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Oxford Care Services face spending cuts

first_imgBritain’s largest public sector union has alleged that over 300 NHS workers providing support for those with learning difficulties face being sacked by their employer TQtwentyone, unless they agree to changes in pay and working conditions.Unison have stated that the workers they represent face pay cuts of up to £3500 from their annual salary, and their holidays being shortened by eight days a year. The union say that workers in Oxfordshire, as well as Dorset, Wiltshire and Hampshire, will be affected.TQtwentyone, which provides care services for people with learning difficulties, rejected Unison’s criticism. A spokesperson told Cherwell, “A number of claims made by the union are incorrect and misleading. TQtwentyone has an excellent record of providing social care for a number of years. Our priority is to continue to exist to provide that care and support to people.”They continued, “To be able to operate our income needs to match our costs – at the moment it doesn’t. We are trying to protect the jobs of our valued staff. Our support services are not funded by health budgets through the NHS; they are mostly commissioned by local authority social services departments.”TQtwentyone rejected the accusation they are “sacking people”. The spokesperson stated that staff affected will not see changes for over a year, and will keep the same NHS pensions, bank holiday enhancements, and travel benefits. TQtwentyone said, “Staff have been fully supported through this unsettling period of change and we have continued to try to work with the unions over these changes.” Dan Turner, Publicity Officer of Oxford University Labour Club, argued, “Cuts like these make an absolute mockery of the Government’s claim that their efforts to tackle public sector spending are fair or effective. It’s clear that the pressures exerted by three years of austerity have already had a demoralising effect on staff, and the inevitable result of further attacks on workers’ positions is that standards will continue to slip.”He continued, “Perhaps the biggest insult is that this attack comes in the wake of a costly and unnecessary reorganisation of the NHS that has already cost millions, which could have preserved jobs and standards.”However, one Oxford student opined, “I think it’s really difficult. Obviously it’s not fair for the staff to have their pay cut but if the cuts are really that necessary to make sure they can still supply their services then I can understand that. Hopefully they can come to some sort of compromise.”Unison was unavailable for comment.last_img read more

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I&M crews helping restore power in storm ravaged West Virginia

first_img (Photo supplied/Indiana Michigan Power) While the state of Indiana tries to dig out of nearly a foot of snow, people who live in Kentucky and West Virginia are dealing with snow and ice.Crews from Indiana Michigan Power traveled to West Virginia last week, when ice and freezing rain knocked out power for many people. Monday night, when this latest storm rolled through, they dealt with issues themselves.“We’re actually in the dark,” said Doug DeBest, I&M Safety and Health Manager. “Shortly after getting back to the hotel, we lost power here.”DeBest and his team are back to work today though.“All of our bucket trucks and line trucks have chains on them now, and we’re trying to gain access up into the hills of West Virginia to get the power restored to the people up there,” DeBest said. WhatsApp I&M crews helping restore power in storm ravaged West Virginia Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Previous articleLongtime racing announcer Bob Jenkins diagnosed with brain cancerNext articleMore tips on how to avoid a heart attack while shoveling snow Network Indiana By Network Indiana – February 17, 2021 0 222 Google+ Pinterest Facebook IndianaLocalMichiganNews Pinterest Google+ Twitterlast_img read more

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Braun: “Small print” in COVID relief bill could have big tax consequences

first_imgIndianaLocalNews Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Facebook By Jon Zimney – March 17, 2021 1 197 Twitter Pinterest (provided by his Senate office) A provision regarding state taxes in the COVID relief package passed by Congress earlier this month has caught the eye of one of your senators in Washington.Sen. Mike Braun (R-IN) is referring to a provision written by Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) that puts essentially attaches a string to the nearly $350 billion in federal relief that all 50 states, as well as U.S. territories, will be splitting up among them.“There was a small fine print. My team caught it,” Braun said to Fox Business. “(It says) that you cannot use that money if you lower taxes in your state. That shows you how far the Democrats will go to put that type of restriction on good business climate states, like Indiana.”More specifically, the provision states that a state cannot accept federal relief money from the American Rescue Plan Act in order to offset losses in revenue, either directly or indirectly, from tax cuts passed by that state’s legislature. That essentially bans states on taking any legislative action to lower taxes until 2024.“The Joe Manchin amendment says you can’t do it,” said Braun. “It’s probably unconstitutional. That’s one of many things you get when you look at a bill full of many things that you don’t need.”Many other critics of the provision say that it violates the Tenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Braun has introduced a bill in the Senate that would repeal this provision. Previous articleHealth leaders working overtime to keep the community safe during March MadnessNext articleIndiana BMV adding five new language options to drivers exam Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Twitter Braun: “Small print” in COVID relief bill could have big tax consequences Google+ Pinterest WhatsApplast_img read more

