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TRACTOR DRAW HAS ‘MASSEY’ APPEAL AFTER IT RAISES €14,000 FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

first_imgNoni hands over the Massey Ferguson to the Doherty family!It’s not everyday you winner a tractor in a draw.So that probably explains why winner Jodie Doherty and her family look so pleased with themselves.The draw for the Massey Ferguson 35X was organised by Donaghey Motorhomes after Noni Donaghey was diagnosed with Leukemia last September. The draw for the tractor managed to raise a whopping €14,000 which was donated to Crumlin’s Children Hospital.Well done to all involved in what was a fantastic gesture! TRACTOR DRAW HAS ‘MASSEY’ APPEAL AFTER IT RAISES €14,000 FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL was last modified: October 30th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalMassey FergusonNoni Donagheylast_img read more

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SA thump NZ to win Las Vegas Sevens

first_img“I’m just so glad for the guys. They deserve this win because they work so hard during training. We were all very disappointed after what happened in Wellington, but they showed great heart, commitment and determination to bounce back and deliver such outstanding performances against Samoa and New Zealand,” said Treu. South Africa were in stunning form in the final with Branco du Preez, back in the side after missing three tournaments because of injury, putting in a stellar performance, scoring two tries and contributing a haul of 18 points overall. Bounced backDespite being hit by injuries, the team, superbly led by Frankie Horne, bounced back in dramatic fashion after a very disappointing tournament in Wellington last weekend, where they managed to win only one of their matches. South Africa become the fifth team to win a title this season, showing just how competitive the World Series is. Afterwards, SA Sevens coach Paul Treu described the achievement of his team as “a huge and gusty performance”. SAinfo reporter Not only did the South Africans register their biggest ever Cup Final win over New Zealand, they also reclaimed second position on the HSBC Sevens World Series log. It was the team’s first Cup success in two years. Their last had been in Scotland in 2011. CreativityChris Dry (2), Warren Whiteley and Du Preez all scored converted tries as South Africa displayed creativity on attack and a solid defence, which never allowed the Kiwis to gain any momentum. Semi-finalsEarlier in the day, South Africa won their semi-final 12-7 against defending champions Samoa, thanks to a try in extra-time by speedster Seabelo Senatla after Cornal Hendricks had scored in the first half. EmotionalAn emotional Paul Delport could not hide his delight after the final whistle. Delport added: “This is huge for us. We put in so much effort back home – there are just no words to describe this winning feeling.” “We set such a high standards for ourselves, we need to come out and perform like that every time,” he said.center_img Two more tries after the interval, scored by Du Preez and Stephan Dippenaar, stretched the South African total to 40 points and out of reach of New Zealand. The Kiwis, however, refused to give up and a late rally saw them scoring three quick tries through Pat Lam, Tim Mikkelson and Gilles Kaka. Their victory in the final was built upon a superb first half after which they led 28-0 against the Series leading New Zealanders, having run in some superb tries. 11 February 2013 “It was just a tremendous fight from the boys. We said after what happened last week, that we never going to forget that. New Zealand also scored their winning try in extra time to beat Fiji 19-14 to advance to the final. HSBC Sevens World Series StandingsNew Zealand 96 pointsSouth Africa 73Samoa 71Fiji 66France 59Kenya 57 The Springbok Sevens won their second USA Sevens title in three seasons after a record 40-21 win over New Zealand in a dramatic Cup final in Las Vegas on Monday morning (SA time). Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Samoa won their playoff for third place 36-31 against Fiji after the scores were tied at the end of normal time. Canada lifted the Plate; France won the Bowl, while Australia captured the Shield on an action-packed third day in Las Vegas. Round six of the World Series takes place from 22 to 24 March in Hong Kong.last_img read more

