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Kartje: In the wake of LeBron’s exit, Cleveland hopes to have found a new savior

first_imgStill, Darwish adds, with Mayfield under center, “I’m more optimistic than I’ve been in years.”On this Sunday, however, hope slams headlong into a roadblock. Against the Chargers, Mayfield struggles, and the Browns lose badly. Expectations are tempered, ever so slightly.Nevertheless, the Browns and Bakermania have the city buzzing, just as basketball season approaches. The Cavs will open their first season post-LeBron unlike any other in recent memory, away from the microscope they once operated under. No one here is clamoring for the Cavs, whether for reasons of subconscious self-preservation or otherwise.This is a Browns city now, fans will tell you, it always has been. And so, in the wake of LeBron’s exit and the uncertainty in his exit, the city will cling tightly to its quarterback and the new hope he brings, for however long it might last.“Once football season is over,” LaChance says, “I think people will start to realize LeBron is gone. But right now, we’ve got to ride this while we can.” How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years Cleveland has always been a football town. That’s the cliche, anyway. On the Muni Lot tailgate, just across the highway from the Browns’ lakeside stadium, it’s the first thing everyone will tell a reporter from Los Angeles who comes around asking about LeBron.For years, they’ve waited desperately for the Browns to show some flicker of hope, wearing their loyalty through hopeless heartache as a badge of honor. Of course, it was during that painfully long wait that Cleveland just so happened to land one of the greatest basketball players of all time.But here, in Northeast Ohio, the Browns are gospel, a fixture every Sunday, and football’s roots run deep within the region. So when Baker Mayfield took over in Week 3, dripping with moxie as he led the long-hapless Browns to their first victory in 635 days, his arrival galvanized the city, just when it needed it most.Amid these tailgates, drenched in brown and orange, Bakermania is in full swing. His No. 6 jersey, already a top-10 seller in the NFL, is everywhere. Screen-printed shirts bearing his likeness are peddled in large piles, with slogans like “Baker, Baker, touchdown maker” or “Real Deal Mayfield.”A bright orange sign hangs at the entrance to the lot. “QB Purgatory, R.I.P., 1999-2018,” it declares. John Terwoord, the Cleveland native who made the sign, is already selling “I survived QB Purgatory” shirts. Like everyone else here, he’s found hope again.Across Cleveland, you can feel it. Bartenders conferring about the Browns, Uber drivers raving about Mayfield. He’s only been the quarterback for three weeks, and yet, the rookie has already ascended to mythic status in this Midwestern city. Darwish, who for more than a decade has held his own tailgate here, admits he’s worried how quickly Cleveland has fallen for its new quarterback. The city has been hurt before. “They see an instant spark, and they go buy jerseys and they call him their savior,” he says.Related Articles Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs center_img CLEVELAND — A cold rain is falling outside Quicken Loans Arena, dripping steadily off the plastic tarps and steel scaffolding that surround the home of the Cleveland Cavaliers. On this gray October Saturday, days before a new NBA season begins, the building where LeBron James became the greatest basketball player on Earth is a construction site, empty and eerily silent, save for the pitter-patter of drizzle on steel beams and concrete.On the same day that James signed a four-year deal with the Lakers, leaving Cleveland for the second time, Cuyahoga County made its first payment on the arena’s $140 million renovation. Construction has been underway since. Around the building, signs promise a “TRANSFORMATION”. But the arena won’t be finished until next fall. For now, as a new era of basketball here begins, Cleveland and its team are left mid-metamorphosis, unable to fully move forward, unable to put the past fully behind them.As such, the specter of LeBron still lingers here, even as his once-towering presence has been scrubbed from view. The iconic banner of LeBron that once hung on the corner of Huron and Ontario Streets has been removed, leaving only a few black marks on the red brick, the only subtle reminders of the now-bygone era.Lamp posts outside the arena which once bared his likeness now declare the Cavs’ new motto, “All for One, One for All”. There are no banners featuring Kevin Love or J.R. Smith or stud rookie Collin Sexton; even their jerseys in the team store are arranged somewhat democratically. Where James was once prominently featured as the city’s outsized superstar, his image plastered everywhere, his influence felt across this lakeside city, now no Cavs player is bigger than any other. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThis is the awkward ground on which the Cavs will open this NBA season. As Los Angeles ushers in a new era with LeBron, Cleveland is still understandably sorting out the complicated feelings that come with his absence. The sentiment is much different now than in 2010, when James left for Miami and enraged fans burned jerseys en masse. No one here is cursing his name or dowsing Nike gear in lighter fluid. Their divorce has been mostly amicable, anger replaced by understanding.“He brought us a championship,” says Jason Darwish, 42. “I’m not mad at him. But he doesn’t look right in a Lakers uniform.”Former Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James sits on the bench in the final minutes of the second half of an NBA game against the Atlanta Hawks, Friday, April 7, 2017, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)“He was Northeast Ohio, man,” adds Sol LaChance, 36. “We all saw him play in high school. He’s from here.”The pain of his exit is still there, buried deep beneath the surface. Maybe it always will be. But James ended the championship curse after 52 years, and for that, he would always have their undying respect. Though, as the NBA season begins and the reality of life without him sinks in, it helps that a new star is emerging, one the city is already ready to anoint as its sports savior.*** Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed last_img read more

