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Largest floating wind project now operational off the Portuguese coast

first_imgLargest floating wind project now operational off the Portuguese coast FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享OffshoreWIND.biz:The 25 MW WindFloat Atlantic floating offshore wind farm is now fully operational and supplying electricity to Portugal’s electrical grid.The WindFloat Atlantic project features three MHI Vestas 8.4 MW turbines mounted on Principle Power’s semi-submersible floating foundations.Following the connection of the last of the three wind turbines to the 20-kilometre export cable connecting the wind farm to the substation at Viana do Castelo, the construction of the wind farm is now complete.WindFloat Atlantic is the world’s first semi-submersible floating wind farm and will generate enough energy to supply the equivalent of 60,000 users per year, saving almost 1.1 million tons of CO2, the Windplus consortium said.The three floating turbines, the largest ever to be installed on a floating platform, were assembled at the Port of Ferrol in Spain prior to being towed to the installation site.The Windplus consortium comprises EDP Renewables, Engie, Repsol, and Principle Power.[Adnan Durakovic]More: WindFloat Atlantic fully up and runninglast_img read more

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Is Bellone’s Bid for a Drinking Water Tax Proposal a Ploy to Promote Development?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York From the crowded podium at an outdoor press conference in Yaphank last month, backed by a supportive chorus of environmentalists, bureaucrats, civic leaders and elected officials, Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone announced his method of corralling his public water enemy No. one: nitrogen.The answer? A small, modest fee on water usage, which according to Newsday, would require “state legislation to allow voters to decide whether they want to create a water quality protection fee of $1 per 1,000 gallons of water used.”With an estimated annual revenue of nearly $75 million, the new money stream would funnel into a “Water Quality Improvement Fund” with the sole purpose of paying for wastewater improvements, including hooking residences and other assorted areas to sewer plants as well as giving homeowners the opportunity to get septic system upgrades.Creating new taxes for the sake of water protection is a sound idea, and it has ample policy precedent, for such a model has been used before to help fund open space acquisitions for decades. Further, according to Bellone’s statement, it has been employed in Spokane, Wash., which similarly relies on a sole source aquifer for drinking water.Despite these positive factors, the motives of the administration behind these actions aren’t sincere. In the end, the proposed new water fee isn’t as much about protecting the environment as it is to create more development opportunities for the real estate industry. The solutions offered by the county’s water protection plan aren’t substantive enough. Essentially, the document’s main approach to water protection focuses on sewers, and their relative effectiveness in achieving nitrogen reduction—a faulty foundation on which to build environmental policy thanks to the limited effectiveness these facilities have had on Long Island.Regardless of the intentions behind imposing the fee, the call for a referendum on the issue is a brilliant political move. At the ballot box, time and time again Long Islanders have overwhelmingly supported environmental issues related to water protection, so the measure is likely to pass easily. What is most concerning, though, is that many voters who may give their approval won’t realize the ramifications.Newsday’s Editorial Board, typically gung-ho for such environmental actions, wrote a cautious April 29 editorial that called for additional analysis of the proposal, saying that “the plan lacks details.” They advocated for slowing down what they saw as a rushed process. The editorial board was right, but they didn’t go far enough. The reason why the process is being sped up is because the county executive is eager to put shovels in the ground. The paper should have dug deeper into the linkage between the supposed environmental actions of the administration, and Bellone’s strong desire to build, build, build.The true ideological roots of this new fee can be traced back to the latest iteration of Suffolk County’s Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan. Buried within that document in Section 8, the plan tellingly calls for ways to “stimulate development in order to promote economic growth and stability.”This bureaucratic code translates into the creation of sewers, which, in turn, allows for more developmental density. Advocates for downtown Smithtown and Kings Park are already chomping at the bit for wastewater treatment, having wanted sewer linkages for decades to jumpstart their lagging economic development efforts.Curbing the nitrogen issue is one thing, but looking to ramp up developmental efforts at the same time is disingenuous. Simply put, jumpstarting LI’s anemic economy shouldn’t be the burden of