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Exeter expands into Jericho

first_imgRuskin College has sold its land in central Oxford to Exeter College, in a deal which includes improved links between the two colleges.Exeter paid £12 million for the additional site in Walton Street. The deal includes a programme of joint academic, cultural and social activities between Exeter and Ruskin.Ruskin sold the Jericho site in order to fund a £20 million redevelopment at its main campus in Headington. The plans include a new library and two accommodation buildings which will house 50 extra students.Frances Cairncross has said that the new site will be Exeter’s “third quadrangle.”Audrey Mullender, Principal of Ruskin College, commented, “[The deal] opens a fruitful new chapter in our century-long relationship with the University of Oxford.”The final contracts were signed in 9th week of Hilary term.last_img read more

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Qualification confusion as colleges plan ahead

first_imgHelen GregoryNew bakery qualifications will not replace NVQs in September, as widely thought. Instead, bakery colleges have been told they will be able to run NVQs and the new IPQs (Improve Proficiency Qualifications) in tandem.Amid confusion around qualifications reform, food and drink sector skills council Improve said colleges could deliver either NVQs or VRQs in food manfuacturing and bakery, which will be funded for new starters up to the end of December. From January, only the new IPQs will be offered, replacing NVQs. While some awarding bodies are already preparing Improve Vocational Qualifications (IVQs) to replace VRQs, it was also unlikely these would be available in September.Colleges running bakery courses, such as the National Bakery School in Southbank University and Thomas Danby Leeds College, have voiced concerns that courses had not been finalised. But Derek Williams, development director for Improve, said the move would allow colleges to do the necessary starts in September and to carry on these programmes for one or two years. “If they want to offer an IPQ in bakery, there’s an opportunity to do that, depending on the release of those qualifications from the awarding organisations.”He said Improve was now engaged in accreditation, while the awarding bodies were packaging them up into qualifications. Two of these bodies EDI and Food and Drink Qualifications said their IPQ bakery courses would be ready for September.Gordon Sibbald, assistant director for vocational skills at Thomas Danby, said they had created a curriculum and budget, using their best guess. “We’re only a couple of months away from getting new students and we don’t have a very good curriculum to offer. We need to sort out staffing, but it won’t affect our students.”Improve’s Williams said the parallel qualifications would be offered until December, but that availability of these new modular vocational qualifications would depend on the college’s location and the contract negotiated.last_img read more

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FSA announces new appointments to the board

first_imgDavid Brooks, Rosie Glazebrook, Stewart Houston and Paul Williams will serve an initial three year term with the Food Standards Agency (FSA), ending in 2019.Tim Bennett, chair of the FSA, said: “I am delighted to welcome David, Rosie, Stewart and Paul to the FSA board. They will bring a breadth of knowledge and experience that will enhance the FSA board, and I look forward to working with them to continue to protect consumers’ interests in relation to food.”David Brooks is a non-executive director with The Billington Group and an advisor to the food and beverage team at Grant Thornton UK LLP. He has over 25 years’ experience in the food industry and was CEO of Finsbury Food Group from 2002 to 2008.Rosie Glazebrook chairs a research ethics committee, is a non-executive board member of Public Health England and a board member of the Human Tissue Authority.Stewart Houston is a partner in the family pig business. Stewart was chair of the pork levy board Bpex from 2003-2015 and chair of the National Pig Association. He sits on Defra’s Animal Health and Welfare Board.Paul Williams has worked in the international seafood business for more than 20 years, in both the public and private sectors. He was research director and then, for five years until 2015, chief executive of the Sea Fish Industry Authority (Seafish), the UK seafood’s industry levy body. Williams is also a board member of the Gangmaster’s Licensing Authority.In January of this year, Michael Wight, head of food safety policy at the FSA, responded to our Reporting In column in the 8 January issue.last_img read more

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Microsoft Surface tables installed, tested in three Harvard libraries

first_imgApproximately 60 Harvard undergraduates were involved in testing them for ease of use and applicability of the software to research.“The general feedback from students has been positive,” said Christopher Erdmann of Wolbach Library. “During one test, a student commented that he hadn’t known some of the items he saw on the screen were even in Harvard’s collections. The student was then directed to a display case directly behind him which included the original item.” Erdmann first proposed installing the Surface tables to “provide a digital space for serendipitous discovery.”Susan Berstler of Cabot Library added, “One of the goals of the project is to be able to use the tables to complement teaching curriculums with high-resolution, close-up images of research materials from the Harvard Library collections and elsewhere.” Microsoft Surface tables—imagine large tablet computers on table legs—were installed in Lamont, Cabot and Wolbach Libraries to explore their application to research, teaching and learning.last_img read more

