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Professors discuss water problems

first_img“In many parts of the world, drinking water does not come from water treatment,” he said. “Almost half of the earth does not have drinking water near their dwelling.” Lodge started off the lecture by discussing the link between what humans desire, and what nature produces for our use. Of these ecosystem services, water is the most important. Ten percent is directed for domestic use, 20 percent to industrial use and 70 percent to irrigation. Lipscomb said more could be done in this area. “In the end, humans are concerned about well being,” he said. “All things that we need for human well being are in some way related to what nature provides. Ultimately, the value originates in nature.” Lodge also said while developed nations are privileged with sewage infrastructure, much of the rest of the world is not so lucky. According to Lodge, one of the main problems is domestic water is not only unsanitary, but sometimes it is not readily accessible.  Lipscomb said sanitation is extremely important, as poor sanitation can result in not only contamination of surface water, but problems with roads and persistence of bacteria and pests. Lodge said what humans need is interlinked in a complex web with the services provided by the ecosystem. These services are impacted by indirect drivers of change, such as globalization, trade and governance through direct drivers of change. “We’re doing pretty well in the provision of access to clean water, but Asia and Africa are clearly lagging,” Lipscomb said. Lipscomb initiated her portion of the lecture by highlighting two of the United Nation’s Millennium Development goals. One was to cut in half the number of people without access to clean water from 1990 to 2015, and the other was to do the same for sanitation.  “It’s hard politically to get sanitation funding,” Lipscomb said. “It’s easy to get water funding. The problem is they are interlinked.” The solution, she said, is going to involve a lot of organizations.“You need to provide incentives for private investment in this public good,” she said. “If not accompanied by improved sanitation, the health impacts could be as bad as poor access to water,” she said. Building infrastructure that is conducive to providing water and sanitation is crucial for living conditions of those in less developed nations, Notre Dame professors David Lodge and Molly Lipscomb said Wednesday.Lodge, director of the Center for Aquatic Conservation, and Lipscomb, assistant professor of Economics and Econometrics, presented a lecture titled “Discussions on Development: It’s the Water, Stupid,” cosponsored by student government’s Global Water Initiative and the Ford Family Program. “For more than 30 percent of the world there is no sanitation or physical separation between human sewage and potential water supply,” he said. While legislation and funding to improve water infrastructure has been easy to come by, the same for sanitation has been overlooked.last_img read more

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Badin hosts challenge for poverty awareness

first_img Other challenges include going without shoes, carrying a bucket of water around for the day and a 30-hour fast from food.  “When I was in high school and did this, the fast from options was on a Friday and Saturday. I had to wear my school uniform skirt and polo on a Saturday, ” DiNinni said. “Everyone kept asking me what I was wearing.” “We’re roommates and I thought it sounded cool,” Kurtzke said. “We decided to get Badin to do it.” “My cousins did this at their church, and then I did it with my family,” DiNinni said. Freshmen Angie DiNinni and Margo Kurtzke of Badin Hall are making poverty awareness a hall-bonding event. On Saturday, participants performed three random acts of kindness. The 15-day challenge involves doing one thing each day to better understand poverty, Kurtzke said. Twenty Badin residents began the challenge on Friday by giving up comfort and sleeping on the floor without pillows or blankets. Many of the girls taking part of the program are not looking forward to the day without shoes, however, that is the day DiNinni and Kurtzke said they are looking forward to the most.  “You think of people who live this way every time you’re inconvenienced,” she said.center_img “I was headed to the dining hall wearing shorts. It was cold outside, so Ashley, a girl doing the challenge, gave me her sweatpants,” Kurtzke said. “It was really funny.” Kurtzke decided to get involved when she heard DiNinni talk about the experience. The challenge also includes a fast from options, which involves wearing the same clothes two days in a row. DiNinni said the challenge makes participants think about what it would be like to live in poverty. “I just wanted to get wrapped up in a blanket and crawl in my bed, but I couldn’t,” Kurtzke said. DiNinni had the idea to do this challenge because she had previously done a 30-day version of the same thing.  The challenge is also a bonding experience for the participants, DiNinni said. “When I did it with my family it was a bonding experience. The same thing is happening in Badin,” she said.last_img read more