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Ronaldo penalty sees off Torino, Icardi gets Inter back winning

first_imgMilan, Italy | AFP | Cristiano Ronaldo scored from the spot as unbeaten Italian champions Juventus saw off city rivals Torino 1-0 to hammer home their domination in Serie A on Saturday.Juventus travelled to the Stadio Olimpico after their year-long unbeaten record away from home ended with a shock 2-1 Champions League defeat by Young Boys in Bern.Ronaldo slotted in his 11th league goal this season, and 5,000th for Juventus in Serie A, after 70 minutes after Torino goalkeeper Salvador Ichazo fouled Mario Mandzukic.Juventus are now 11 points ahead of second-placed Napoli, who travel to Cagliari on Sunday, with Inter Milan 14 points behind the leaders after captain Mauro Icardi scored from the spot in a 1-0 win over Udinese.“It was a complicated game, played on a difficult pitch and against a tough opponent,” said Ronaldo.“We put in a good performance, played better than Torino, had more scoring opportunities and deserved the victory.“The 5,000th goal? I’m happy, but the important thing was to help the team.”Torino’s hopes of a rare ‘Derby della Mole’ victory took a knock when goalkeeper Salvatore Sirigu hobbled off with a hip injury after 20 minutes, to be replaced by Ichazo.And the match was decided by a poor backpass from Simone Zaza to Ichazo which resulted in the Torino goalkeeper fouling the onrushing Mandzukic.Five-time Ballon d’Or winner Ronaldo made no mistake from the spot, despite Ichazo getting his hand to the ball, with the pair locking horns afterwards with the Portuguese striker receiving a yellow card.“He did well to get a hand to it, but I hit it hard and it went in. That’s the most important thing,” said Ronaldo, who joined Serie A’s top scorer Krzysztof Piatek of Genoa on 11 goals.Croatian World Cup runner-up Mandzukic thought he had scored a second four minutes later when he had the ball in the back of the net, but was ruled offside.It was the seventh straight league win for unbeaten Juventus since being held by Genoa.“Today was a great victory to keep Napoli at a distance,” said Juventus coach Massimiliano Allegri. “We played three days after the Champions League a derby against a team that are coming off a strong period of form on a difficult pitch.”Torino stay sixth, four points off the Champions League berths, after their fourth defeat of the season.– Icardi gets Inter back winning –Earlier, Icardi got third-placed Inter Milan back to winning ways with a 1-0 victory over Udinese.Luciano Spalletti’s side were reeling after their midweek Champions League exit and falling 1-0 to Juventus last weekend in Turin.But Icardi slotted in after 76 minutes at the San Siro with a cheeky ‘Panenka’ into the centre of goal after a penalty was awarded for a Seko Fofano handball.It was the 25-year-old’s ninth league goal this season and 120th for the club, and pulled Inter to within three points of second-placed Napoli.The Argentine also hit the back of the net with a second goal after 89 minutes but it was ruled offside.“It’s the signal we had to give after Tuesday’s game,” said Icardi.“The disappointment can be forgotten by winning, we have to finish this year in the best way we can.”Spalletti has been under increasing pressure after Inter let slip their chance to advance in the Champions League with a 1-1 draw with PSV Eindhoven.“Icardi completes the work of the team as the perfect centre-forward,” said Spalletti.“We should have scored earlier, to be a great time we neet this killer instinct.“Apart from the start of the second half, when we got a bit unbalanced in a bid to break the deadlock and send a signal this game had to be won, we otherwise controlled the match.”Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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RBR Mourns Talented Senior

