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Leadership lessons from a ‘Top Gun’

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Flying with the Blue Angels means hurtling through the air from all angles at 500 miles per hour in formations where your plane’s wingtips can come within 18 inches of your wingman’s jet.So it’s safe to say John Foley has plenty of credibility when it comes to speaking about the importance of trust, leadership, and a commitment to excellence in the work environment.The former Blue Angel will relate his experiences as a Navy pilot, a Sloan Fellow at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and an entrepreneur during a keynote address Sunday at the CUNA Tech/OpSS Council Conference in Orlando, Fla.Foley, who flew in the movie “Top Gun,” believes sustained excellence requires not only a commitment to constant improvement but also a methodology that’s repeatable, transferable, and effective. continue reading »last_img read more

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NBA trade rumors: Lakers, Knicks among teams expected to pursue Marcus Morris

first_img Kyrie Irving free agency rumors: Star is ‘more open’ to signing with Lakers Marcus Morris appears like he’ll have multiple options this summer.The Lakers, Knicks, Bulls, Clippers and Kings are all expected to pursue the 29-year-old forward in free agency, according to a report from The Athletic, which cites unidentified league sources. NBA free agency rumors: Kings ‘prioritizing’ signing a center Knicks free agency rumors: New York betting favorite to sign Kevin Durant, Kyrie Irving Morris is also “open minded” about potentially returning to the Celtics, the report says.Morris averaged 13.9 points and 6.1 rebounds while shooting 37.5% from 3-point range last season for Boston. He was traded from the Pistons to the Celtics in July 2017. Related News “Obviously I love being here in Boston,” Morris said last month, via MassLive.com. “I’ve enjoyed it a lot and hopefully I stay here. It’s a great organization, nothing but great for me being able to play on that stage. I’ve enjoyed my time.”The Celtics entered the season as the favorites to win the East. But, they finished with a 49-33 record and fell to the Bucks in five games in the conference semifinals.“I felt as though we owed Boston to be better,” Morris said. “They stayed with us through this tough year, and I just felt like we owed them to be better. Me personally, I prepared like no other last year to have a good season to help my team. For us to not be able to make that step, I think that’s what hurts the most.”Morris has also played for the Suns and Rockets over his eight-year career. The Lakers and Knicks, meanwhile, are both reportedly planning to try to add superstars this offseason. New York has been linked to Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving, who has also become “more open” to signing with Los Angeles, according to an earlier report from ESPN.The Kings are “prioritizing a center in the free-agent marketplace,” according to The Athletic.last_img read more

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Good day for Serena

first_imgPARIS, France (AP): Even before Serena Williams quickly and easily seized control of her first-round match yesterday, things were shaping up rather well for her at the French Open. Williams’ bid for her 22nd Grand Slam title, which would equal Steffi Graf’s Open-era record, began with a nothing-to-see-here 6-2, 6-0 victory over 77th-ranked Magdalena Rybarikova of Slovakia in all of 42 minutes. Not that she wished that it had been more of a workout. “It was a little short for me, but I think in my career, if I don’t have it by now, I need to look into something different. So I’m OK I’m OK with that,” said the top-seeded Williams, who took the last 10 games after a so-so start. What happened earlier on Day Three was more surprising – and perhaps just as significant for the defending champion: Two of the top-five seeded women exited the clay-court tournament. No. 3 Angelique Kerber, who upset Williams in the Australian Open final in January, lost to 58th-ranked Kiki Bertens of the Netherlands 6-2, 3-6, 6-3. And No. 5 Victoria Azarenka, one of the only other two women who defeated Williams this season, bowed out in the first round, too, stopping because of an injured right knee while trailing 4-0 in the third set against 118th-ranked Karen Knapp of Italy. Williams could have faced Azarenka in the quarter-finals at Roland Garros and Kerber in the semi-finals. But Azarenka’s knee buckled in the sixth game of the second set, and she started grimacing and limping. After the first point of the next game, she went to the sideline and requested medical attention, which Karin Knapp didn’t think was fair. “I don’t want to say anything bad about her,” Knapp said, “but we all know how she is.” Serena’s older sister, No. 9 seeded Venus, spent a lot more time on court, needing nearly two hours to get past 82nd-ranked Anett Kontaveit 7-6 (5), 7-6 (4). The top-seeded man, Novak Djokovic, was not tested at all, defeating 95th-ranked Yen-hsun Lu 6-4, 6-1, 6-1, while Rafael Nadal was ease in a 6-1, 6-1, 6-1 victory over 100th-ranked Sam Groth. No. 2 Andy Murray was never that at peace during his struggle of a match, which was suspended because of darkness Monday night in the fourth set, against 37-year-old Radek Stepanek. In the end, though, Murray eked out a 3-6, 3-6, 6-0, 6-3, 7-5 win. He’ll be scheduled to play for a third consecutive day today. KNEE PROBLEMSlast_img read more