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Students send letters to Pope

first_imgSaint Mary’s College Center for Spirituality introduced a program Monday called “Voices of Young Catholic Women” that gives young women a chance to express their perspectives on Catholicism in writing — and for those letters to be hand delivered to Pope Francis later this year.The program, which began accepting submissions Monday, will continue to do so until November, when Saint Mary’s College President Carol Ann Mooney and Bishop Kevin C. Rhoades of the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend take the letters to Rome, director of Campus Ministry Judith Fean said. There, the letters will be hand-delivered to the Pope in a general audience, Fean said.Women of the millennial generation, ages 18-30,  are invited to write letters to Pope Francis expressing their perspectives on the Catholic Church, in relation to their demographic and why its participation has fallen, Fean said.Fean said the program was created in response to concerns raised by an article published in “America” in February 2012 titled “A Lost Generation?” by Patricia Wittberg.“It was a study … talking about the women who have been leaving the Church, especially in the range of the millennial generation,” Fean said. “Men are not leaving as quickly as women are and it’s not 100 percent certain why, but … there might be something that [women] hope for that isn’t there.”Fean said Wittberg’s article sparked reflection and conversation among students active in campus ministry in the College’s Center for Spirituality. Fean said 11 students met continuously for a year to bring their idea to fruition. There, they discussed how to reach out to other women within their generation.“We asked [the Campus Ministry students] whether they would like to participate in exploring what we could do with the College,” Fean said. “And so this idea of writing letters to the Pope [was born].”The effort to reach women in the Church extends far beyond Saint Mary’s campus, Fean said. All Catholic colleges and universities within the United States have been contacted about the opportunity, she said.“The word has gotten out,” she said. “The invitation to participate went out to all … campus ministries with the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities. … It’s also been sent out to parishes … and there’s an ad appearing in ‘America’ magazine.”Fean said the goal is to allow Catholic women across the United States to let their voices be heard within the Church.Although the letters and content will remain confidential, messages will be screened to make sure they follow the appropriate guidelines for expression, Fean said. Submissions of prayers, poetry, works of art and other creative expressions are welcome in addition to traditionally-formatted letters. All submissions must be received by Nov. 1 and follow the guidelines for submission. More information can be found at saintmarys.edu/Letters.Tags: A Lost Generation?, Campus Ministry, Center for Spirituality, Patricia Wittberg, Pope Francis, Voices of Young Catholic Womenlast_img read more

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Professor receives $2 million grant to study clean energy production

first_imgIn accordance with “Laudato Si’,” the Pope’s encyclical on climate change this past year, Dr. Joan Brennecke, the Keating-Crawford Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, is working to develop technologies which will make energy production cleaner and recently received a $2 million grant from the United States Department of Energy to continue her work.Brennecke said her work focuses on ionic liquids.“Ionic liquids … are just salts that just have low melting points so that they’re pretty much liquid at room temperature,” she said. These liquids differ from normal salts in a major way, she said.“So these salts that we make are not just sodium and chloride, they have some organic content to them,” she said. “They still have a cation with a positive charge and an anion with a negative charge, and it’s just because they’re a little more complicated, have more atoms in there, that they have a lower melting point.” Brennecke said ionic liquids, which she has researched since 1998, have a combination of properties that define them as liquids that do not evaporate. This unique feature makes these liquids ideal for clean energy production, Brennecke said. “They’re a liquid but they can’t cause air pollution,” she said. These ionic liquids also help reduce pollution by limiting the amount of carbon dioxide released, she said. “If you have a gas fixture, that contains carbon dioxide. You can get the carbon dioxide that goes into the ionic liquid and leave the rest of the gas fixture behind,” she said. “Then I can take my ionic liquid over to another place and release the carbon dioxide.”While there is a huge potential for ionic liquids to help reduce climate change, there are properties of the liquids which pose problems, Brennecke said. “The problem is [ionic liquids] are kind of viscous, kind of gooey, so they’re more like mineral oil instead of water, a little bit gooier,” Brennecke said. “So what that means is that is that it’s hard to design them in a process when you’re trying to contact flue gas in liquid.”With the grant money she received from the Department of Energy, Brennecke said she is working to solve this problem.“This new project we’re working on is to encapsulate these ionic liquids in … little shells,” she said. “We want to see if we can improve the use of these ionic shells in a process.”The use of these ionic liquids has far-reaching potential, she said.“It is important for coal and natural gas power plants,” Brennecke said. “It’s the same … if you want to remove the carbon dioxide, this could be used for burning of any fuel source which has carbon dioxide in it, it could be biomass, it could be natural gas.”Brennecke said her work connects to the Catholic mission of the University. “So this all kind of fits in well with the Pope’s encyclical on climate change,” she said. “So we like to believe we’re advancing the Catholic mission.” Tags: Department of Energy, laudato si’last_img read more

