke

first_imgAs thousands across the country celebrated Leicester’s unlikely win of the Premier League, four Oxford students forfeited their bop to head to Leicester at midnight and join in the celebrations.The students at Pembroke College decided to make the trip up to the East Midlands after learning that the underdogs had won the title, despite having started the season with 5000-1 odds of lifting the Premier League trophy.Their victory was announced after Tottenham Hotspurs failed to beat Chelsea, awarding Leicester their first league title win in 132 years.At least a thousand fans gathered at King Power stadium to watch the Spurs Chelsea game, with many more descending on the streets of Leicester after the result.After Pembroke’s annual sports dinner, the quartet suggested joining the thousand strong crowds celebrating in Leicester and by midnight they were in a taxi on their way to the city.They arrived at Jamie Vardy’s House only 15 minutes after Vardy’s party had come to end, instead having to settle with a selfie taken by his front door.After trips to King Power Stadium, a nightclub and Leicester Cathedral to visit Richard III, the students returned to Pembroke at 8:15 the next morning, with one even heading straight to lectures upon his return.None of the students is a Leicester fan, but they have all been following the club’s title bid from November.Jack Harrison, one of the second year students who made the trip, commented, “One of the best decisions I’ve ever made. I’ve never experienced human joy to the extent I did in the club in Leicester.“Sports runs the continuum of existence and our second year will always be synonymous with Leicester’s bid for the title. We have followed right from start and we have been on such a journey with Leicester we wanted to follow it through to the end.“We backed Vardy early doors, ever since their 3-0 win over Newcastle. I thought that they would probably win the title once Spurs drew with Liverpool.”Pembroke undergraduate Nathan Wragg told Cherwell, “It was one of the best nights of my life. It really was a once in a lifetime opportunity and I am so happy we made the spontaneous decision to go. It is a trip I will not be forgetting any time soon.”The Oxford students also met with another group of boys, none of which were life-long Leicester City fans prior to this season, but had made the trip down to Leicester from Leeds University.They featured on BBC news for their endeavours the next morning, still out and going strong at 7am the next morning.last_img read more

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Tesco profits slump again

first_imgSupermarket giant Tesco has this morning reported a 6% fall in group trading annual profit to £3.3bn – the second year in a row it has announced falling profits.Unveiling its preliminary results for the 52 weeks until 22 February, 2014, it said like-for-like sales also fell by 1.4%The company also announced a £734m loss of value in its European business, which has been hit by the eurozone crisis. In Europe, group trading profit fell 28% to £238m as sales in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia and Turkey, as well as Ireland, all slumped.Group trading profit was also down 5.6% in Asia to £692m.Philip Clarke, Tesco’s under-fire chief executive, said: “We are transforming Tesco through a relentless focus on providing the most compelling offer for our customers. Our results today reflect the challenges we face in a trading environment which is changing more rapidly than ever before. We are determined to lead the industry in this period of change.”Tesco’s core UK market share has fallen to a near 10-year low.last_img read more

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Eat names Mike Rainer as new managing director

first_imgFood-to-go retailer Eat has named Mike Rainer as its new managing director.The move follows the departure of CEO Andrew Walker, who has left the retailer to pursue other interests.Rainer, who was most recently chief financial officer at Eat, will remain in the role, but assume additional responsibilities as MD, while the business continues to trade as a separate entity. In May it emerged that Pret A Manger would buy the business, which operates around 90 sites, and had longer-term plans to convert the brand’s shops to vegetarian Veggie Prets.Turnover at Eat had fallen from £99m in 2017 to just under £95m in 2018.Walker said he was “unbelievably proud” of his last three years leading Eat “through a significant period of change”.“Helped by the fantastic team from the ground up, we were able to turn around the business – evidenced by our last financial year, where we saw a significant improvement in our trading performance, sparking Pret’s interest,” said Walker.“Mike was a key part of this success, so I leave Eat in very capable hands. I now look forward to taking a much-needed break before considering my options in the future.”Rainer said he would be pleased to continue Walker’s work, steering the business through the next stage as it integrates with Pret.“The vast majority of our colleagues will be staying on at the combined group and our customers will continue to benefit from our creativity and drive for excellence.”last_img read more