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The Claypool Lennon Delirium Announces Second Album, Shares New Single, Reveals NYE Plans

first_imgToday, after much anticipation, The Claypool Lennon Delirium has announced their second album together: South of Reality, due out February 22 via ATO. South of Reality is the follow-up to 2016’s Monolith of Phobos, the band’s debut record that displayed their fascinatingly raw authenticity, and 2017’s Lime And Limpid Green EP, which featured psychedelic covers of Pink Floyd, The Who, King Crimson, and Flower Travellin’ Band. Along with this exciting announcement, The Claypool Lennon Delirium have shared the album’s first single: an epic, 6-minute and 30-second composition: Blood And Rockets: Movement I, Saga of Jack Parsons – Movement II, Too The Moon.The Claypool Lennon Delirium – “Blood And Rockets: Movement I, Saga of Jack Parsons – Movement II, Too The Moon”<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>As the band’s website describes the sophomore album, it “might be just the antidote this sick world needs. Music so potent it could repel an asteroid impact from space. These seasoned warriors of psychedelia have crafted timeless songs that may as well be chiseled in stone.”In addition to the new album’s announcement, the band also announced a series of shows to celebrate the new year. The Claypool Lennon Delirium will ring in the new year at The Fillmore in San Francisco, CA on December 31st. Before New Year’s Eve, they’ll play at The Observatory in San Diego on December 28th and The Observatory in Santa Ana on December 29th. Tickets and VIP packages are available for pre-order on Thursday, Oct. 25th, and general on sale Friday, Oct 26th. On top of that, this morning, The Claypool Lennon Delirium were included on SweetWater 420‘s initial lineup announcement for April of 2019.The Claypool Lennon Delirium first emerged in 2015 as one of the year’s most exciting new bands. The seemingly unlikely duo of Primus bassist Les Claypool and Beatles offspring/Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger leader Sean Lennon came together with this psychedelic collaboration. Their relationship blossomed when the two spent more time together over a holiday break, “drinking vino, hunting mushrooms and throwing musical pasta at the walls” at Claypool’s Rancho Relaxo. The fun times eventually morphed into the release of an album and a lengthy tour full of summer festival appearances.Now, three years later, the band is still grinding out tunes and refining their sound into one of the most interesting of this decade. With a new album on the way, and Primus taking a “cool-out” from the road for “a bit,” we can expect that The Claypool Lennon Delirium will announce a lengthy 2019 tour sometime soon. To stay up to date on The Claypool Lennon Delirium, follow their official website.last_img read more

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Robert Kirshner receives the James Craig Watson Medal

first_img Read Full Story Robert Kirshner of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics has received the James Craig Watson Medal of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for his lifetime scientific achievements in astronomy. The NAS will present his medal at a ceremony at the Academy’s annual meeting on April 27, 2014.Kirshner is among 15 individuals honored by the NAS this year for their extraordinary scientific achievements in the physical, biological, and social sciences.The citation recognizes Kirshner for “his contribution to our understanding of both supernovae and the structure and evolution of the universe. His work with students using supernova light curves as calibrated standard candles has provided evidence for an accelerating expansion of the universe. The dark energy inferred from this result is one of the deepest mysteries of modern science.”Kirshner was a member of the High-z Supernova Search Team that used observations of extragalactic supernovae to discover the accelerating universe. This universal acceleration implies the existence of dark energy and was named the top science breakthrough of 1998 by Science magazine. For this work he was jointly awarded the Gruber Cosmology Prize in 2007.Kirshner is Clowes Professor of Science at Harvard University and author of “The Extravagant Universe: Exploding Stars, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Cosmos.” A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1998 and the American Philosophical Society in 2004. He served as president of the American Astronomical Society from 2003 to 2005. He was given the Distinguished Alumni Award by Caltech in 2004.last_img read more