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Office of Housing bans “hoverboards”

first_imgThe Office of Housing sent an email to students Jan. 8 announcing a ban on electronic skateboards, popularly known as “hoverboards,” on campus.“Under the guidance of Campus Safety, the Office of Housing has made the decision to prohibit the use, possession or storage of electronic skateboards including self-balancing boards/scooters and other similar equipment in all undergraduate residence halls and graduate residential communities until safety standards for them have been adequately developed and implemented across all models,” the email stated.The email cited safety concerns, saying that electronic skateboards “present potential fire hazards, particularly but not limited to, the devices’ batteries lighting on fire while charging.“The Consumer Product Safety Commission is actively investigating and testing to address the safety of these devices. Representatives of Student Affairs and Campus Safety will continue to monitor the status of these devices and housing policies will be modified accordingly,” the email stated.A Jan. 9 article by USA Today listed more than 20 colleges and universities that have banned use of electronic skateboards, including the Catholic University of America, University of Connecticut and Georgia State University.Tags: electronic skateboards, hoverboards, Office of Housinglast_img read more

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University chooses not to sign NCAA diversity in hiring pledge

first_imgNotre Dame is one of two Division I Universities who has not signed the NCAA’s “Presidential Pledge” on diversity in hiring, The Washington Post reported Monday. Boston College is the other school yet to sign.The pledge’s stated goal is, “establishing initiatives for achieving ethnic and racial diversity, gender equity and inclusion, with a focus and emphasis on hiring practices in intercollegiate athletics, to reflect the diversity of our membership and our nation.”University spokesperson Paul Browne said in an email statement to The Washington Post that the University already practiced diverse hiring, and adopting the pledge was therefore not necessary.“[University President Fr. John Jenkins] feels strongly that principals of such importance should be authored and pronounced by Notre Dame itself and applied University-wide, and not as the product of an association focused exclusively on collegiate athletics,” Browne said in the statement.Browne said diversity at Notre Dame is not currently where the administration would like.“The diversity of our current administrative team is not where we want it to be, and that’s being addressed soon,” Browne said in the statement. “ … Notre Dame is proud of helping advance the careers of some prominent African-American athletics administrators who are now serving at other universities.”Tags: Diversity, Hiring, NCAA, Pledgelast_img read more

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Top-rated Medieval Institute preserves history