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It can take a decade for species endangered by wildlife trade to

first_img In just a decade, the number of black-winged myna birds found in the species’ home range in Indonesia has declined by more than 80%. A big reason is the wild bird trade: The ravishing black and white plumage and bright, complex trills of the myna (Acridotheres melanopterus) have made it a coveted prize among collectors. Now, less than 50 remain in the wild.Despite the myna’s descent toward extinction, however, international policymakers have taken no steps to protect it. And according to new research, the myna’s situation is no outlier: On average, it can take 10 years for nations to agree on protections for species already known to be at risk from the wildlife trade.The study “underscores the need for quicker action to protect species threatened by the wildlife trade,” says Ginette Hemley, senior vice president of wildlife conservation at the World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C., who was not involved in the research. “Identifying this gap is a great starting point for a lot more work to come.”  Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Though elephants, rhinos, and tigers headline the trade in endangered wildlife, thousands of other lesser-known species are also hunted, captured, or maimed to turn a profit. To see whether species scientists consider imperiled are also getting attention from global policymakers, the researchers compared two lists. The first is an authoritative tally of 958 threatened species affected by the international wildlife trade compiled by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in Gland, Switzerland. The second is of species protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the primary international agreement aimed at curbing the wildlife trade.“We thought we would see tight agreement” between the IUCN and CITES lists, says Eyal Frank, an economist at the University of Chicago and co-author of the paper. But the researchers found that more than one-quarter, or 28%, of IUCN’s at-risk species are not protected under CITES, the authors report today in Science. And they found that once IUCN lists a species as threatened, it takes an average of 10 years to receive protection under CITES. Some species are still waiting, 24 years after making the IUCN list.The study suggests that while “the wildlife trade is so dynamic … the process by which we evaluate and respond to it with policy is often too slow—trade can drive a species to extinction before we realize it’s happening,” says Julie Lockwood, an ecologist from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, who was not involved in the study.These findings are not all bad news, Hemley says. CITES protects 95% of species flagged by IUCN as being most severely threatened by the wildlife trade, the researchers found.IUCN scientist Dan Challender in Oxford, U.K., says his organization has had productive conversations with CITES leadership about how to more effectively provide conservation data to CITES member countries. “We are working with CITES to close the gap this paper identifies, but these two lists are very different conservation tools—a CITES listing requires very different criteria,” Challender says.For a species to be protected by CITES, one of the member countries must recommend adding the species the protected list and the proposal must receive a two-thirds majority vote. But nations sometimes oppose a listing because of political or economic concerns. For example, proposals to ban trade in the Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) have been blocked by countries interested in continuing to catch and consume the hulking fish.CITES member countries should clear the backlog of threatened but unprotected species by creating an automatic pathway from the IUCN list to CITES proposals, argue Frank and co-author David Wilcove, an ecologist Princeton University. The authors also suggest countries should move to use IUCN’s information to unilaterally protect threatened species within their own borders.CITES members and the international conservation community will meet in May in Sri Lanka to discuss and vote on new proposals. CITES Secretary-General Ivonne Higuero says a number of the species identified by this study are among the 57 proposals set to be discussed and voted on at the meeting. The study’s findings, she adds, “provide valuable food for thought.”“CITES and the IUCN are by far some of our most important conservation institutions,” Frank says. “We are simply trying to equip both with a measure of how we are applying scientific knowledge to guide policy now and in the future.” It can take a decade for species endangered by wildlife trade to get protection Email By Alex FoxFeb. 14, 2019 , 2:00 PMcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country JOEL SARTORE/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PHOTO ARK The black-winged myna of Indonesia is one of 271 species threatened by the wildlife trade, but it has not been protected under international law.last_img read more

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