first_imgAlbert MartinLITTLE SIVER – Family, friends and teammates are expected to gather Saturday at the First Presbyterian Church for the viewing and funeral of Albert Martin, the Red Bank Regional High School student who collapsed and died following a basketball scrimmage.The viewing for Martin, 17, the lone senior on the Buccaneers basketball team, will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at the church, also known as Tower Hill, at 255 Harding Road. A funeral service will follow the viewing hours, according to school officials.In addition, officials at RBR have established the Albert Martin Memorial Fund and are accepting monetary donations in his memory. Those who wish to donate may send a donation to: The Source at RBR, 101 Ridge Road, Little Silver, NJ 07739, Attention: Suzanne Keller. Checks should be made payable to the Source Foundation with the “Albert Martin Memorial Fund” indicated on the check. Donations can be made through PayPal on the RBR website at www.rbrhs.org.The Source is a nonprofit, tax-exempt charitable organization.Martin’s number, No. 34, will be formally retired by the school during a home basketball game at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17, against Red Bank Catholic High School. Martin’s mother, Traci Dixon, will be presented with his framed jersey, according to school officials.Martin had played the first 6 minutes of the team’s first scrimmage of the season on Monday, Dec. 3, before heading to the bench for the final 2 minutes of the first quarter. Before returning to start the second quarter, Martin stumbled backward and collapsed to the floor, according to Scott Martin, the boy’s head basketball coach.He was treated in the gym and then transported to Riverview Medical Center where he was pronounced dead.“Albert was an outstanding young man who exemplified all the qualities that you look for in a young person,” said District Superintendent Jim Stefankiewicz. “Albert worked hard every day to excel in the classroom. Albert had a wonderful personality. He touched the lives of so many people. He was caring, thoughtful, respectful and a good friend to his classmates.“Our thoughts go out to his family, friends and everyone in the RBR community who is hurting as a result of this traumatic loss,” the superintendent said.Someone especially close to Martin was James Young, a teacher at RBR and the girls’ head basketball coach. Over the course of the last four years Young had become a mentor to Martin both in the classroom through its Ad­vancement through Indivi­dual Determin­ation (AVID) program and on the basketball court.“We started to develop a relationship almost like a big brother or fatherly type of relationship in school,” Young said. “As we moved forward, we started talking about getting his grades up, coming to school, basketball, and getting out of Red Bank and becoming a man.“It’s hard,” said Young. “There’s nothing that we’ve ever been taught as teachers or as coaches to go through a situation like this.”Young remembered Martin’s infectious smile. “Albert was someone that when he smiled, he could light the room up. It didn’t matter what kind of day you were having, when you saw that smile your day was changed.”The fact that Martin was the only senior on the team was unusual and also came with responsibilities.“This is tragic in so many ways,” said Scott Martin, who was not related to Albert. “He was really growing into a great young man. He was taking responsibility for being the only senior in the basketball program. He was the rock of the program and his teammates looked up to him for advice on and off the court.“He reluctantly, at first, shouldered that responsibility,” the coach said. “But, as we entered our season, he accepted that responsibility more and more, like the man he and I talked so much about being.”According to his coach, Martin was heading in the right direction and was situated to continue playing basketball at the college level. Scott Martin believed that Albert would ultimately go to a college where he could play basketball and get an education that best suited him, get a degree and start a life for himself.“He was hitting his stride as a young man,” Scott Martin said. “It was a big stride. It was going to be a great stride.”The school community has come together to assist Martin’s family, district spokes­woman Marianne Kligman said.Students are honoring Albert Martin’s memory by creating and selling T-shirts that incorporate “4 Albert” in the design. Students also will be selling buttons embossed with Albert’s photograph and were expected to hold bake sales after school with the proceeds being donated to the memorial fund.The district has been “extremely tested” this year, Kligman said. Early in September, 18-year-old senior Riyadh’Na Farrow died suddenly and in late October many students were seriously impacted by Super Storm Sandy.“I’m amazed by this community and how they come together and care for one another,” Kligman said.RBR will be providing counselors from its guidance department and its school-based youth services program to students, staff, and families for as long as necessary to deal with the community’s loss. By Ryan Fennelllast_img read more

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Whitecaps give Kootenay players a chance to shine at High Potential Player Showcase