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Audubon Day Camp Set For Next Week

first_imgSubmitted image.JAMESTOWN — With no school on Wednesday, November 11, it is a perfect time for kids to be outdoors getting some fresh air and exercise. That is why Audubon Community Nature Center (ACNC) is offering a special November Camp from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. that day.Children 4 to 12 years-old can join nature educators and friends for a school holiday and come to Audubon for exploration, fun, and learning.The children can enjoy a day of camp as the seasons shift from autumn to winter. They can explore habitats, play outside, investigate what happens as winter starts to take hold, and visit with their friends.Much of the day is spent outdoors, so children need to dress for the weather and bring two sets of extra clothes, including socks, shoes, and mittens/gloves. They also need a snack, lunch, a water bottle, and a face covering. Cost for the camp is $40 for ages 4-12 or $30 for Nature Center member children. Additional siblings receive a $5 discount.Enrollment is limited. Paid reservations are required by Monday, November 9. For more information and to register, call (716) 569-2345 during business hours or click on “Register for Upcoming Programs” at AudubonCNC.org.Audubon’s COVID-19 safety precautions require face coverings for all visitors ages 3 and up for indoor programs. Face coverings are also required outdoors when visitors cannot maintain six feet of distance between family groups. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Vermont Chamber Hospitality Council announces 2009 award winners

first_imgThe Vermont Hospitality Council, the tourism division of the Vermont Chamber of Commerce, is pleased to announce the winners of the five highly anticipated Vermont Hospitality Awards.  This year’s recipients are:Borden E. Avery Innkeeper of the Year: Bud McLaughlin & Bill Wolfe, Holiday Inn, Rutland. This award is the Vermont hospitality industry’s most prestigious award, designed for individuals who have held long time, high profile positions in the state’s tourism industry. McLaughlin and Wolfe, Vermont Chamber members for 36 years, remain extremely hands-on in the day-to-day management of their Holiday Inn and maintain a strong commitment to further educate and train their staff members. B&B Innkeeper of the Year: John Perkins & Jay Kerch, The Phineas Swann B&B Inn, Montgomery Center. This award is designed for individuals who continue to demonstrate excellence in the operation and management of a smaller Vermont bed & breakfast or inn. In the past 4 years, Perkins and Kerch have reinvented The Phineas Swann to become a thriving year-round destination choice for travelers to Vermont.Chef of the Year: Chef Gerry Nooney, Sugarbush Resort & Timbers Restaurant, Waitsfield. This award is designed for an individual with a proven history of supporting Vermont’s agricultural economy through the use of local food and products.  The Chef of the Year also donates time or services to the community at large through the operation and management of a restaurant in Vermont. Chef Nooney continues to prove his support for the state of Vermont by his commitment to creating new recipes using local food and products. He has touched many Vermonters and visitors with his broad, innovative culinary marketing partnerships.Restaurateur of the Year: Suzanne Johnson, Tilley’s Café, Burlington. This award is designed for an individual who continues to demonstrate excellence in the operation and management of a restaurant in Vermont. A marketing expert and innovative entrepreneur, Johnson contributes to the community and supports her staff in improving their service and knowledge. Tilley’s Café is Vermont’s first green restaurant and Vermont’s only restaurant with valet service.Allied Member of the Year: Rochelle Skinner, Vermont Department of Forests, Parks, & Recreation. This award is designed for an individual who goes above and beyond in offering a service that supports the hospitality industry in Vermont. Skinner’s exceptional knowledge and involvement in Vermont’s outdoor recreation industry is an inspiration to park rangers, staff and volunteers whom together champion Vermont’s unparalleled natural resources. The recipients of these awards will be honored at the Vermont Chamber Hospitality Gala, scheduled for Wednesday, September 16 from 5:30 – 10 pm at The Essex, Vermont’s Culinary Resort & Spa.The Vermont Chamber of Commerce, the largest state-wide private, not-for-profit business organization represents nearly every sector of the state’s corporate/hospitality community. Our mission is to create an economic climate conducive to business growth and the preservation of the Vermont quality of life. Source: Vermont Chamber of Commercelast_img read more

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Ecuadorean Jailed for Organizing Deadly Migrant Trip

first_img A human trafficking suspect was sentenced to 12 years in prison for sending a group of Ecuadorean citizens to Mexico on a trip that ended with four of them killed in a massacre, authorities said on October 17. Jose Vasquez, who was arrested in August in southwestern Ecuador, was also fined US$8,760 by a court, Canara province prosecutor Romeo Garate told reporters. Vasquez, an Ecuadorean national, was identified as the organizer of the fateful trip by one of the survivors of the August 23, 2010, massacre in the northeastern Mexican state of Tamaulipas, which left a total of 72 Latin American migrants dead. Mexican authorities say the killing was committed by the powerful Los Zetas drug cartel because the migrants refused to join the gang. An estimated 140,000 Latin American citizens cross Mexico every year in the hope of reaching the United States, a perilous journey filled with thefts, kidnappings and murders. By Dialogo October 19, 2012last_img read more

