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Last Week’s Most Read

first_img Last Week’s Most Read December 17, 2017 View post tag: Most Read News Back to overview,Home naval-today Last Week’s Most Read center_img Authorities Share this articlelast_img

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Carnival Bayou and Snug Harbor First Up for Dredging

first_imgBoats sit high and dry at low tide on Snug Harbor in Ocean City, NJ.City Council will vote Thursday (April 23) to advertise for bids from contractors who can dredge Ocean City’s shallow lagoons.The proposed specifications call for estimates on completing work at Carnival Bayou (the lagoon between 16th and 17th streets) and at Snug Harbor (the lagoon between Eighth Street and W. Revere Place near Ninth Street).The estimated dredging calls for the removal of 60,200 cubic yards of material, 44,200 from Carnival Bayou and 16,000 from Snug Harbor.The work would mark the continuation of dredging for the first time since 2012, when all work stopped as the only approved disposal site was filled to capacity.The city approved a $2.7 million contract for a company to haul material away from that site. Up to 50,000 cubic yards from the new dredging could be deposited there.A new site near the Route 52 causeway could accommodate 7,000 cubic yards.The bid specifications ask for contractors to provide an alternate price for removing material from the Route 52 site to make more room.Thursday’s meeting is open to the public and starts at 7 p.m. on the third floor of City Hall.last_img read more

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American Legion 524 Celebrates Grand Opening of New Headquarters

first_imgAmerican Legion Post 524 members Jim Sambucci, past Commander Bill Cruice and Post Commander Bob Marzulli cut the ribbon during a ceremony in 2018 to celebrate the grand opening of their new building. By Maddy VitaleBill Cruice was commander of American Legion Morvay-Miley Post 524 in 2000, when he organized a drive for the veterans to have a meeting place, one where they could share their memories, enjoy camaraderie and hold events.On Saturday, the 84-year-old reflected on how he and other post members, there were 30 at the time, knocked on doors and began the long journey to having their own building. The post, which grew to 450 members in 17 years, leased space in four different locations. Dignitaries, members of the public and veterans listen as Post Commander Bob Marzulli speaks.Now, Post 524 finally has its own space to call home.“I never thought this day would come – I never thought I would live to see it,” Cruice, an Airforce veteran said, looking at the crowd of dignitaries, members of the public and fellow veterans, during a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new headquarters for Post 524 at 46th street and West Avenue.Commander Bob Marzulli led the ceremony, which included raising the flags and the official ribbon cutting. Post Commander Bob Marzulli with Senator Jeff Van Drew.Several dignitaries attended the event including, Senator Jeff Van Drew, D-Cape, Cumberland, Atlantic. Cape May County Freeholder Director Gerald Thornton, Freeholder Jeff Pierson, Freeholder E. Marie Hayes, Ocean City Mayor Jay Gillian, City Council President Peter Madden, Councilman Bob Barr, Councilwoman Karen Bergman, Councilman Keith Hartzell and Ocean City Executive Director of the Regional Chamber of Commerce Michele Gillian.Senator Jeff Van Drew, Mayor Jay Gillian, Councilwoman Karen Bergman, Councilmen Keith Hartzell and Bob Barr and Freeholder E. Marie Hayes and Freeholder Director Gerald Thornton, along with post members during the Pledge of Allegiance.Officials spoke of their appreciation for the veterans. “You really made a difference. It is one thing to get up every day and say you are going to do something, it is another to do it,” Van Drew said of the members’ efforts to build a headquarters. “You did it and you make a difference. God bless you.”Wiping away tears, Hartzell gave a heartfelt tribute to his late father, who served both in  World War II and the Korean War, as well as other vets. “I love all of you,” Hartzell said.“As a 40-year member of the American Legion this is one of my proudest moments,” Thornton said, adding that not only was it the opening of Post 524, but the 100th anniversary of the American Legion.For many years, the new building with 4,800 square feet, seemed like an impossible dream. In 2014 the City gave the Legion the property to lease for $1 a year for 50 years. The mayor told the crowd that he was appreciative of the dedication of the veterans and that the city and Post 524 work very well together. Ocean City Mayor Jay Gillian addresses the American Legion.The American Legion operated out of a building on 33rd Street and Bay Avenue. But like the buildings before it, Post 524 needed a larger space. Members held an array of fundraisers to rally the community’s financial support for the project. In total, the building exceeded $500,000. “After six years of trying to put this together, it was accomplished, and we did it always with the motto of veterans helping veterans and giving back to the community,” said Chairman of the Legion’s Fundraising Committee Rob Cozen. “This is our greatest achievement outside of the veterans’ programs and helping the community,” Post Adjutant Jack Hagen noted. “This building exists for that one reason.”The American Legion Post 524 has a new home at 46th Street and West Avenue.last_img read more