first_imgOn the seventh floor of the Hesburgh Library, students can access resources from one of the most well known medieval institutes in North America — Notre Dame’s own Medieval Institute.“Notre Dame has resources for undergraduate education that almost nobody else has,” Thomas Burman, the Robert Conway Director of the Medieval Institute, said. “And those resources start as they always do in the world — with people. We have something like 80 faculty members who, in one way or the other, are involved in scholarship on the Middle Ages.”Over 40 of those faculty members are medieval studies fellows, Burman said.“ … A very large department in the humanities at most universities would have 40 or 45 faculty, so [for example] our history department has 45 faculty,” Burman said. “That kind of spans the globe in a lot of ways. It’s like we have a department of just medieval studies, so that gives you a sense of how vast the range of faculty expertise is.”Burman said another one of the Medieval Institute’s best resources is its library.“Often, people come from Europe to use our library and they say it’s the best library they’ve ever used to do medieval research,” he said. “It’s not just that we have a great collection of books and all that. We have some other remarkable things — like what’s called the Ambrosiana [Library] microfilm collection. ”The Ambrosiana microfilm collection was a project headed by University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, Canon Astrik L. Gabriel — who was one of the Medieval Institute’s founders — and Cardinal Giovanni Montini, who would later become Pope Paul VI. The three had seen the destruction of medieval manuscripts during the world wars and wanted to preserve them, Linda Major, Medieval Studies director of undergraduate studies, said.“Notre Dame made arrangements when Fr. Hesburgh was still young in his presidency to try to preserve, or have a back up of, or preservation of all the Medieval manuscripts that were in the Ambrosiana library in Milan, Italy,” Major said.The Medieval Institute is also known for its facsimiles, including a facsimile of the Book of Kells, Major said.“A facsimile is a replica of a Medieval manuscript, down to the tiniest detail,” she said. “They’re only produced in quantities of a couple hundred and then sold throughout the world, so they’re very rare and they’re generally very expensive, but Notre Dame has about 800 facsimiles.”One of the Institute’s most underutilized resources, however, is its classes, Major said.“We offer so many different classes,” she said. “A lot of times some classes won’t have any students registered at all because they’re not in the main stream of the courses that we’re known for — history, philosophy, theology, art — and they might be more peripheral, and students don’t think to take them when in fact they can be the more exciting ones.”The Medieval Institute offers several opportunities for students to study the Middle Ages, including a major and supplementary major, a minor and a Ph.D. program. Students also have the opportunity to participate in summer internships in Rare Books and Special Collections, The Snite Museum of Art, the archives and the Medieval Institute.Undergraduates in the Medieval Studies program are also given preference in the study abroad program at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, which was started by the Medieval Institute, Major said.Pursuing a major in Medieval Studies allows students to pursue a number of academic interests within a single subject, Major said, as Medieval Studies classes draw from 13 different departments. It is also a prestigious program, Major said — a Medieval Studies Honors student was the first Notre Dame undergraduate to win a Gates Cambridge Scholarship.“We often times offer classes that sound similar to the Program of Liberal Studies and in the same format, but the big difference is they have their program very structured and laid out in sequence,” she said. “We’re just the opposite. We let students decide on what their concentration is.”This major can be “a hard sell” to parents, though, due to misconceptions about the Middle Ages, Major said.“They don’t want to spend all that money to have their child end up with a degree in something they equate with knights and damsels in distress — which of course, it’s a lot more than that,” she said. “But it’s known probably by its reputation in popular culture, rather than as a scholarly discipline.”Burman echoed Major, and said there are many misconceptions about the Middle Ages in popular culture, even though both universities and representative assemblies were invented during this time period.“The most striking [misconception] that seems impossible to root out is that the Middle Ages is this backwards period and all of the interesting stuff in Western culture comes either from the ancient or the period after the Renaissance and all of that,” he said. “In this case, I would simply stress that some of the most fundamental institutions of the modern, Western world are inventions not of the ancient period or the Renaissance, but of the Middle Ages.”Tags: Ambrosiana Library microfilm collection, Medieval Institute, medieval studies, Middles Ageslast_img read more

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Vandalism incident reported in Riley Hall

first_imgAn art installation on display was vandalized Thursday night, according to an email sent to art students Friday by Olivia Williamson, undergraduate and graduate studies coordinator for the department of art.Editor’s Note: The artist who created the display that was vandalized, Charlie Ortega Guifarro, is a sports writer for The Observer.At the time the email was sent, it was unknown who carried out the act. The display showcased Notre Dame students who are recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The display’s content was thought to have been the motivation behind the vandalism.“Due to the nature of the artist’s installation, we believe this to be politically motivated,” Williamson said in the email. “ … Although it is normal to feel strongly about particular pieces of art when viewing someone’s work, it is never acceptable to touch, modify or destroy them in any way.”University spokesman Dennis Brown said in an email that such incidents are handled by Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP). After an investigation, a decision is made over whether charges or other further action is necessary.“NDSP follows up on any information that can be gleaned in the course of investigating, and then determines what, if any, course of action should be taken related to charges,” he said.Tags: Art Department, DACA, NDSP, Riley Hall, vandalismlast_img read more

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ROTC commissions new officers