first_img August 17-21st – Nelson Prospects Camp Never before has the road to a scholarship or provincial team been paved so smoothly for Kootenay youth soccer players.Now 26 players from the region have the opportunity to prove the province doesn’t end at Hope at the Whitecaps High Potential Player (HPP) Showcase week March 30 to April 5 in Vancouver.The Kootenay players will be part of the 100 invitees from Whitecaps FC Academy Centres across BC.“Kootenay Soccer is expanding all the time and there has been fantastic work going on for years,” Brett Adams, Whitecaps Kootenay Regional Head Coach.“As the professional soccer club we have added to the great work by offering opportunities and highly qualified coaching.”The Whitecaps Northern Academy qualified 23 players while Kamloops and Island have 15 and 14 players attending, respectively.The Academy in Saskatchewan has 19 players able to attend.Locally, in the Kootenays, Adams said the Whitecaps currently offer technical direction in Nelson, Cranbrook, Kimberley and Castlegar.The Whitecaps, part Major League Soccer, also work with youth soccer associations in Fernie and Creston.“The associations are seeing the benefit of having experienced professionals guide their youth,” Adams added. July 13-17 – Nelson Skills Camp July 27-31st – Castlegar Skills Campcenter_img The Whitecaps FC HPP program is a club initiative that has been expanded to the Academy Centre network to identify players that are excelling in their respective regions. “We are excited to be able to introduce this new initiative this year as part of our Academy Centre network and Showcase tournament,” said Whitecaps FC director of soccer development Dan Lenarduzzi on the team website.Adams, a UEFA A licensed coach, which is the highest soccer qualification a skipper can attain, said the HPP camp is a great chance for the Kootenay players to showcase their talents in front of scouts and college coaches.“The idea is to have all of our High potential players the opportunity to be scouted by universities from Canada and the US,” Adams said.“The immediate goal would be help these players secure scholarships.”According to the Whitecaps website, training camp for the HPP teams will begin on March 30. Vancouver-based Pre-Residency and Girls Elite technical staff, along with all Academy Centre head coaches, will lead technical and tactical sessions.Additionally, players will also receive a college prep session provided by Whitecaps FC manager of collegiate transition Ryan Clark.Following a week of training, teams will then head into the Showcase tournament from Friday to Sunday. The Whitecaps FC Academy Centers, which run in the winter during the offseason from club soccer, has allowed players to refine their skills though high-level coaching.“The plan is to give these players the opportunity to work with elite coaches for a long period of time so that when opportunities arise they will be used to a high level of instruction,” Adams explains.“When I started in 2013 we had 100 players in the Academy, we now have 250-plus with centers in Nelson, Cranbrook and Fernie.”The balance of the youth soccer season for Provincial B teams in the interior of the province run from February to mid-July.The Whitecaps are offering a handful of camps during the summer to keep the players sharp in preparation for the Academy Center in the fall. July 7-9th – NEW for 2015 – Cranbrook Prospect Camp August 31st – September 2nd – Nelson Attacking speed Camp/GK Camp The list of Kootenay Players attending the camp (from Nelson unless otherwise stated) include:  U15 Girls Michaela Anderson Sophie Borhi Sofia      Arcuri Julia       Burkart Mattea Lorenzo Shianne Michalchuk Hanna   Quinn Eimily     Taylor  U16 Girls Laurel    Halleran Maya     Ida Jesamyn VanDonselaar Taylor Zimmer Sarah Andreas – Cranbrook  U17/18 Girls Kyra       Burkart Paige     Gattafoni – Trail Naomi   Perkins Hailee   Gerun Jena       Wheeldon Abbie    Bouchier-Willans Tara       Yowek  U15 Boys Jaden    Dyck Ezra Foy Jordan Klassen – Cranbrook  U16 Boys Darian Johnson  U17/18 Boys Nolan Derosa – Trail Dylan Bennettlast_img read more

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Exclusive – West Ham want to keep Morrison despite Allardyce’s desire to sell midfielder

first_imgDavid Sullivan has extraordinarily revealed to talkSPORT that the West Ham board are at odds with manager Sam Allardyce over the future of Ravel Morrison.The Hammers boss has publicly made it known he is open to selling the English midfielder despite the club’s desire to keep the 21-year-old.But the east London club’s co-owner, Sullivan, told the Sports Bar: “Sam has said Ravel is not part of his plans but we do – as a board – see him as part of our plans.“I think I he said in a press conference, if I read it correctly, he’s not part of his plans for this season. I think he said that in New Zealand but we don’t agree with that. We would like to sit down and give him a longer contract.”However, tellingly the Hammers chief confessed they may be forced into getting rid of the Manchester United youth product if Allardyce will not use him.“We do like him, we do see him as part of the long-term future of the club but we have to agree it with the manager because there’s no point signing a player he’s not going to play.”Another Hammers star whose future is in doubt is defender Winston Reid, who is understood to have rejected terms on a new contract.But Sullivan added: “I think we will get to a deal with Winston… So both balls are in the air with regards to Winston and Ravel but both are players we like very, very much.”last_img read more

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Do Green Roofs Temper Urban Heat?