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5 Easy Steps to Stay Safe (and Private!) on Facebook

first_imgsarah perez Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Related Posts Step 5: Stop Sharing Personal Info with Unknown ApplicationsRemember when we told you about what Facebook quizzes know about you? Using Facebook’s default settings, you’re unknowingly sharing a plethora of personal information (and your friends’ info too!) with various Facebook applications and the developers who created them. The problem is so bad that the ACLU recently created their own Facebook Quiz to demonstrate how much information an app has access to. It’s time to take back control! From the Facebook homepage, hover your mouse over the “Settings” menu and choose “Privacy Settings” from the drop-down list. On the next page, click “Applications” then click the tab that reads “Settings” which is next to the “Overview” tab. (Oh, and if you want to really be freaked out, read that overview!)On this page, you can check and uncheck boxes next to your personal information (picture, education history, wall, religious views, etc.). This controls what the applications your friends are using can see about you. Yes, your friends’ apps can see your personal info if you don’t make this change! Believe it or not, you don’t have the same control over your own apps. The best you can do is head over to the Applications page and delete the apps you’re not using anymore. (Use the “X” to remove them.) You see, once you authorize an application, you’re telling it that it’s OK to access any information associated with your account that it requires to work. While some developers may only pull what’s actually required, many others just pull in everything they can. Scary, isn’t it? Tags:#Facebook#Features#How To#NYT#web ConclusionWhile this is by no means a comprehensive guide to Facebook security and privacy, these five steps can help you get started in creating a safer, more secure, and more private environment on the social network. However, if you choose not to take any precautions, then you’ll only have yourself to blame when an errant wall post or naughty photo makes its way online and straight into Grandma’s News Feed, or worse, your boss’s. These days, it’s better to be safe than sorry, so go ahead and delve into those settings!Note to readers: We recently came across another invaluable resource for those interested in Facebook privacy. Check out MakeUseOf.com’s “10 Solid Tips to Safeguard Your Facebook Privacy” for even more information on this subject. When the President of the United States warns schoolchildren to watch what they say and do on Facebook, you know that we’ve got a problem…and it’s not one limited to the U.S.’s borders, either. People everywhere are mindlessly over-sharing on the world’s largest social network, without a second thought as to who’s reading their posts or what effect it could have on them further down the road. For example, did you know that 30% of today’s employers are using Facebook to vet potential employees prior to hiring? In today’s tough economy, the question of whether to post those embarrassing party pics could now cost you a paycheck in addition to a reputation. (Keep that in mind when tagging your friends’ photos, too, won’t you?)But what can be done? It’s not like you can just quit Facebook, right? No – and you don’t have to either. You just need to take a few precautions. Unbeknownst to most mainstream Facebook users, the social network actually offers a slew of privacy controls and security features which can help you batten down the hatches, so to speak. If used properly, you’ll never have to worry about whether you should friend the boss and your mom. You can friend anyone you want while comfortable in the knowledge that not everyone gets to see everything you post. The problem in implementing these privacy options is that they’re just too confusing for most non-tech savvy people to handle. And often, folks don’t want to bother to take the time to learn. To simplify the process, we’re offering five easy steps you can take today to help make your Facebook experience safer, more secure, and more private. Step 1: Make Friend ListsYes, it will take some time, especially if you’re connected to a couple hundred friends already. But this step, while not the quickest, is fairly simple. And it will be one of the most useful things you can do on Facebook. Friend lists, like they sound, are lists for categorizing your friends into various groups. The nice thing about this feature is that once you set these lists up, you won’t have to do it again. We suggest that you put your work colleagues and professional acquaintances into a friend list designated “work,” personal friends you’re not very close