environmental policy. They should be mutually exclusive efforts with interconnected goals. Economic development can be achieved without adversely impacting the environment, but the Island’s elected officials just haven’t achieved the right balance to achieve it yet.The bigger issue, however, is can we trust the county with this additional $75 million flowing into its coffers every year? The notion of taxing the water we drink is like taxing the air we breathe in the view of veteran policymakers like Paul Sabatino, a former deputy county executive who previously sued the county over misappropriation of the existing quarter-cent sales tax that already funds Suffolks’s Drinking Water Protection Program. Given recent legal happenings with the county’s clean water fund, residents have the right to be suspicious about Suffolk using the fee for the purpose it is intended. For all intents and purposes, Bellone has not earned that trust back just yet.Karl Grossman, a veteran award-winning investigative reporter, is also concerned about how much of the water fee is tied to the county’s push for sewers.“Bellone has been promoting sewering in Suffolk County largely for economic development reasons,” Grossman recently told me. “He feels sewers would be a huge incentive in encouraging development and financial stimulation that he sees coming as a result. Thus, questions have been raised over how much of the sewer push is being made under the guise of environmental protection and also about the impacts of widespread new sewering.”Grossman argued that existing limitations on growth will likely disappear with additional sewering, much to the delight of the development community. As Grossman put it to me, this is “something the bulldozer boys who have ravaged and paved over so much of western Long Island and now have their eyes on its east and areas of moderate growth in western Suffolk would love to see.”In fairness to the Bellone administration, LI does have a serious nitrogen problem in its ground and surface waters. As evidenced by the almost annual algae blooms and fish kills, it has gotten worse. At least the county executive is trying to take tangible action to reverse the decline. Run-off from Suffolk’s mostly outdated 360,000 cesspools and septic systems does pollute our water quality, but connecting these properties to sewage treatment should be separate from efforts to develop unsewered downtowns and parcels.“The good element about the plan,” observed Grossman, “is that it, in part, pays attention to advanced wastewater treatment systems—systems for single homes and communities that utilize new technology now used in areas all over the US in removing nitrogen from wastewater. With nitrogen being the key cause of brown tides, red tides and the deterioration of our waters, these new systems would be ideal for Suffolk County.”In the press release announcing the proposal, development-friendly groups offered their support alongside local environmental groups. In the developer cohort, Desmond Ryan of the Association for a Better Long Island, a pro-business lobbying group, said the fee is all about reconciling growth and water quality, saying that  “striking that balance between environmental protection and comprehensive economic development will only assist in making Suffolk County a great place to do business.”To Grossman, this sewer talk is déjà vu all over again.“As a reporter, I covered the Southwest Sewer District project of the 1970s—pushed by construction, engineering and development interests—and it also was claimed to be needed for environmental reasons,” he said. “It became a $1 billion scandal.”And, he pointed out, that staggering sum represented the value of the dollar back then. Tellingly, the federal government paid 80 percent of the cost, a totally unlikely prospect today.Bellone’s proposal would be a decent solution if his administration had pure intentions—and if the public could trust that the funding would be spent as promised. If the referendum is eventually approved, the fee would take effect in 2018.Ideally, the $75 million in annual revenue should only be allocated to help homeowners in decidedly residential, single-family subdivisions convert their existing systems to sewers. But if the water fee doesn’t win the public’s affection, perhaps with the cheap debt available in today’s market, the county should consider just bonding the expected $9 billion it would take to construct the needed sewers.But the current proposal is purposely vague about what limitations it might impose on the fee’s uses. What’s to prevent it from quickly becoming a slush fund for the politically connected, and in the long run, help contribute to the further decline of Long Island’s drinking and surface waters by overdevelopment? Nobody wants that, at least officially. But in Suffolk these days, it seems that the desire to conduct business is trumping doing what’s needed to protect our threatened aquifer.Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco is a regular contributor to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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Ballin’ Gold Coast property offers ultimate backyard with swish inclusions