first_imgGreen roofs have higher maintenance costsConventional roofs don’t require a lot of maintenance or attention after they’re installed, points out Stephen Sheehy, while a vegetated roof has to be watered and weeded. And it almost certainly costs more to install a green roof, in part because the added weight of the soil and plants may require stronger roof framing.“Any roof leak is usually hard to find,” Sheehy adds, “but a leak in a roof covered with soil and plants would be harder to find and much harder to fix. Do a white roof and grow your pot inside like everyone else.”A green roof also has a lower albedo than a cool roof, says Dana Dorsett, meaning it reflects less solar energy back into space than reflective roof materials. But it still does a better job than typically dark roofing materials and, he adds, “evapo-transpiration is your friend.”“The evapo-transpiration benefit makes a real difference on the heat island effect, and it can even trump the high albedo of a titanium-white cool roof finishes (particularly in dry climates),” Dorsett writes. “But of course it comes with water and maintenance costs that the cool roof doesn’t have.”Dorsett cites two studies, a report on green and cool roofs from the Natural Resources Defense Council, and a research paper published by the International Building Performance Simulation Association. GardenScapes Vegetated Roof System CONSTRUCTION DETAILS Lessons Learned on a Living RoofRoofing Material ChoicesMartin’s Ten Rules of Roof DesignStaying Cool with a Metal RoofMetal Roof SRI RatingsU.S. Cities Are Fighting the Heat-Island Effect Seeing Red Over Green Roofs Luke Morton sits on a green building committee that’s been asked to advise local officials on a green building code. The code will feature both mandatory and elective features. One of the electives currently on the list is for a “green,” or vegetated, roof, but Morton has his doubts whether the case for this type of roof is very compelling.A green roof consists of soil or some other planting medium and living plants installed over a waterproof membrane. Two benefits typically attributed to a green roof are the ability to control water runoff and, more important to Morton, the fact they contribute less reflected heat to ambient air temperatures than conventional dark roof coverings.But, Morton asks, how much less?Writing in a Q&A post at GreenBuildingAdvisor, Morton looks for guidance on whether the case for a vegetated roof is strong enough to justify its place in the green building code, and whether other roofing strategies can be just as successful at a lower cost.“There a bit of good discussion already on this forum about green roofs,” Morton says. “I note that the benefits cited by advocates are usually poorly defined, or can only be ascribed to specific green roof compositions in certain climates. And there’s vigorous counterpoint about whether or not the amenities of stormwater management and energy efficiency could not be better and more cheaply provided by more appropriate materials and assemblies. (I’m largely convinced by these views). Our expert’s opinionHere’s what GBA technical director Peter Yost has to add:It won’t surprise folks on GBA that BuildingGreen.com has quite a bit of information on the various aspects of green roof performance. It also won’t surprise any GBAers that the answer depends quite a bit on climate, both from the perspective of energy and water.The stormwater retention performance of green roofs varies a lot with the type of green roof system being used. In studies being conducted at the University of Texas-Austin, some green roofs did only marginally better at stormwater retention than traditional membrane roofs.While vegetated roofs have a much bigger impact on keeping roofs cooler and shifting the peak temperature than white roofs, white roofs have a significant impact compared to darker membrane roofs.White roofs have clear and significant energy benefits in Climate Zones 1-3, but the further north you go, the more those benefits become eroded by increased loads during the heating season, according to an article posted at Environmental Building News.An interesting note: The province of Almería, Spain, is said to be the only human settlement that can be seen from space, because of its gleaming white reflective greenhouses. The farmers whitewash their greenhouse roofs with slaked lime every June to keep out heat during the summer months, and the lime is later washed away to capture the winter sun for heat. These reflective greenhouses create roughly 100 square miles of high-albedo surface area (Environmental Building News, July 2014).Whitewashed greenhouse roofs reflect summer heat. The coating washes away later in the year so the winter sun can be captured for heat.The drought-tolerance of vegetated roofs depends on the type of green roof system, soil depths, and plant species. Intensive roofs with a much greater variety of plants (including trees) require much deeper soil depths and hence much greater load design for the roof (up to 150 pounds per square foot).Vegetated roofs, especially in hot-dry climates, need a year or two of irrigation to become fully established, and during droughts will almost certainly need some level of irrigation. This does not necessarily mean they aren’t worth the irrigation they need. More effective at controlling runoffBecause a green roof is able to absorb a certain amount of water during a storm, its real benefit may be in helping to control water runoff and lowering demand on city storm drains and sewage treatment plants, one GBA reader suggests.“I studied them a bit as I wanted to be able to use one on my personal addition and found the concept wider than I anticipated, varying from underground parking garage [like under the Boston Common] to lightweight trays on the roof systems,” writes Keith Gustafson.“I see green roofs more from the perspective of water control than energy efficiency,” he continues, “meaning in an urban area if all of the roofs could handle the first 1/4 inch of rain it would have a huge impact on water control in the city, and if it is a positive in other aspects — awesome.”Agreed, adds Charlie Sullivan, who sums up the situation this way: “If you have problems with stormwater management, the green roof helps; if you have problems with water shortages, it hurts.”To Morton, however, stormwater management isn’t the key issue when it comes to roof design. All projects already are required to manage water on site.“This forum has elicited enough information to convince me that the policy I should propose is indeed a prohibition on green roofs,” Morton writes. “(Don’t worry — this proposal won’t win.) The first key factor is water: the city in question is in a deep drought, and they are really trying to move towards banning landscape irrigation now and in the future.“Secondly,” he continues, “the city is among those that is trying to be as aggressive as possible in demonstrating its leadership towards climate change. Green roofs come with an opportunity cost of having a higher albedo cool roof, which is already required locally (though high-mass roofs are exempted).” GREEN PRODUCT GUIDE The watering questionIf green roofs help lower air temperatures through the process of evaporation, the plants still need to be watered, and in a dry climate that’s a drawback, Sheehy says.“I’d be concerned you’d need to water the roof to keep the plants alive and in a dry climate, you’d be fighting against evaporation and need to water even more to get the benefit of any cooling,” he says. “Sprinklers on the roof? I guess you could use drought tolerant-plants, but that sounds really pointless.”Drought-tolerant plants need less water, but Morton admits that people don’t always like the way they look.“Of course, most of my projects have those,” he says, “but they still manage to vastly overwater them. It turns out that people think drought-tolerant plants are ugly when they actually experience a drought, so people run their irrigation systems to make sure they don’t.”Morton also has unearthed some research of his own in the form of a report from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It suggests that both green roofs and white (cool) roofs are effective in cooling city air, but that white roofs are three times more effective at countering climate change.Dorsett adds: “Green roofs are both more expensive and much higher maintenance than cool roofs, which is why I’ve never been a big fan. If rooftop gardening or urban rooftop farming floats your boat, great — have at it! But for the other 99% of the population, a cool roof would be a better choice.” RELATED ARTICLES Is there such a thing as too much evaporation?Green roofs help to lower air temperatures through evaporative cooling, which makes Morton wonder whether a large concentration of vegetated roofs would add noticeably to humidity levels.“I still have one question remaining that I believe is beyond this forum,” he writes. “At what point does extensive deployment of well irrigated green roofs actually start measurably effecting the local relative humidity and turn into the urban ‘latent’ heat island effect?”Chris M isn’t sure it’s possible to answer that question precisely, but he doubts that a wide scale deployment of green roofs would create a humidity problem.“I doubt you could move the needle very much where it would be noticeable, since humidity levels are regional,” he says. “Cities just aren’t that big and the air can only hold so much moisture at a given temperature.” “So, the question is actually taking on the last ‘benefit’ of green roofs, and wondering if it can be shown to be better than a cool roof at lowering the urban heat island effect,” he continues. “I’ve narrowed the question a bit by saying I’m thinking about a hot/dry climate (e.g. many parts of California).”That’s the question for this Q&A Spotlight. Design a Green or Living Roof Systemlast_img read more