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Join Us In The Fight For Net Neutrality! Find Out Why It Matters & How To Get Involved Here

first_imgOn December 14th, the Federal Communications Commission is expected to repeal the 2015 net neutrality rules, which prevent internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon from deciding what content gets to users fast, effectively allowing them to slow down or block specific sites or applications. The proposal to reverse these rules is expected to pass in a 3-to-2 vote along party lines, which would largely be viewed as a huge loss for consumers everywhere and a giant win for mega-corporations like AT&T and companies.In 2015, the net neutrality rules were passed under the premise that high-speed internet is an integral part of American life, and that services like Internet should be viewed as a utility, much like electricity and telephone. Thus, the net neutrality rules prohibit internet providers from “blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization—’fast lanes’ for sites that pay, and slow lanes for everyone else.”If the repeal is to pass, internet providers would be able to charge people more to access specific websites or online services as well as prioritize their own offerings over websites run by rival companies. Similarly, internet providers could charge fees to companies who can afford to pay to maintain the speed of their sites, essentially holding smaller websites hostage for payment or drastically slow their site speed in comparison. Perhaps most troublingly, ISPs could block sites outlying political opinions they disagree with.As music lovers and regular internet users, the idea of these rules being repealed is a scary thought. Please join us in the battle for net neutrality and the battle for freedom of speech, and reach out to your local congressmen to tell them to keep the Internet open and free. You can find out more about how to get involved at BattleForTheNet.com.[Photo: Greg Horowitz]last_img read more

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12 Days Of Phishmas 2018: It’s Today!

first_imgIt’s today! At long last, Phish will begin their four-night New Year’s Eve run at Madison Square Garden in New York City this evening. This year, we counted down the days til showtime with a very special Phishmas Advent calendar, revealing a little something sweet and Phishy once a day until the start of this year’s Garden party.As you get our pre-show checklists in order and get ready to head to Midtown, you can take a look back at all the Phishmas fun from the last 12 days below. See you there!On the first day of Phishmas… The Big Daddy ShowOn the second day of Phishmas… David Byrne Interviews PhishOn the third day of Phishmas… Trey Anastasio Talks Fare The Well At The New Yorker Festival On the fourth day of Phishmas… A Look Inside The Hoist Sessions From Cactus FilmsOn the fifth day of Phishmas… Mike Gordon Fascinates A Muscle Shoals LegendOn the sixth day of Phishmas… Page McConnell Chats in the Streets of LondonOn the seventh day of Phishmas… The Peanuts Conjure Cartoon Phish for “YEM” Dance PartyOn the eighth day of Phishmas… Trey & Mike Chat with MTV on H.O.R.D.E. Tour (Swig Beer, Cross Legs)On the ninth day of Phishmas… How Chris Kuroda & Phish’s Lighting Team Map out a SongOn the tenth day of Phishmas… Phish Does ITOn the eleventh day of Phishmas… The “Down With Disease” Music VideoOn the twelfth day of Phishmas… Why I Watch ‘Bittersweet Motel’ The Night Before A Runlast_img read more

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Intel’s Sadasivan Shankar named scientist in residence

first_img Read Full Story Materials design expert to spend fall semester at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied SciencesA leader in computational materials design will bring an industry perspective to the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) this year. Sadasivan Shankar will be the first Distinguished Scientist in Residence at the Institute for Applied Computational Science (IACS) at SEAS from August through December. Shankar will join the institute to teach a graduate-level fall course, Computational Design of Materials (AC 275). During his residence, he will also give invited lectures, advise students on their projects, and exchange ideas about in silico materials design with Harvard researchers.Established in 2010, IACS provides graduate training in applied computational science and organizes other activities to develop and sustain the community of Harvard faculty and students using computational approaches across all disciplines. This year, the first cohort of SEAS students begin a new Master of Science program in Computational Science and Engineering. Emphasizing the application of fundamental knowledge across the frontiers of natural and social sciences, the humanities, and engineering, the program prepares leaders for a future in which large-scale computation and advanced mathematical modeling will propel innovation and discovery in the 21st century.Shankar is Senior Principal Engineer and led materials design in the Design and Technology Group within the Intel Technology and Manufacturing Organization. He will spend the semester at SEAS under a sabbatical arrangement sponsored by Intel.last_img read more