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Badin hosts challenge for poverty awareness

first_img Other challenges include going without shoes, carrying a bucket of water around for the day and a 30-hour fast from food.  “When I was in high school and did this, the fast from options was on a Friday and Saturday. I had to wear my school uniform skirt and polo on a Saturday, ” DiNinni said. “Everyone kept asking me what I was wearing.” “We’re roommates and I thought it sounded cool,” Kurtzke said. “We decided to get Badin to do it.” “My cousins did this at their church, and then I did it with my family,” DiNinni said. Freshmen Angie DiNinni and Margo Kurtzke of Badin Hall are making poverty awareness a hall-bonding event. On Saturday, participants performed three random acts of kindness. The 15-day challenge involves doing one thing each day to better understand poverty, Kurtzke said. Twenty Badin residents began the challenge on Friday by giving up comfort and sleeping on the floor without pillows or blankets. Many of the girls taking part of the program are not looking forward to the day without shoes, however, that is the day DiNinni and Kurtzke said they are looking forward to the most.  “You think of people who live this way every time you’re inconvenienced,” she said.center_img “I was headed to the dining hall wearing shorts. It was cold outside, so Ashley, a girl doing the challenge, gave me her sweatpants,” Kurtzke said. “It was really funny.” Kurtzke decided to get involved when she heard DiNinni talk about the experience. The challenge also includes a fast from options, which involves wearing the same clothes two days in a row. DiNinni said the challenge makes participants think about what it would be like to live in poverty. “I just wanted to get wrapped up in a blanket and crawl in my bed, but I couldn’t,” Kurtzke said. DiNinni had the idea to do this challenge because she had previously done a 30-day version of the same thing.  The challenge is also a bonding experience for the participants, DiNinni said. “When I did it with my family it was a bonding experience. The same thing is happening in Badin,” she said.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s hosts feminine hygiene product drive for the homeless

first_imgCampus leaders from Resident Life, the Religious Studies Department, Student Activities Board and the Office of Civil and Social Engagement, have come together to create a feminine hygiene product drive for the homeless in the South Bend community, running from Nov. 2-13.One of the organizers, Rebekah Go, who is the director of the Office of Civil and Social Engagement stated that after a similar successful campaign earlier in the year, numerous students came forward to put together another drive before the end of the semester. Another student organizer, junior Hannah Chenoweth, said she is happy to be a part of such a meaningful drive, and she is excited to be able to help fellow women in need. “This drive here at Saint Mary’s is one of the many examples of how Saint Mary’s gives back to our community,” Chenoweth said. “As a whole Saint Mary’s prepares us for the world and teaches us how to help people. This drive is a convenient way for students to help even when they are busy with classes.”Collected donations will be distributed through the Center for the Homeless and Saint Margaret’s House to aid local South Bend homeless women in obtaining items such as deodorant, razors, toothbrushes and other feminine hygiene products.Residence halls and student clubs and organizations can create a donation box on behalf of themselves if they contact Go at the Office of Civil and Social Engagement. The South Bend homeless community has been greatly affected by the COVID pandemic. After police cleared out a homeless encampment on Michigan Street, other homeless camps have formed around the city, with homeless individuals experiencing a lack of sanitation and overcrowded shelters. It is estimated there are over 5,600 Indiana Hoosiers currently suffering homelessness, a 3% increase from 2019. Recent initiatives have moved to help house the homeless in the area including apartments for the homeless in the Edison Park neighborhood. In addition, 75 homeless individuals are able to stay in motels as a result of federal grant money St. Joseph County received from the CARES Act.The Le Man Hall Director Holly Borrero said she sees the drive as a great way to exemplify the Saint Mary’s pillar of justice. “We must remember there are a lot of people who aren’t able to access these items during this time,” Borrero said. “It speaks to the spirit of Saint Mary’s college to provide for those in need.”Donations from students, faculty and staff across the tri-campus community are welcome. Drop off boxes can be found at the Le Man front desk or on the second floor of the Saint Mary’s student center.Sophomore Morgan Martin, a member of Student Activities Board, encouraged the community to donate in any way that they can in light of all of the problems in the world today. “Everyone knows how important it is to support and provide for those struggling right now,” Martin said. “The drive is a great way for everyone to get involved. I’m hoping for a good turn out.”Tags: Cares act, Office of Civil and Social Engagement, South Bend, St. Joseph Countylast_img read more

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The Realistic Joneses, Starring Michael C. Hall, Opens on Broadway

first_imgMeet the new neighbors! Will Eno’s The Realistic Joneses opens at the Lyceum Theatre on April 6, under the direction of Sam Gold. To commemorate the play’s opening night, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson sketched this portrait of the two same-named couples (and one unfortunate squirrel) in action. Show Closed This production ended its run on July 6, 2014 Star Files View Comments The Realistic Joneses Related Showscenter_img Clockwise from the top left, the portrait features Michael C. Hall as John Jones, Marissa Tomei as Pony Jones, Toni Collette as Jennifer Jones, that dead squirrel and Tracy Letts as Bob Jones. Happy Broadway opening to the Joneses, all four of you! About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home.   Tracy Lettslast_img read more