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Wasn’t mentally prepared when I failed Yo-Yo test: Mohammed Shami

first_imgThe last 12 months have been a rollercoaster ride for India pacer Mohammed Shami. From being dropped from the Test team for failing a fitness test in June 2018 to breaking into India’s squad for the upcoming World Cup on the basis of sheer performance, life has had its share of ups and downs for Shami. But the fast bowler doesn’t believe in complaining.Considered an integral part of India’s red-ball attack in Test cricket, Shami made headlines when he failed the Yo-Yo test at the National Cricket Academy ahead of the one-off Test against Afghanistan. However, the same bowler through his grit and determination forced the national selectors to bring him back into India’s ODI squad even as they tried other fast bowlers before handing Shami a comeback.Life hasn’t been a bed of roses for Shami, but the fast bowler has not let anything come between him and his love for the gentleman’s game and that shows even in his performance for Kings XI Punjab in this edition of the Indian Premier League.Speaking to IANS, Shami recounted the horror and also said that while everyone spoke about him failing the test, not many realised that he wasn’t even in the frame of mind to take the field at that point in time.”I had some family problems at that point of time. The fitness test didn’t go well and I accept that I failed. But then, I wasn’t even in that frame of mind where I could focus on the match against Afghanistan. I wasn’t mentally prepared and had to undergo the Yo-Yo Test at that point in time and I flunked,” he explained.advertisementAsked if that bothered him as people suddenly started talking about how it could be the start of the end of his international journey, Shami said he took it in his stride and realised that it was important to let his work do the talking rather than try and shut critics.”Pressure was there, but I kept myself motivated and told myself that I have to work on my fitness and come back strongly. I have reduced 12-14 kilos since then and you can see that not just in my physical appearance, but it also reflects in the rhythm and momentum that I have found in my bowling,” he pointed.Rhythm, he has definitely found in recent times and that was evident in not just his spells in this IPL — 19 wickets in 14 games — but also in the ODI series that he played against Australia and New Zealand in January and then the home series against the Aussies in March leading up to the T20 league.For Shami, it was all about reminding people that his white-ball record is just as enviable as his red-ball performances.”I hadn’t been playing white-ball cricket for a while but in the series against Australia, I gained in confidence and just looked to keep that going even in the IPL. Also, playing consistently for KXIP also helped me. Getting to play day-in day-out helps you perform and get the right momentum.”I was just waiting for an opportunity as I had a good record in white-ball cricket. Waited for almost two years and I had it in mind that when I did get the chance, I will show what I could do.”Always knew that I can adapt to the shorter format and bowl the line and length required to succeed,” he revealed.Asked if it was different to suddenly play under a bowler in R. Ashwin, Shami said that it was fun as Ashwin understood him well.”It has been fun and different. A bowler understands the position of another bowler, while a captain who is a batsman thinks from the point of view of a batsman.”Our understanding is good as we have played together for a long time and know each other’s strength and weaknesses. Also, I could go up to him and speak to him frankly about my thought process during a particular situation in the game,” he said.Also Read | MS Dhoni’s contribution in World Cup is going to be massive, says Sunil Gavaskarlast_img read more