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Is Bellone’s Bid for a Drinking Water Tax Proposal a Ploy to Promote Development?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York From the crowded podium at an outdoor press conference in Yaphank last month, backed by a supportive chorus of environmentalists, bureaucrats, civic leaders and elected officials, Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone announced his method of corralling his public water enemy No. one: nitrogen.The answer? A small, modest fee on water usage, which according to Newsday, would require “state legislation to allow voters to decide whether they want to create a water quality protection fee of $1 per 1,000 gallons of water used.”With an estimated annual revenue of nearly $75 million, the new money stream would funnel into a “Water Quality Improvement Fund” with the sole purpose of paying for wastewater improvements, including hooking residences and other assorted areas to sewer plants as well as giving homeowners the opportunity to get septic system upgrades.Creating new taxes for the sake of water protection is a sound idea, and it has ample policy precedent, for such a model has been used before to help fund open space acquisitions for decades. Further, according to Bellone’s statement, it has been employed in Spokane, Wash., which similarly relies on a sole source aquifer for drinking water.Despite these positive factors, the motives of the administration behind these actions aren’t sincere. In the end, the proposed new water fee isn’t as much about protecting the environment as it is to create more development opportunities for the real estate industry. The solutions offered by the county’s water protection plan aren’t substantive enough. Essentially, the document’s main approach to water protection focuses on sewers, and their relative effectiveness in achieving nitrogen reduction—a faulty foundation on which to build environmental policy thanks to the limited effectiveness these facilities have had on Long Island.Regardless of the intentions behind imposing the fee, the call for a referendum on the issue is a brilliant political move. At the ballot box, time and time again Long Islanders have overwhelmingly supported environmental issues related to water protection, so the measure is likely to pass easily. What is most concerning, though, is that many voters who may give their approval won’t realize the ramifications.Newsday’s Editorial Board, typically gung-ho for such environmental actions, wrote a cautious April 29 editorial that called for additional analysis of the proposal, saying that “the plan lacks details.” They advocated for slowing down what they saw as a rushed process. The editorial board was right, but they didn’t go far enough. The reason why the process is being sped up is because the county executive is eager to put shovels in the ground. The paper should have dug deeper into the linkage between the supposed environmental actions of the administration, and Bellone’s strong desire to build, build, build.The true ideological roots of this new fee can be traced back to the latest iteration of Suffolk County’s Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan. Buried within that document in Section 8, the plan tellingly calls for ways to “stimulate development in order to promote economic growth and stability.”This bureaucratic code translates into the creation of sewers, which, in turn, allows for more developmental density. Advocates for downtown Smithtown and Kings Park are already chomping at the bit for wastewater treatment, having wanted sewer linkages for decades to jumpstart their lagging economic development efforts.Curbing the nitrogen issue is one thing, but looking to ramp up developmental efforts at the same time is disingenuous. Simply put, jumpstarting LI’s anemic economy shouldn’t be the burden of environmental policy. They should be mutually exclusive efforts with interconnected goals. Economic development can be achieved without adversely impacting the environment, but the Island’s elected officials just haven’t achieved the right balance to achieve it yet.The bigger issue, however, is can we trust the county with this additional $75 million flowing into its coffers every year? The notion of taxing the water we drink is like taxing the air we breathe in the view of veteran policymakers like Paul Sabatino, a former deputy county executive who previously sued the county over misappropriation of the existing quarter-cent sales tax that already funds Suffolks’s Drinking Water Protection Program. Given recent legal happenings with the county’s clean water fund, residents have the right to be suspicious about Suffolk using the fee for the purpose it is intended. For all intents and purposes, Bellone has not earned that trust back just yet.Karl Grossman, a veteran award-winning investigative reporter, is also concerned about how much of the water fee is tied to the county’s push for sewers.“Bellone has been promoting sewering in Suffolk County largely for economic development reasons,” Grossman recently told me. “He feels sewers would be a huge incentive in encouraging development and financial stimulation that he sees coming as a result. Thus, questions have been raised over how much of the sewer push is being made under the guise of environmental protection and also about the impacts of widespread new sewering.”Grossman argued that existing limitations on growth will likely disappear with additional sewering, much to the delight of the development community. As Grossman put it to me, this is “something the bulldozer boys who have ravaged and paved over so much of western Long Island and now have their eyes on its east and areas of moderate growth in western Suffolk would love to see.”In fairness to the Bellone administration, LI does have a serious nitrogen problem in its ground and surface waters. As evidenced by the almost annual algae blooms and fish kills, it has gotten worse. At least the county executive is trying to take tangible action to reverse the decline. Run-off from Suffolk’s mostly outdated 360,000 cesspools and septic systems does pollute our water quality, but connecting these properties to sewage treatment should be separate from efforts to develop unsewered downtowns and parcels.“The good element about the plan,” observed Grossman, “is that it, in part, pays attention to advanced wastewater treatment systems—systems for single homes and communities that utilize new technology now used in areas all over the US in removing nitrogen from wastewater. With nitrogen being the key cause of brown tides, red tides and the deterioration of our waters, these new systems would be ideal for Suffolk County.”In the press release announcing the proposal, development-friendly groups offered their support alongside local environmental groups. In the developer cohort, Desmond Ryan of the Association for a Better Long Island, a pro-business lobbying group, said the fee is all about reconciling growth and water quality, saying that  “striking that balance between environmental protection and comprehensive economic development will only assist in making Suffolk County a great place to do business.”To Grossman, this sewer talk is déjà vu all over again.“As a reporter, I covered the Southwest Sewer District project of the 1970s—pushed by construction, engineering and development interests—and it also was claimed to be needed for environmental reasons,” he said. “It became a $1 billion scandal.”And, he pointed out, that staggering sum represented the value of the dollar back then. Tellingly, the federal government paid 80 percent of the cost, a totally unlikely prospect today.Bellone’s proposal would be a decent solution if his administration had pure intentions—and if the public could trust that the funding would be spent as promised. If the referendum is eventually approved, the fee would take effect in 2018.Ideally, the $75 million in annual revenue should only be allocated to help homeowners in decidedly residential, single-family subdivisions convert their existing systems to sewers. But if the water fee doesn’t win the public’s affection, perhaps with the cheap debt available in today’s market, the county should consider just bonding the expected $9 billion it would take to construct the needed sewers.But the current proposal is purposely vague about what limitations it might impose on the fee’s uses. What’s to prevent it from quickly becoming a slush fund for the politically connected, and in the long run, help contribute to the further decline of Long Island’s drinking and surface waters by overdevelopment? Nobody wants that, at least officially. But in Suffolk these days, it seems that the desire to conduct business is trumping doing what’s needed to protect our threatened aquifer.Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco is a regular contributor to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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Arsenal target Gabriel Magalhaes keen on move to the Premier League