with into a list called “Acquaintances,” and people you’re related to into a list called “Family.” Those three main categories will separate out the groups of “friends” who you may want to hide some information from. To create a friend list, click on “Friends” at the top of the Facebook homepage. In the left-hand column, click “Friends” again under the “Lists” section. Now you’ll see a button at the top that says “Create New List”. Click it. In the pop-up that appears, you can name your list and pick members. If you’ve ever shared an application with your friends, the process of doing this will be very familiar.When you’ve finished making lists, you’ll be able to use them when selecting who can see what (or who can’t!) when configuring the security settings described below. Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Step 3: Who Can See Your Address and Phone NumberDid you list your address and phone number on Facebook? While that’s a handy feature, you may not want everyone you friended to have this information. To access this configuration page, you follow the same steps as above in step 2 to display the Profile Privacy page. You’ll notice that the page has two tabs at the top – click on the one that reads “Contact information.” As previously described above, you can again use the drop-down lists provided to designate who gets to see what and/or block certain people or lists from viewing this information. The sections on this page include “IM Screen Name,” “Mobile Phone,” “Other Phone,” “Current Address,” “Website,” and your email. Step 4: Change Who Can Find You on Facebook via SearchSick of getting friend requests from old high school pals? While for some the beauty of Facebook is that it lets you reconnect with everyone you ever knew throughout your life, others find this intrusive and annoying. You’re not friends with any of these people anymore for a reason, right? As it turns out, you can still enjoy Facebook without some folks ever knowing or finding you thanks to the search privacy settings. Click on the “Settings” menu on Facebook’s homepage and then click “Search” on the following page. You’ll be taken to a Search Privacy page where you can specify who gets to find you on Facebook. Want to be wide open? Change the “Search Visibility” drop-down box to “Everyone.” Want to keep it a little more limited? Select “My Networks and Friends,” “Friends of Friends,” or “My Networks and Friends of Friends” instead. Don’t want anyone finding you on Facebook? Change it to “Only Friends.” That means only the people who you’ve already friended can find you in a Facebook search.On this page, you can also configure what information displays when your info is returned as a search result (e.g. your profile picture, your friend list, etc.). In addition, you can check and uncheck the boxes for network-based searches too. For example, if you don’t want anyone from high school to find you, uncheck the box next to “people in high school networks.” Step 2: Who Can See What on Your ProfileAt the top right of Facebook, there’s a menu that many people probably ignore: “Settings.” But this menu is now going to become your best friend. To get started, hover your mouse over the Settings menu and click “Privacy Settings” from the list that appears. On the next page, click “Profile.” This takes you to a page where you can configure who gets to see certain information on your profile. Before making changes, think carefully about the sorts of things you want public and the things you want private. Should “everyone” get to see photos you’re tagged in? Or would you like to limit this only to those you’ve specifically chosen as Facebook friends? Underneath each section on this page (basic info, personal info, status, etc.), you can designate who gets to see that particular bit of information. For anyone not using custom lists (see step 1), the best thing to enter here is “Only Friends.” Anything else opens up your profile information to people you may or may not know. For example, choosing “Everyone” makes that info public, “Friends of Friends” lets your friends’ friends see it, “My Networks and Friends” opens up your info to anyone in your networks – that means anyone in your city, your high school, your college, a professional organization you listed, etc. You can also block certain groups from seeing these sections, too. On any item that offers an “Edit Custom Settings” option, you can click that link to display a pop-up box where you can choose people or lists to block (see where it says “Except these people”). If you haven’t made custom lists as explained in step 1 above, you can enter individual names here instead. (Sorry, mom, dad, boss – this is where you get blocked.) A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