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Weedie Braimah Assembles World Class Lineup For Tribute To West African & Cuban Music

first_imgOn March 7, 2018, Weedie Braimah & Friends will bring a very special engagement to the world-famous Blue Note in New York City. Braimah, born in Ghana and raised in East St. Louis, has raised the bar for percussion in the U.S. in recent years. His talents have brought him to stages all over the world, performing and touring with the likes of Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Christian Scott, Oteil Burbridge, Bokanté, Toubab Krewe, The Nth Power, and many more.Weedie’s passion first and foremost is for the music of West Africa, Cuba, and the larger African Diaspora. He put this passion on display as his solo project ‘Weedie Braimah & The Hands of Time’ debuted in New Orleans during JazzFest 2017, and again when him and Luke Quaranta brought together a diverse group of artists under the moniker ‘Future Folklore’ at the Brooklyn Bowl for Brooklyn Comes Alive in September.It is in this spirit that he has assembled the group of artists to perform with him at the Blue Note on March 7. Joining Weedie will be Jazz trumpeter and New Orleans native Christian Scott, Cuban congero Pedrito Martinez, bass virtuoso Dywane ‘Mono Neon’ Thomas Jr., Toubab Krewe founder Luke Quaranta, guitarist and djeli ngoni player Sam Dickey, kora master Yacouba Sissoko, Malian singer Abdoulaye Diabate, and multi-instrumentalist Munir Zakee.Asked about the show Weedie said, “I’m extremely honored to be at a place that I have only dreamed of being! It’s a true joy to be alongside these amazingly talented artists whom I look up to and admire on and off the stage. These fellow musicians are part of my family. They represent true folklore in its purest form. The Blue Note is in store for an awakening of Africa and the Diaspora. The Djembé will talk!!!!”Tickets for the show are available here.last_img read more

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The Disco Biscuits’ Jon “The Barber” Gutwillig Adds Rare Solo Acoustic Show In Denver

first_imgThis weekend, The Disco Biscuits will head back to Colorado for their annual Bisco Inferno run. The Philadelphia-born jamtronica heavyweights will perform a three-night run at Denver’s Ogden Theatre starting tomorrow, on May 24th, through to May 26th. These Ogden shows will serve as a warm-up for the band’s headlining performance at the iconic Red Rocks Amphitheatre on Sunday, May 27th, where they’ll be joined by two of the most exciting “next-gen” bands in the jam scene: the Arizona-based up-and-comers of Spafford and Los Angeles’jazz-funk trio Organ Freeman.However, today, Disco Biscuits guitarist Jon “The Barber” Gutwillig has announced that he will perform an additional show on Monday, May 28th, at Denver’s intimate Globe Hall. Billed as a solo acoustic show, the show will see Barber in a rare context, which if past performances are any indication, will serve as “storytime” in addition to a musical performance. The last time that Barber offered up a solo acoustic show during the Biscuits’ Bisco Inferno run was eight years ago, when the guitarist performed at Boulder’s Fox Theatre on May 30th, 2010. Tickets for Barber’s rare solo acoustic performance at Denver’s Globe Hall on Monday, May 28th, to close out the upcoming Bisco Inferno run are on sale now via Ticketfly.In addition to this Denver show, Barber also has a solo acoustic show scheduled during Disc Jam Music Festival, which runs from June 7th through 10th in Stephentown, New York. Disc Jam’s lineup also includes performances from Electron, a supergroup composed of Barber’s bandmates Marc Brownstein and Aron Magner in addition to Tom Hamilton (Ghost Light, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead) and Mike Greenfield (Lotus), plus sets from Lotus, Beats Antique, Galactic, The Motet, and many more.last_img read more