first_img Metro Sport ReporterThursday 25 Jun 2020 12:07 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link4.8kShares Mikel Arteta has plenty of defensive issues to contend with (Picture: Getty Images)‘Gennaro Gattuso [Napoli’s manager] likes me a lot? I don’t know, we haven’t talked. ‘On the internet, on social networks, there are a lot of things coming out. I do not know what is true. I see every day, ‘Ah Gabriel goes there, then there’.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘But in fact, we don’t know yet where I’m going to go. Wherever I go it will be to play, to be at the top, at the highest level.‘And above all in a team that will allow me to go to the Selecao [Brazilian national team].’MORE: Cedric Soares breaks silence on Arsenal injury nightmareMORE: Pablo Mari sends message to Arsenal fans after signing permanent dealFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisement Gabriel is eyeing a move to a big club in England or Italy (Picture: Getty Images)Lille centre-back Gabriel Magalhaes has opened the door to a move to the Premier League this summer, amid interest from the likes of Arsenal and Everton.The 22-year-old was having an impressive season in Ligue 1 before the campaign was cancelled over the coronavirus crisis.The likes of Arsenal, Everton and Napoli in Serie A have all been linked with a move for the Brazilian, who is valued at around £30 million.Mikel Arteta is believed to be on the lookout for a top centre-back with the Gunners once again having serious problems in the defensive department after consecutive losses in the Premier League.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTAnd while Gabriel admitted that his future is yet to be decided, he is keen on a move to England or Italy.‘It is gratifying because there are a lot of teams talking about me,’ Gabriel told L’Equipe.  Advertisement Arsenal target Gabriel Magalhaes keen on move to the Premier League Commentlast_img read more

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