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More About Global Warming and Insulation

first_imgWell, I really stirred things up with my last article on insulation and global warming. My intention was to explain why Alex Wilson’s results could be doing a disservice to the green building community. In the end, I was rightly accused of have done a disservice myself.So, here goes with Part Three of my take on the global warming impact of insulation. Let’s see if I can get closer to the truth this time.A public apology to Alex WilsonFirst, I need to apologize to Alex Wilson. I apologized privately at the time of my last article. Now I do so publicly. I wrote things that went too far, saying his results were bogus and he was engaging in pseudoscience. I regret those comments and have removed them from that article.As I’ve said before, Alex Wilson has done great work in his career. He’s taken green building further than just about any other person in the field. His Environmental Building News has set the standard for green building news and analysis for decades. He also has a background in science and takes science seriously. Wilson’s insulation and global warming studySince that last article, I’ve done more reading of Wilson’s 2010 article, Avoiding the Global Warming Impact of Insulation, and related works, as well as discussing it with others. Briefly, what he did was to calculate the amount of time a highly-insulated wall assembly would have to be in service to “pay back” in reduced carbon emissions the amount of global warming created by the insulation itself. That insulation impact, he stated, comes from two things: the embodied global warming potential (GWP) and the GWP of the blowing agents used in foam insulation. His conclusion was that extruded polystyrene (XPS) and closed-cell spray foam had long payback periods and should be avoided.To do the calculations, he had to assume certain things and set the parameters for his model. As I’ve written before, some of his assumptions were:The manufacturers used high GWP blowing agents.The offgassing profile is uniform.The lifetime of the product is somewhere between 50 and 500 years, though the article doesn’t say what numbers they used.Those were the main things I focused on in my two previous articles. After doing more reading, discussing, and thinking, I now see I was looking at the wrong things. Here are the assumptions of his model that are more relevant:He looked only at walls.He calculated GWP payback from various insulation materials after the 2×6 cavities were insulated with cellulose.He didn’t give any credit to the air-sealing properties of any insulation.Energy savings and carbon reductions were based on heating with a 90% efficient gas furnace.In the next two sections, I’ll discuss these other assumptions.Looking at the whole system rather than individual materialsWilson’s study looked at the contribution to global warming from additional insulation on a 2×6 wall after the stud cavities were filled with cellulose or fiberglass. So the starting point was a wall with a whole-wall R-value of 14, which results from putting R-20 in the cavities and factoring in the effects of the framing.As I discussed in my article on the diminishing returns of adding more insulation, most of the energy savings are due to the first few inches of insulation. As you add more and more insulation, the amount of energy you save keeps diminishing. If you’re calculating the global warming impact of insulation based on the amount of energy saved after you’ve already got a wall with R-20 in the cavities, the results are guaranteed to be worse than if you take the initial energy savings from the insulation in question.Since Wilson was looking at highly-insulated walls with R-values up to 60, the results don’t tell you what the payback would be if you used closed-cell spray foam insulation or extruded polystyrene (XPS) by themselves in a wall that just meets code. In that case, it wouldn’t look nearly as bad for those two insulation materials because they’d get credited with all of the energy savings.Also, Wilson’s study excluded any air-sealing benefits of the insulation materials they looked at. But if you’re using closed-cell spray foam, airtightess is one of the biggest benefits you get. If you’re going to compare the global warming impact of fiberglass, mineral wool, or cellulose to closed-cell spray foam, you need to account for the global warming impact of the air sealing materials used for the fibrous