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Professor receives $2 million grant to study clean energy production

first_imgIn accordance with “Laudato Si’,” the Pope’s encyclical on climate change this past year, Dr. Joan Brennecke, the Keating-Crawford Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, is working to develop technologies which will make energy production cleaner and recently received a $2 million grant from the United States Department of Energy to continue her work.Brennecke said her work focuses on ionic liquids.“Ionic liquids … are just salts that just have low melting points so that they’re pretty much liquid at room temperature,” she said. These liquids differ from normal salts in a major way, she said.“So these salts that we make are not just sodium and chloride, they have some organic content to them,” she said. “They still have a cation with a positive charge and an anion with a negative charge, and it’s just because they’re a little more complicated, have more atoms in there, that they have a lower melting point.” Brennecke said ionic liquids, which she has researched since 1998, have a combination of properties that define them as liquids that do not evaporate. This unique feature makes these liquids ideal for clean energy production, Brennecke said. “They’re a liquid but they can’t cause air pollution,” she said. These ionic liquids also help reduce pollution by limiting the amount of carbon dioxide released, she said. “If you have a gas fixture, that contains carbon dioxide. You can get the carbon dioxide that goes into the ionic liquid and leave the rest of the gas fixture behind,” she said. “Then I can take my ionic liquid over to another place and release the carbon dioxide.”While there is a huge potential for ionic liquids to help reduce climate change, there are properties of the liquids which pose problems, Brennecke said. “The problem is [ionic liquids] are kind of viscous, kind of gooey, so they’re more like mineral oil instead of water, a little bit gooier,” Brennecke said. “So what that means is that is that it’s hard to design them in a process when you’re trying to contact flue gas in liquid.”With the grant money she received from the Department of Energy, Brennecke said she is working to solve this problem.“This new project we’re working on is to encapsulate these ionic liquids in … little shells,” she said. “We want to see if we can improve the use of these ionic shells in a process.”The use of these ionic liquids has far-reaching potential, she said.“It is important for coal and natural gas power plants,” Brennecke said. “It’s the same … if you want to remove the carbon dioxide, this could be used for burning of any fuel source which has carbon dioxide in it, it could be biomass, it could be natural gas.”Brennecke said her work connects to the Catholic mission of the University. “So this all kind of fits in well with the Pope’s encyclical on climate change,” she said. “So we like to believe we’re advancing the Catholic mission.” Tags: Department of Energy, laudato si’last_img read more

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‘Show Some Skin’ looks to create dialogue, enhances production value