first_imgAir ForceHarry Aquino — Notre DameMichael Balcerzak — Valparaiso UniversityJames Marvin — Notre DameChristopher Ruflin — Notre DameRachael Shanek — Valparaiso UniversityJames Slattery — Notre DameArmyGrant Arnold — Valparaiso UniversityConnor Bagwell — Notre DameTyler Belin — Notre DameMichelle Brosnan — Notre DameKiana Forti — Notre DameCaleb Keehner — Bethel CollegeJoseph Krivda — Notre DameEunYoung Lee — Notre DameJulian Minondo — Notre DameDrew Montemarano — Notre DameRina Moore — Saint Mary’sDaniel O’Neill — Notre DameRyan Pitcher — Valparaiso UniversityGeorge Sutherland — Holy Cross CollegeGabriel Williams — Valparaiso UniversityNavyIsaac Althoff — Notre DameAllison Baglini — Notre DameGregory Bombara — Notre DameTim Bowers — Notre DameElizabeth Cannon — Notre DamePatrick Colley — Notre DameColin Dablain — Notre DameJoseph Faulkner — Notre DameDaniel Fisk — Notre DameMaloney Foster — Notre DameDylan Goitz — Notre DameJohn Hatfield — Notre DameMadison Karlin — Notre DameKieran Kelly — Notre DamePatrick Koehr — Notre DameAlexandre Lemaignen — Notre DameDerek Meyer — Notre DameLeah Plofchan — Notre DameKayla Savage — Saint Mary’sMegan Villandre — Notre DameJasmine Walker — Notre DameThomas Yaeger — Notre DameTags: 2018 Commencement, Air Force ROTC, Army ROTC, Commencement 2018, Commencement Issue 2018, navy ROTC, ROTC, ROTC officers The culmination of four years of classes, training exercise and tireless dedication, 43 senior cadets from the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) — including officers from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s, Holy Cross College, Valparaiso University and Bethel College — will receive their commissions Saturday.Colonel Jim Bowen, Air Force ROTC commander and department chair of aerospace studies, said the success of the graduating Air Force cadets is due to both their passion to serve their country and their dedication to the ROTC program.“They’ve all grown from freshman to lieutenants and leaders in our Air Force,” he said. “In four years, they’ve gone from young kids fresh out of high school to real, true servant leaders, and I’m excited to serve beside them. I’m really excited to be walking around in our Air Force and see these young officers from Notre Dame, and know that they’re peers now.”Dominique DeMoe | The Observer Voluntary service in ROTC and the armed forces is crucial for providing the United States the “blanket of freedom we all take for granted,” Bowen said.“This program is how you harness the talent and the energy and the drive of this nation’s youth,” he said. “It’s an all-volunteer force, and the only way that that survives is by young men and women standing up and agreeing to be a part of military service — to stand in harm’s way and protect their fellow citizens.”Lieutenant Colonel Christopher Pratt, professor of military science for Army ROTC, noted that despite the relatively small size of Notre Dame’s Army ROTC program with 15 senior cadets, nine received the distinguished military graduate designation based on their grades, physical fitness and leadership ability — more than any other program in the Midwest.“We’ve never had near this many — It’s really just a testament to their hard work and the effort they’ve put in over the years,” he said.Pratt also discussed the importance of the ROTC program, and said the mission of ROTC is uniquely aligned with Notre Dame’s mission.“The values, the character and the morals that Notre Dame looks for in its students marries up very well with what the army and the armed services are looking for,” he said. “Service manifests itself in numerous ways — there is service to your community and service to your country, but all of them represent being part of something bigger than yourself, which is really what Notre Dame is about: going off, doing good in the world and contributing and being part of something that’s not just about you, but about giving back, at whatever level. I think that relationship with the University has always been there, and it’s why the students who are part of the program and part of the University do so well.”The Air Force ROTC will commission six officers, the Army will commission 15 and the Navy will commission 22 officers Saturday. The ceremony will be held in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center and the keynote address delivered by General Robin Rand.last_img read more

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‘Show Some Skin’ looks to create dialogue, enhances production value