insulation materials. And you’d need to give credit for the savings due to airtightness.The bottom line here is that I don’t think you can look only at the global warming impact of specific materials here. You have to look at the complete system. If we want to get serious about understanding the global warming impact of buildings, we need to model all the impacts together and see how those results compare.Consider the sourceAnother really important component lacking from this study is a consideration of the source of the energy being saved. In their calculations, Wilson used a 90% efficient natural gas furnace. That’s an easy one to do. Natural gas doesn’t vary much in its carbon emisions from one area to another.But what if the house you’re building is going to be all-electric? And what if your electricity comes from one of the utilities with the highest carbon emissions? My electricity here in the Atlanta area comes from the Southern Company, which is reported to have the highest carbon emissions in the U.S. That makes anything I do to save energy very good at reducing carbon emissions.Or let’s say you’re going to build a net-zero house in the Pacific Northwest? You’ve got lots of photovoltaics on the roof, and when you draw from the grid, you’re getting some of the lowest-carbon electricity in the country. In that case, you’re going to have a hard time reducing carbon emissions at all. (Keep in mind, though, that insulating homes does a lot more than just helping with our global warming problem.)The fact is that you’ve got to be able to account for the source of the energy being saved if you want to know something about the real global warming impact of your insulation.The real takeaway from Wilson’s studyAfter spending so much time thinking about this recently, I’ve discovered that what bothered me the most about Wilson’s 2010 article. He simplified a complex calculation and drew a conclusion that seemed to define a static property for various insulation materials. He wrote:These differences are dramatic enough that, even if our assumptions are off by a significant factor, we can draw some general conclusions about sensible choices. If we’re building highly insulated buildings and doing so in part to mitigate global warming, we should use insulation materials other than XPS or SPF…I believe he underestimated that “significant factor” of uncertainty. That all-electric, code-minimum house using high-carbon electricity would have payback that is perhaps only a tenth of what Wilson found. Would you feel the need to avoid using XPS or closed-cell spray foam if the payback were only 10 years instead of 100?The real takeaway from Wilson’s study, however, is something most of us seem to have missed. What he showed is that we can calculate the global warming impact of buildings. It just needs to include more inputs than he used. It needs to be based on assemblies at a minimum, although it really should be done for a whole enclosure. That way you can take into account the airtightness. You can also look at different combinations of insulation in the walls, floors, and ceilings. The calculations also need to include the actual carbon data about the energy being saved.The good news is that this process has already begun. David White put together a spreadsheet in 2011 that is a bit more nuanced than Wilson’s calculations. Martin Holladay wrote about it and included a link so you can download it and use it. It still lacks inputs for carbon emissions from the source of electricity and for modeling different assemblies and enclosures. It’s a good start, though.I’ve been ranting about Wilson’s article since it first came out, but now I see its true value. He took L.D. Danny Harvey’s academic paper on the subject, which is inaccessible to most, and started the process of creating a useful tool. Eventually, designers and builders will be able to run what-if scenarios to minimize the carbon emissions of a particular building. Kudos to Alex Wilson for that. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. Check out his in-depth course, Mastering Building Science at Heatspring Learning Institute, and follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. RELATED ARTICLES The Misleading Numbers Behind the Global Warming Impact of InsulationAvoiding the Global Warming Impact of InsulationCalculating the Global Warming Impact of Insulation New Blowing Agent Addresses Climate Impact of Foam InsulationInsulation to Keep Us Warm — Not Warm the Planetlast_img read more