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Falconer To Hold Special Meeting Discussing Second Annexation Attempt

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by Justin Gould/WNYNewsNow.FALCONER – The Village of Falconer plans to hold a special meeting later this month to discuss Jamestown’s second annexation attempt.Village officials say the Mayor and Board of Trustees will meet on Monday, March 23 at 7 p.m. in the board room of the village community building.At the meeting, officials are scheduled to vote on the annexation of the Dow Street Sub-Station property.Last week, Jamestown’s City Council voted to move forward with legal action to annex the property. City officials say the proposed annexation would save the Jamestown BPU approximately $173,000 in property tax payments to the Town of Ellicott, Village of Falconer and School District annually.The substation sits on property in the Town of Ellicott and the Village of Falconer on Dow Street between Tiffany Avenue and south of East Second Street.A previous attempt to annex failed after Rochester’s Supreme Court Fourth Department Appellate Division denied the City of Jamestown’s petition to annex.Additionally, officials say the March abstracts will also be submitted for approval of payments.last_img read more

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Just in case

first_imgThe U.S. food and water supply could become targets of terrorism,and scientists in Georgia are preparing for such attacks. Center formedShortly after the events of 9/11, University of Georgiaresearchers teamed up with state officials to form anagroterrorism task force. The Georgia Emergency ManagementAssociation, Georgia Agribusiness Council and Georgia Departmentof Agriculture are partners. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of Georgia Later, a joint venture between Georgia Tech Research Instituteand University of Georgia led to establishing CSAGE, the Centerfor Security of Agriculture and the Environment. “The focus of CSAGE research is to counteract the intentional useof pathogens and chemicals to create terror,” said Jeff Fisher,co-director of CSAGE.”Areas which could be targeted include areas where animals andfood are produced and distributed, fields, water supplies and theatmosphere,” said Fisher, a professor of environmental health atthe UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Not just farmers’ problemThe threat of agroterrorism isn’t a problem just for farmers. “If a disease was introduced into our animal populations, plantcrops or food supply, the value of agriculture would plummet,”Fisher said. “Our trading partners would refuse to buy from us,and the U.S. would head into a deep recession.” Introducing foreign animal diseases like foot-and-mouth diseasecould decimate the nation’s livestock industry. And farmerswouldn’t suffer alone, Fisher said. Every American would feel thepinch.”We could lose up to $100 billion from our national economy fromfoot-and-mouth alone,” he said. “Avian influenza or Newcastledisease, two devastating poultry diseases, would cripple thenation’s poultry industry.”This would be a huge blow to Georgia, which many consider thepoultry capital of the nation.Georgia farmers constantly fight diseases and pests that pop upaccidentally. Intentional introductions could have “a significantand long-lasting impact on agriculture in Georgia,” he said.Researchers at Georgia Tech are working to develop sensors thatcan detect and characterize contaminants in the food chain. “Thissensor technology could be used for field detection, warning forfood processing and laboratory analysis,” Fisher said.Models will assess risksUGA scientists are working on mathematical models to help assessthe risks that attacks could pose to crops, animals and humans.The success of these projects lies in awareness and education.”The extension service at UGA will be used to disseminateagroterror information and educate agriculture personnel acrossthe state,” Fisher said. “Overall, the CSAGE plans to cover thegamut of activities involved in countering agriculturalterrorism.” The group would like to present a mock agroterroristic scenariofor FBI agents, GEMA officials and others to prepare for actualemergencies. But the group needs funding.Fisher has applied for and hopes to get funding for the center through the president’s homeland security program, he said.last_img read more