first_imgFor eight years running, “Show Some Skin” has challenged its audience to think about how race, gender, sexuality, class and other aspects of identity impacts the Notre Dame community.Each night from Wednesday through Saturday at 7 p.m. in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, “Show Some Skin” will once again challenge students, faculty and community members to think about these issues through the performance of around 20 personal, anonymous monologues written by Notre Dame students.This year, “Show Some Skin,” received 110 monologue submissions, a record number for the show. However, only around 20 to 25 of the submitted monologues will be performed, junior Peyton Davis, an associate produce for the show, said. In order to narrow the stories down, the story board, which is comprised of 12 individuals — including the faculty advisors, the producers, the directors and other student leaders for the show — sit down and read through all the monologues.“After reading all of them, we vote on each one while looking at a variety of criteria, including ‘How well does it fit our year’s theme and call for stories?’ and ‘What stories haven’t we heard before?’” Davis said. “That’s something that’s really important to us, because being a platform for vulnerability, we look for the stories that say something about the community that we haven’t heard before … We actually had our first pro-life monologue, so that was really special, because we got to see another perspective on an issue that at least, in some corners, becomes a little bit mystified, and it really makes for a better dialogue about such issues.”The cast tries to take the discussion beyond the stage by discussing the issues the monologues raise during rehearsals, as well as performing monologues in classes upon request.“It’s a movement towards dialogue,” Savanna Morgan, a junior and the technical director of the show, said. “So, come ready to engage and receive, and also expect that two to three hour discussion afterwards … What happens in the theatre doesn’t stay in the theatre. That’s the goal.”“They [students] can expect to be uncomfortable,” Trever Carter, a senior and the executive producer of the show, said. “I think that if people don’t leave uncomfortable, then we didn’t do our job. Especially for a pretty homogenous white, straight, Catholic campus, getting white, straight, Catholic people to deal with a lot of pretty ingrained biases or racism or anything like that is inherently uncomfortable … They can really expect to leave the show having engaged with Notre Dame as the truly diverse institution that it is, and our hope is that they take that and bring it into their everyday lives.”However, as so many monologues do end up not being performed in the actual show, for the first time, “Show Some Skin” will be creating an online publication of the extra monologues. The publication may also include monologues from previous years and videos of actor’s performances of the pieces.The number of submissions and an online publication are not the only unique aspects of this year’s show though. For the first time, Morgan said the show will also be incorporating lights and more technical aspects into the show.“This is the first year that we are focusing on the technical elements of ‘Show Some Skin,’” she said. “So I’ve been designing lights, sound and just the scenic design of the show. This is the first year that we have had both an artistic director and a technical director.”Dr. Cecilia Lucero, one of the show’s faculty advisors, said the staff are trying to balance the technical aspects of the show with the purpose of the monologues.“We also wanted to make sure that there was a balance, because really it’s about the monologue, and typically it’s been a pretty minimalist production so there usually hasn’t been any props on stage, except maybe a chair … the actors wear grey t-shirts and black pants,” Lucero said. “ … I think the technical pieces of it are going to highlight something about the piece that will heighten the emotional reaction, but it won’t take away from the story. It’s not going to be this spectacle.”While the increased production value hopes to contribute to the show’s power, Davis said it also presents a new challenge for the crew to overcome.“It’s a little ambitious and I think that everybody is really taking it in stride, and I think that it will, at the very least, challenge the team to make sure that it’s not just a theatre show; that it is just as intimate and vulnerable as it has been in past years,” he said.Echoing Davis’ comments, senior Joseph Blakely, the show’s director, said with these new additions come new production hurdles for the show.“Because we’re integrating a lot of new lighting and sound elements, there’s a lot of things that we’re figuring out for the very first time and it’s very exciting — it’s scary,” Blakey said.“I don’t want to call them growing pains, but I feel like that’s probably the most equitable,” he said. “Over the last few years … we have grown so much just as a super recognizable campus organization … We used to have a much smaller team, but one thing we did at the end of last year was that we decided to expand our team to handle some of these initiatives that we wanted to tackle this year … It’s people just getting used to new roles and a new division of responsibility. There’s a lot of moving parts.”Morgan said the new show’s new elements mark an important evolution in the show’s nature.“‘Show Some Skin’ is taking a new direction as far as what it looks, sounds, feels like — since it’s not just the same minimalistic students come on, read their monologues, leave the stage,” Morgan said. “There are more added layers of expression for the monologues and for me as the technical director — it’s keeping the true essence of the bareness without turning the show into too much of a spectacle, because we still appreciate the rawness that ‘Show Some Skin’ stands for.”This year, the show is focusing on that rawness and vulnerability with the theme “Drop the Wall,” Blakey said.“For us, it talks about … the masks people wear, the walls people put up between each other, even inside themselves,” Blakey said. “So we’re really talking about how do we drop the barriers that divide people, and how do we stop and just listen to one another and be vulnerable with one another.”Davis said what makes “Show Some Skin” is each monologue’s anonymity, which in turn opens attendees’ eyes to the universality of the problems individuals face.“I think that that kind of vulnerability is something that the rest of Notre Dame needs to see and it doesn’t always read for ordinary people to realize that these are just other Notre Dame students,” Davis said. ”That this story could be the story of your roommate, or your best friend, or the person you always see sitting alone in the dining hall or the person that you see who is always with friends in the dining hall. It could even be your professor that is writing this story. That’s really what we’re trying to get people to see.”Tags: debartolo performing arts center, show some skinlast_img read more

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