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Mountain Mama Reviews a New Book About the Sailing Life

first_imgKeys to the Kingdom: A Rising Young Lawyer Who Found the Key by Losing the LockFor anyone struggling to muster up the courage to leave behind an office job in search of a dream life, Annie Dike’s book The Keys to the Kingdom is for you.  Written with southern charm and light-hearted wit, it’s the perfect book to curl up on a dark winter evening.At the tender age of thirty, Annie finds herself freshly divorced. She examines other aspects of her life and agonizes over walking away from a law career she spent years creating. The idea of starting over fills her with fear and anxiety. She worries that everyone, especially the law partners she’s worked so hard to please, will consider her nuts.Once she confronts the realty that she’s living in a prison of her own making by chasing security and money when she really craves an interesting, experience-rich life, she leaves the practice of law for good.After a dating spree, Annie meets her version of prince charming, Philip, who is also a recovering attorney. Deciding that marriage isn’t for her, she and Philip become adventure companions and the two buy a sailboat, Plaintiff’s Rest. On days too windy to sail, the pair kite surfs and on windless days, Annie uses the mast to rig up her aerial silks to dance through the air.24The book skims the surface of Annie’s finances. The divorce leaves her struggling to get out of an upside-down mortgage while still paying off school loans, but the book leaves certain money matters unexplained, like how Annie scrambles up the money to buy the sailboat and affords the cruising life.Keys of the Kingdom offers readers an up-close view of life under sail on Annie’s boat. The time on the glimmering sea transforms her from a pasty, unfit desk jockey into a toned and tanned sailor babe. Sailing also bought out her spark in a way that the law never had. Annie writes, “It was as if my life had been fuzzy for years – each day a dull, hazy repetition of the one before – and it was finally now clicked into focus, everything in high-def.”She soon discovers that the quit-and-sail-away fantasy requires just as much work as practicing law. From climbing the mast to retrieve the halyard to sleepless nights worried about equipment failures to getting caught in weather, Annie spends her fair share of time wet, salty, and uncomfortable. Even in the most challenging moments, she wouldn’t have it any other way, knowing that life on a sailboat is the place she most wants to be.3D-2“The wear of the passage – the uncomfortable conditions your body sometimes has to endure for hours on end – makes you truly appreciate the stillness, the security of being in port or on anchor. The simple act of washing my face after we were docked felt like a lavish experience. . . The more discomfort you endure, the more comfort you find. One enables and enriches the other.”Amazon releases Keys to the Kingdom this Friday, December 11th. For more information, check out Annie’s website havewindwilltravel.com.last_img read more

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Former CUNA counsels launch new firm

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Four high-profile credit union attorneys formed a new legal, advocacy and consulting firm based in Washington.The firm, CU Counsel PLLC, includes former CUNA Executive Vice President and General Counsel Eric Richard, former CUNA Deputy General Counsel and head of Regulatory Advocacy Mary Dunn and former NCUA Assistant General Counsel Steven Bisker as principals. Stephen Eisenberg, former executive vice president and general counsel for the $18.6 billion Pentagon FCU, serves as advisor to the firm, according to a release. continue reading »last_img

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East Java’s sequencing reveals similarities to Chinese, European coronavirus strains

first_imgAirlangga University’s Institute of Tropical Diseases (ITD-UNAIR) in Surabaya has completed six whole genome sequencing analysis on genetic data of SARS-CoV-2, of which four were found to be similar to the Chinese strain and two similar to the European strain.ITD-UNAIR director Maria Ingelusida said data of two whole virus genome sequences had been sent to Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID), while the four others were in the finishing phase at the lab.”Four isolated sequences of the virus we’ve analyzed are closer to the Chinese clade and two are closer to the European clade,” Maria told The Jakarta Post on Wednesday. She said that so far, there were three clades of SARS-CoV-2, namely type A (found in bats), type B of the Chinese strain, and type C of the European strain.The complete six isolated SARS-CoV-2 sequences were among 20 samples taken from COVID-19 patients in Surabaya and several other cities in East Java, she said.Read also: From test kits to robots, Indonesia develops locally made devices to aid COVID-19 battleMaria said SARS-CoV-2 whole genome sequence data provided virologists and molecular biologists with valuable information on important changes to antigen as well as valuable information for vaccine development.”This data is very important because genes will code proteins that are produced by the virus. Information on the protein is needed in vaccine development, for instance,” she said.She said ITD-UNAIR would continue its whole genome sequencing project with more samples to be analyzed.Topics : She said the six whole virus genome sequences might reveal the origin of SARS-CoV-2 in East Java. Data of three whole genome sequences submitted earlier by the Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology to GISAID were all similar to the Chinese clade, she added.Read also: Coronavirus strain in Indonesia different from those of other countries, govt says”So, ours provides new findings in terms of the virus origin, that the virus transmission source here is also from Europe, not only China,” she said, adding that the whole genome sequence data could also tell the virus transmission path.Maria said SARS-CoV-2 was an ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus that easily mutated. Therefore, she said, the SARS-CoV-2 whole genome sequences from Indonesia would certainly have some genetic peculiarities although they were closer to either the Chinese branch or the European branch.  last_img read more

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