first_imgFor eight years running, “Show Some Skin” has challenged its audience to think about how race, gender, sexuality, class and other aspects of identity impacts the Notre Dame community.Each night from Wednesday through Saturday at 7 p.m. in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, “Show Some Skin” will once again challenge students, faculty and community members to think about these issues through the performance of around 20 personal, anonymous monologues written by Notre Dame students.This year, “Show Some Skin,” received 110 monologue submissions, a record number for the show. However, only around 20 to 25 of the submitted monologues will be performed, junior Peyton Davis, an associate produce for the show, said. In order to narrow the stories down, the story board, which is comprised of 12 individuals — including the faculty advisors, the producers, the directors and other student leaders for the show — sit down and read through all the monologues.“After reading all of them, we vote on each one while looking at a variety of criteria, including ‘How well does it fit our year’s theme and call for stories?’ and ‘What stories haven’t we heard before?’” Davis said. “That’s something that’s really important to us, because being a platform for vulnerability, we look for the stories that say something about the community that we haven’t heard before … We actually had our first pro-life monologue, so that was really special, because we got to see another perspective on an issue that at least, in some corners, becomes a little bit mystified, and it really makes for a better dialogue about such issues.”The cast tries to take the discussion beyond the stage by discussing the issues the monologues raise during rehearsals, as well as performing monologues in classes upon request.“It’s a movement towards dialogue,” Savanna Morgan, a junior and the technical director of the show, said. “So, come ready to engage and receive, and also expect that two to three hour discussion afterwards … What happens in the theatre doesn’t stay in the theatre. That’s the goal.”“They [students] can expect to be uncomfortable,” Trever Carter, a senior and the executive producer of the show, said. “I think that if people don’t leave uncomfortable, then we didn’t do our job. Especially for a pretty homogenous white, straight, Catholic campus, getting white, straight, Catholic people to deal with a lot of pretty ingrained biases or racism or anything like that is inherently uncomfortable … They can really expect to leave the show having engaged with Notre Dame as the truly diverse institution that it is, and our hope is that they take that and bring it into their everyday lives.”However, as so many monologues do end up not being performed in the actual show, for the first time, “Show Some Skin” will be creating an online publication of the extra monologues. The publication may also include monologues from previous years and videos of actor’s performances of the pieces.The number of submissions and an online publication are not the only unique aspects of this year’s show though. For the first time, Morgan said the show will also be incorporating lights and more technical aspects into the show.“This is the first year that we are focusing on the technical elements of ‘Show Some Skin,’” she said. “So I’ve been designing lights, sound and just the scenic design of the show. This is the first year that we have had both an artistic director and a technical director.”Dr. Cecilia Lucero, one of the show’s faculty advisors, said the staff are trying to balance the technical aspects of the show with the purpose of the monologues.“We also wanted to make sure that there was a balance, because really it’s about the monologue, and typically it’s been a pretty minimalist production so there usually hasn’t been any props on stage, except maybe a chair … the actors wear grey t-shirts and black pants,” Lucero said. “ … I think the technical pieces of it are going to highlight something about the piece that will heighten the emotional reaction, but it won’t take away from the story. It’s not going to be this spectacle.”While the increased production value hopes to contribute to the show’s power, Davis said it also presents a new challenge for the crew to overcome.“It’s a little ambitious and I think that everybody is really taking it in stride, and I think that it will, at the very least, challenge the team to make sure that it’s not just a theatre show; that it is just as intimate and vulnerable as it has been in past years,” he said.Echoing Davis’ comments, senior Joseph Blakely, the show’s director, said with these new additions come new production hurdles for the show.“Because we’re integrating a lot of new lighting and sound elements, there’s a lot of things that we’re figuring out for the very first time and it’s very exciting — it’s scary,” Blakey said.“I don’t want to call them growing pains, but I feel like that’s probably the most equitable,” he said. “Over the last few years … we have grown so much just as a super recognizable campus organization … We used to have a much smaller team, but one thing we did at the end of last year was that we decided to expand our team to handle some of these initiatives that we wanted to tackle this year … It’s people just getting used to new roles and a new division of responsibility. There’s a lot of moving parts.”Morgan said the new show’s new elements mark an important evolution in the show’s nature.“‘Show Some Skin’ is taking a new direction as far as what it looks, sounds, feels like — since it’s not just the same minimalistic students come on, read their monologues, leave the stage,” Morgan said. “There are more added layers of expression for the monologues and for me as the technical director — it’s keeping the true essence of the bareness without turning the show into too much of a spectacle, because we still appreciate the rawness that ‘Show Some Skin’ stands for.”This year, the show is focusing on that rawness and vulnerability with the theme “Drop the Wall,” Blakey said.“For us, it talks about … the masks people wear, the walls people put up between each other, even inside themselves,” Blakey said. “So we’re really talking about how do we drop the barriers that divide people, and how do we stop and just listen to one another and be vulnerable with one another.”Davis said what makes “Show Some Skin” is each monologue’s anonymity, which in turn opens attendees’ eyes to the universality of the problems individuals face.“I think that that kind of vulnerability is something that the rest of Notre Dame needs to see and it doesn’t always read for ordinary people to realize that these are just other Notre Dame students,” Davis said. ”That this story could be the story of your roommate, or your best friend, or the person you always see sitting alone in the dining hall or the person that you see who is always with friends in the dining hall. It could even be your professor that is writing this story. That’s really what we’re trying to get people to see.”Tags: debartolo performing arts center, show some skinlast_img read more