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Neymar reveals Coutinho’s Barca sadness

first_imgTransfers Neymar reveals Coutinho’s ‘anguish’ as Liverpool refuse to sanction Barcelona transfer Last updated 2 years ago 18:41 9/1/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(42) Philippe Coutinho Willian Brazil World Cup qualifying ITAMAR AGUIAR Transfers Barcelona Brazil v Ecuador Brazil Liverpool Premier League Primera División WC Qualification South America Philippe Coutinho Neymar The Brazil star is struggling to deal with the breakdown of his switch to the Liga giants, according to his international team-mate Philippe Coutinho is struggling to come to terms with the “sadness” of Liverpool refusing his transfer to Barcelona, according to Brazil team-mate Neymar.The Reds star was keen to move to Camp Nou,  handing in a transfer request in August ahead of the Premier League season beginning in order to try and force the situation.Barcelona remain determined to add Coutinho to their squad but Liverpool have no intention in selling the 25-year-old, despite him making it clear to those at the club that he wants to leave. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Blaugrana 4/5 to beat Juve Coutinho missed Liverpool’s 4-0 victory over Arsenal last weekend due to a back problem but featured as a substitute in Brazil’s 2-0 win over Ecuador on Thursday, scoring his country’s second of the evening.According to Neymar, who left Barcelona in a world record €222 million transfer to Paris Saint-Germain last month, suggested that Coutinho was unable to enjoy the occasion.”Unfortunately, instead of being a happy time for him [Coutinho], for his family, it’s a moment of anguish, disappointment and sadness,” Neymar told ESPN FC. “I like to see him happy because he is a team-mate and a friend that I’ve had for a long time.”He was rewarded with a goal today, for his and our joy.”Brazil coach Tite also spoke of Coutinho’s struggles following the World Cup qualifying win and the speculation surrounding the 25-year-old’s future, adding: “Of course it affects him.”Coutinho remains under contract at Anfield until 2022.last_img read more

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Former Deputy Prime Minister’s Kindness Changed a Student’s Life