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Colombia Launches Offensive Against Illegal Mining in Eight Departments

first_img Guerrillas extort local miners throughout Colombia “This type of intervention is a necessity because the machinery used in this way is causing enormous damage to the country. We are not launching an offensive against mining in general and much less against artisanal mining. This is an operation against illegal groups,” Santos told reporters. Gold, coltan and tungsten are among the minerals mined illegally in 25 of Colombia’s 32 departments, representing a new and lucrative source of income even as coca cultivation falls, authorities say. And while the practice is nothing new here, observers say the extent to which it has spread and the magnitude of its economic yield is causing a stir — leading President Juan Manuel Santos to launch an offensive against such activity in eight departments. By Dialogo June 19, 2013 The guerrillas and other armed groups charge miners an entry fee of up to five million pesos ($2,650) for one piece of heavy machinery and then a monthly charge of two million pesos ($1,060) to continue working. Pinzón conceded that it won’t be easy to crack down on such practices, given the difficulties in reaching remote locations where the state presence is slim and where illegal groups are active in mining. He said the illegal mines are also displacing civilians living nearby — not to mention causing grave environmental damage. In mid-June, 67 pieces of heavy mining machinery allegedly belonging to the FARC were seized in the northern department of Córdoba, while in the jungle regions of Guainía and Vaupés, authorities confiscated 32 tons of coltan — a dull black metallic ore dredged from nearby rivers. Soon after the president’s statements, the Medellín newspaper El Colombiano published images of Colombian Air Force aircraft attacking and destroying machines used to excavate land in the department of Antioquia. center_img “Illegal mining not only affect the environment and damages Colombia’s natural resources but at the same time generates an economy to launder cash or finance terrorist activities. We cannot permit these actions to continue, and for this reason we must fully combat this illegal activity,” Pinzón said. Illegal gold mining is prevalent in about 340 of Colombia’s 1,102 municipalities, said Colombian Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) is present in 87 of those 340, the National Liberation Army (ELN) in 30, and other criminal gangs in another 118, Pinzón told reporters. BOGOTÁ — Illegal mining in Colombia is reportedly overtaking coca as the principal source of income for FARC guerrillas and newly formed armed groups known as “bandas emergentes” — especially in regions of the country where precious metals and minerals are found and the state presence is thin. More than 2,000 pieces of heavy machinery are being used for mining in the departments of Bolívar, Córdoba and Cauca as well as in national parks and other protected areas, said Gen. Leonardo Pinto of the Colombian Army’s Nudo del Paramillo task force. In Norosi, the town in Bolívar department where in January ELN rebels kidnapped a Canadian engineer working with the mining firm Geo Explorer, armed groups supposedly charge a 50 percent tax on any minerals extracted from the ground. In Peru something similar is happening, immense extensions of wooded rain forest have been deforested due to mining. Gold provides wealth but also debases.last_img read more

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CUNA thanks senators for recognizing importance of financial literacy

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr CUNA sent a letter of thanks to Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.) for leading a Senate resolution designating April as Financial Literacy Month.Nearly 30 senators lent their name to Senate Resolution 427, which aims to raise public awareness about the importance of personal financial education in the United States.“Credit unions invest heavily in financial education, and have conducted thousands of educational sessions, from educating students in the classroom to adults at the local credit union branch,” wrote CUNA President/CEO Jim Nussle. “Many credit unions have one or more certified financial counselors on staff, and credit unions have provided millions of Americans with formal and informal financial counseling.”He also cited the extensive work of the National Credit Union Foundation and how its efforts compliment and reinforce credit unions’ work to expand and enhance financial literacy for millions of American families. continue reading »last_img read more

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NAFCU closely monitoring coronavirus

first_img continue reading » The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) earlier this week provided an update on the spread of the coronavirus also being referred to as COVID-19, as new cases were confirmed in Italy, Iran and South Korea. NAFCU is closely monitoring the situation on a daily basis and encourages its members and stakeholders to follow government updates to stay informed of the newest developments and guidance.In total, the United States is tracking 60 confirmed cases; no deaths have been reported. Per a briefing from Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, the U.S. cases include: 42 former passengers on the Diamond Princess cruise ship; 3 Americans recently repatriated from Wuhan, China, the epicenter of the outbreak; 14 patients had either recently been to China or are a spouse of someone who recently returned from China; and one contracted the illness through unknown means and is currently being treated at UC Davis Medical Center.NAFCU conferences are currently still planned to go on in the coming months; however, NAFCU staff will notify members and conference attendees should anything change. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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