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Rain soaking cotton fields

first_imgThe deluge of rainfall this summer made a splash with some cotton farmers but created a tidal wave of challenges that some growers are still fighting.While the increased moisture sparked growth in some cotton plants, it stunted growth in other fields and made fields almost impossible for tractors and equipment to pass through.“There a lot of folks that are struggling to get in the field to get any work done. There’s some cotton that hasn’t been side dressed yet. We’re a little bit behind on that,” said Guy Collins, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist. “In places, there’s cotton that’s drowning. There’s a lot of water-logged cotton, not really taking off like we had hoped.”Unlike recent years when the cotton crop endured long periods of drought, it’s been common this year for fields around the state to get several days of rain. According to the UGA’s Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, the Bowen Farm on the UGA Tifton campus recorded 15.17 inches May 1-July 21. In comparison, the rainfall accumulated registered just 8.16 inches in 2012 and only 4.70 inches in 2011. During that same timeframe on the UGA campus in Griffin, 18.94 inches were recorded in 2013, 9.42 in 2012 and only 7.66 in 2011. “Right now, I’ve got cotton in the fourth week in bloom, and there’s some out there that’s very young,” Collins said. “You’ve kind of got a broad spectrum of crops and it ranges in terms of when they were planted.”Collins added that during this time of year cotton farmers, who plant early, are normally either irrigating, which hasn’t been necessary, or applying plant growth regulator treatments along with insect management. “That’s a challenge we’re running into. Farmers can’t (apply treatments) when they normally would so they’re a little bit behind schedule,” Collins said. For growers, the challenge may also be attributed to their particular field. For those who farm on low-lying fields, the problem is the ground doesn’t drain well. Water is left standing in the fields, which drowns the cotton. Farmers with fields that slope have to deal with washes, making it difficult for equipment to travel.More and more farmers have also resorted to hiring airplane pilots to apply chemicals or fertilizer on their cotton. It’s an added expense but one that’s probably “necessary,” for some growers, Collins said.Though farmers have encountered obstacles with the soggy conditions, Collins insists circumstances could be worse. “If we were in a drought, it would be a lot worse than what we have now,” he said. “However, a short-lived, slightly drier spell wouldn’t hurt us right now, but we don’t need rains to subside completely.”For more information about the UGA’s research on cotton, see www.ugacotton.com/.last_img read more

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Voice-Activated Tractors

first_imgVoice-activated tractors are the future of farming, according to University of Georgia agricultural engineer Glen Rains. Through research on the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences campus in Tifton, Georgia, and in partnership with Georgia Tech, Rains is researching voice-activated software that will cause tractors to stop in the event of an emergency. “Say a farmer had a heart attack or fell off of a tractor. With the voice activation, they could stop the tractor by using just their voice,” said Rains. He envisions the tractor stopping in the event of an emergency, notifying 911 and providing the farmer’s location, and alerting the farmer’s family. The innovation consists of a series of microphones that are mounted onto the tractor. Noise cancellation devices allow the farmer’s voice to be heard over the sounds of the tractor or other piece of farming equipment. The farmer must be within 10 meters – about 32 feet – of the microphone for it to detect his voice. “We just need to delve into more of the broader aspects – multiple types of tractors and voice types,” Rains said. “We need to test multiple algorithms for noise cancellation and voice recognition outside the tractor.” This is challenging because the microphone is trying to pick up the volume of a person’s voice over other noises, he said. Since all voices are different, the system must be trained to recognize each distinct voice. Rains is focusing on the mechanical parts of the device that control switching the tractor off and calling 911. His colleague, David Anderson, professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech, is working on the voice activation and noise cancellation aspects of the project. Rains is also receiving assistance from the AGCO Corporation, an agricultural equipment manufacturer headquartered in Duluth, Georgia. “When we build our first system, it will be put onto [an AGCO] tractor,” said Rains. Rains has been working on this project for almost three years and hopes it will be ready for commercial use in another three years. His inspiration for the device came from many years of training EMTs and firefighters how to extract people caught in farming equipment. After speaking to many spouses, friends and children of farmers who have been injured, Rains sees a great need for the device. “One of the scenarios I have heard repeatedly involves someone being grabbed by a piece of equipment and being isolated for a while before anyone knows they are caught in the equipment,” Rains said. “My objective is to develop something to keep that from happening.” Rains is also working with AGCO Corporation on a project that uses a tractor-mounted camera to take 3-D photos, complete with GPS location, in peanut fields in order to detect where diseases initially occur.Rains’ other farm equipment modifications include the UGA “Row-bot,” a computer-guided vehicle that checks the health of plants and fields, monitors cattle and sprays for insects. As co-director of the National AgrAbility Project in Georgia, he also modifies farm equipment for farmers with disabilities.(Kenzie Kesselring is an intern on the UGA Tifton Campus).last_img read more

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