first_imgStory Highlights The work of the late former Deputy Prime Minister, Cabinet member, diplomat and long-serving Member of Parliament for South East St. Ann, Ambassador Seymour ‘Foggy’ Mullings, has come in for special praise from many persons, particularly those who felt his direct impact.Teacher of Agriculture at the St. Ann based Claremont All Age School, Kay-Ann Lawson, tells JIS News that Mr. Mullings had a tremendous influence on her educational development, from high school straight to college.She recalls that while she was a student at the Ferncourt High School in the late 1990s, and the time came for the fees for her Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) exams to be paid, little hope was in sight, but for the intervention of Mr. Mullings, her Member of Parliament, who did not know her.  This would change her life forever.Her parents were unable to find the money, as one was a small farmer, and the other was unemployed.“For the CXC aspect, one day I saw him driving through the community alone in his little blue car, and I approached him, coming from school. He just told me to go to the principal – just as easy as that. I was shocked. I was overwhelmed that approaching an MP would be that easy,” Miss Lawson says.She explains that Mr. Mullings’ generosity and his service as Minister of Agriculture, influenced her to study at the College of Agriculture, Science and Education (CASE).“He was a great contributor to society, someone who made a significant impact on young people’s lives, and someone who was always approachable. I wish other Members of Parliament, and other persons in the political arena could be just like him. My first tuition fee (at CASE) was also fully paid by Mr. Mullings, and I always regard this gentleman as one of my heroes, for the contribution he made to youth development in South East St. Ann,” she adds.Former student at Ferncourt High School, and now Principal at the Brown’s Town Community College, James Walsh, credits Mr. Mullings for the development of the high school, and lauds his role in the development of young people and the educational institutions in his constituency.“The development of Ferncourt, Mr. Mulings played a major part in supporting and advocating for that. In addition, he always had a particular interest in the schools in his constituency, giving them support, and advocating for upgrading. He made a big contribution. He would call you if there was somebody to be helped, and ask that you do something for them, and indicated what he could do,” Mr. Walsh tells JIS News.“His primary contribution to education was the tremendous support he provided for the educational institutions within his constituency, which included the Moneague College, which was re-opened in his time as MP, after it wasclosed. He never sought to benefit personally from his public duties, his honesty was intact. He was a humble man, insightful and helpful. He was not someone who made big promises, he was quietly effective,” he adds.President of the Jamaica Agricultural Society (JAS), Senator Norman Grant, says Mr. Mullings’ contribution to public life has enabled farmers, youth and rural folk to enjoy a better quality of life. “As Minister of Agriculture, he contributed in a significant way to the process of reform in the agricultural sector,” he tells JIS News.Senator Grant notes that at the recent JAS monthly Board meeting, a Resolution was passed saluting his commitment to rural folk, and the farmers. “We described him as a gentle giant in his own way, that has helped transformed the agricultural sector,” he says.“Last Friday (October 11), in the Senate, we debated an Act to set up a Committee to look at how we manage properties, in particular lands owned by the State. That process was started by Mr. Mullings. He was always at the Denbigh Agricultural Show, supporting the farmers,” Senator Grant adds.Mayor of St. Ann’s Bay, Councillor Desmond Gilmore, who worked with Mr. Mullings as Special Assistant at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, tells JIS News that he had exemplary managerial qualities, appointed the right people for the job, and gave them space to perform.He also notes that Mr. Mullings did not enjoy security around him, as he felt that he was working for Jamaica, and did not see himself being harmed by anyone. “He was a leader…he led by example,” Mr. Gilmore says.“Most times you would find him driving himself. He had a car from he was at the Ministry of Agriculture, and he took it to Foreign Affairs. They felt that it was not in keeping with the image that they would want for a Foreign Affairs Minister, but it was not until it broke down, before he changed the car. That’s the kind of person he was,” the Mayor tells JIS News.Prior to his passing on October 9, the St. Ann Parish Council passed a Resolution seeking to have the Mount Diablo Road in the parish re-named the Seymour Mullings Boulevard.“This great Jamaican man, seven-time Member of Parliament for this constituency, really did well, and we want to solute him, and to say to Jamaica, we have lost a true, honest and a faithful servant of the people,” says Councillor for the Moneague Division,Lloyd Garrick.“He has left legacies for us to live with, and to work with. In his time he would sit and listen to the people, and acted on their recommendations – whether to extend a school, whether to build a new school, as the one in Golden Grove. He also led the campaign for the Beechamville Trade Training Centre in Claremont, the Moneague Housing Scheme, the Lydford Housing Scheme, electrification programme, farm roads, and land for farmers,” he tells JIS News.Community leader, Garth Stephenson, said Mr. Mullings, although he was “affiliated to a political party, was not partisan in any way.”“He did what he had to do, because of the needs of the people, without fanfare, and with pride. His legacy will live on for a long time to come. He put in infrastructure to help foster our community relations, and to ensure a good quality of life for the people,” he says.Mr. Mullings’ contribution to public life spanned some four decades,  which saw him serving in the areas of  health,  as a land surveyor, youth development, foreign affairs, finance, agriculture  and  a three-year stint as Jamaica’s Ambassador to the United States.He first entered Parliament in 1969, and served until 1983, when his party did not contest the General Elections of that year. He re-entered Parliament in February 1989, and remained a Member until he retired in 2001.Mr. Mullings headed the Ministries of Health and Social Security; Finance and the Public Service; Agriculture; and Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade.He was born on May 12, 1931, in Cave Valley, St. Ann, and will be given an Official funeral at the St. Matthew’s Anglican Church, in Claremont, on October 24. He will be interred in the church cemetery. Her parents were unable to find the money, as one was a small farmer, and the other was unemployed. She explains that Mr. Mullings’ generosity and his service as Minister of Agriculture, influenced her to study at the College of Agriculture, Science and Education (CASE). Teacher of Agriculture at the St. Ann based Claremont All Age School, Kay-Ann Lawson, tells JIS News that Mr. Mullings had a tremendous influence on her educational development, from high school straight to college.last_img read more

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