first_img RELATED: Acreage estate home to mini skate park There’s a ballin’ backyard at 5 Fairy Wren Court, Bonogin, which is sure to be a slam dunk with families.LOOKING to get the kids out of the house this summer? This ballin’ Bonogin property offers the ultimate backyard that will be sure to be a slam dunk with young families. The basketball court with two hoops that is part of a large play area, which also has a built-in jungle gym, is just the beginning. RELATED: Property’s wicked backyard wows with custom theme park The parents don’t miss out thanks to the outdoor bar.Crasto Properties manager Kevin Crasto, who is marketing the five-bedroom house at 5 Fairy Wren Court, said it was a kids’ haven. “It’s on just over an acre and most of it is landscaped for a young family,” he said. “The owners have three young girls so they have set it up with play areas, it’s designed to keep the kids occupied and outdoors, off the screens, having fun. “There’s even an area downstairs where the parents can relax and keep an eye on the kids.” More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa9 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoMr Crasto said the family was selling as they had purchased an “investment opportunity”. “They are buying a block with the opportunity to subdivide (and plan to) recreate this somewhere else with a bit more land,” he said. Inside, the house is also pretty spectacular. The property is on the market through an expressions of interest campaign.Trendy interiors are on show inside with timber, white and dark accents offering a luxurious contrast. Pendant lighting and a feature splashback are features of the kitchen, while VJ panelled walls add interest in the living zone. There’s also a large shed with an office set-up including a studio, kitchenette, bathroom, mezzanine storage and double garage. “Any person who wants to work from home and is really family oriented, the property is perfect for them,” Mr Crasto said. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:40Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:40 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenOpen for inspection etiquette for buyers00:41 The slide is one way to make a splash. Get the marshmallows ready!There’s also an infinity-edge pool and spa with a beach-style entrance and a slide for those looking to make more of a splash on their way in.A treehouse, sandpit, playground and large fire pit are also in the backyard.For those with a green thumb, there is a vegetable green house, plus a variety of fruit and trees. And for the parents who like to relax while keeping an eye on the children, there’s a bar in the outside covered entertainment zone. MORE NEWS: Regal residence has a jaw-dropping price MORE NEWS: Would you like a beer with that? last_img read more

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Wenger in it for the long haul

Arsene Wenger says he is more committed to the job than ever and that the thought of retirement makes him panic. “You would not necessarily expect people to insult you on the way to the train. It’s the way society has gone and you have to go with it. You can take it or not. I can, as well, take a distance from that. “I know the same people can be excessive on one side and the other side. That’s where experience helps. You have a good assessment of who you are. And you’re not influenced by what people say, whether that’s on one side too positive and on the other side too negative.” Meanwhile, goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny could be offered the chance of a loan move to Roma, Press Association Sport understands. The 25-year-old played in the FA Cup final win over Aston Villa at Wembley, but lost his place in the Gunners’ Barclays Premier League side to David Ospina at the turn of the year following some inconsistent performances and being fined for smoking in the showers after the defeat at Southampton. Following the arrival of veteran Petr Cech from Chelsea, the Poland international appears set to get the chance of some regular match action with the Italian club. Midfielder Mathieu Flamini is expected to leave for Galatasaray. Press Association At 65 and approaching the start of his 20th year with Arsenal, the Frenchman could be forgiven for considering following the path of old foe Sir Alex Ferguson into a life away from the game. On the contrary, though, Wenger has never been more up for the challenge and has admitted that he cannot allow the thought of packing in to linger. In an interview with a number of national newspapers, he said: “Retirement? Yes, it crosses my mind sometimes but for no longer than five seconds because I panic a little bit. “When we played at Man United, he (Ferguson) came to meet me after the game. I said: ‘Come on, you don’t miss it?’ He says: ‘No.’ He had enough. He goes to every game. But he has horses. I have no horses. “Enthusiasm? That is not a problem, honestly. I am more committed than ever for that. I just think the number of times you have done it doesn’t count. It is how much you love what you do that counts. “And the love of what you do is not necessarily diminished by the number of times you’ve done it. Football is new every day. That’s a big quality. It makes you question. “Because with every defeat people say: ‘What is this guy doing?’ Every three days you are questioned. You have an exam every three days. You have no way to look back. You have to prepare for the next exam and come out of it with success. So it always demands 100% commitment.” Wenger’s commitment was tested last season when, after a particularly nasty defeat at Stoke, he was verbally abused by a section of his club’s supporters as he boarded a train for home. Experience, he says, cannot prepare him for moments like that. “I have big experience and experience helps you anticipate what you will face. I did not necessarily anticipate that. Even here there are unpredictable responses,” he said. read more

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