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Pumaren wants better decision-making from UE after 2nd loss

first_imgUE went just 1-of-4 in uncontested field goals while FEU was far better going 11-of-15.Passing was also a thorn on the Red Warriors’ game tallying just 19 assists as compared to FEU’s 26. Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Pumaren rued his team’s reliance on isolation plays instead of finding open shots and executing extra passes.“I was telling them to move the ball, don’t force shots, and I told them even after our game against NU [National University],” said Pumaren, whose team lost 86-69 against the Bulldogs in the opener.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“It’s fine with me if you dribble and try to attack your man, go ahead, but if you’re just going to dribble the basketball and you know there are no stats in basketball that says ‘most number of dribbles.’”In their game against the Bulldogs, the Red Warriors went 4-of-8 on uncontested shots and that mark was worse against the Tamaraws. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LATEST STORIES Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAfter starting the season with two straight losses, University of the East head coach Derrick Pumaren wants a stronger mental game from his players.The Red Warriors dropped to 0-2 after losing to Far Eastern University, 90-83, in the UAAP Season 80 seniors’ basketball tournament at Smart Araneta Coliseum Wednesday.ADVERTISEMENT WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Phoenix trial begins for NBA players accused of assault Read Next Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

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10 months agoVissel Kobe midfielder Iniesta cools Man City rumours

first_imgVissel Kobe midfielder Iniesta cools Man City rumoursby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveVissel Kobe midfielder Andres Iniesta says it’s too soon to consider his next move.There has long been speculation that Iniesta could eventually join former Barcelona coach Pep Guardiola’s backroom staff at Manchester City, but the midfielder is not considering retiring just yet.”The truth is that I haven’t thought about it,” he said.”I don’t know what will happen in a few years.”For now, I’m focused on being a football player in another country and another championship, but always as a footballer.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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Rory McIlroy Could Be A Bigger Threat To Jack Nicklaus Than Tiger

You couldn’t have scripted a more media-ready changing-of-the-guard than this year’s PGA Tour Championship. Since Tiger Woods’s gentle smack-talk after Rory McIlroy’s British Open win in July, McIlroy won at WGC-Bridgestone (taking back his No. 1 ranking), and on Sunday he followed that with his third win in a row and fourth major victory — coming from behind, in the dark, and fending off Phil Mickelson, no less!Meanwhile, Woods missed another cut, amid lingering health questions, and still hasn’t won a major since George W. Bush was president. For the better part of a decade, it seemed like a foregone conclusion that Woods would meet or surpass Jack Nicklaus’s 18 major wins. Now, that goal is less and less attainable.Even a few days ago, I would have thought positing McIlroy as a greater threat to Nicklaus than Woods was ridiculous, but this is where we stand: McIlroy has built up one of the best starts to a career in modern golf history, essentially matching the Golden Bear through age 25, and each day Woods moves farther away from his prime.It may not look like much, but that four-major start by McIlroy is firmly in Woods and Nicklaus territory — they are the only players to have won four majors through age 25. Winning those four majors in a 15-tournament span is also a rare accomplishment. There have been a number of similarly meteoric rises in golf, but they usually come at a more mature age (see, for example: Nick Faldo, Arnold Palmer, Ben Hogan). And some early starts aren’t so meteoric (Seve Ballesteros).McIlroy has had both:Of course, after Woods won his fourth major, he went on to win the next two as well, and four of the next seven, so it’s silly to call McIlroy the next Tiger. But McIlroy doesn’t have to be as good now as Woods was then to have a chance at passing Nicklaus — Woods was way ahead of Nicklaus’s pace before injuries and possibly other things got the better of him.And now, even after clawing his way back to the top of the rankings, Woods isn’t who he used to be. At this point, it would take something unprecedented for him to match or pass Nicklaus. He needs four majors for a share of the lead, but by the time the Master’s comes around again in 2015, it will have been nearly seven years since Woods last won a major (no player has ever won four majors after going even five years between wins). And Woods will be 39 years old (no player has ever won four majors after the age of 39, not even the notoriously ever-spry Nicklaus).The good news for Woods is that he has some experience doing things that are fairly unprecedented in golf.But what about McIlroy’s expectation at this point? Trying to model the long-run performance and behavior of outliers can be particularly difficult, because the other data isn’t really a good guide. Nonetheless, assuming McIlroy faces the same regression to the mean as the average golfer does after a hot start (about a 50 percent to 75 percent reduction in win rate for the rest of his career), my best estimate is that he should win around 12 majors — plus or minus six or eight.For Tiger to beat Jack, he’ll have to break an unexpected trend, and for Rory to beat Jack, he’ll have to maintain a trend unexpectedly. read more

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Ohio State mens hockey trying to get over the hump

The Ohio State men’s ice hockey team heads into the final third of its regular season campaign with plenty to prove. With an overall record of 8-11-5, the Buckeyes’ 25 points in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association places them seventh out of 11 teams. OSU will have ample opportunity to make up ground on the teams ahead in the rankings as five of its remaining six conference series come against teams that sit above the Buckeyes in the CCHA standings. Of those two-game series, four will be held on their home ice at the Schottenstein Center. After posting a 7-4-3 mark in their first 14 games, the Buckeyes have struggled as of late, posting only one win in their last 10 times out. “We’ve had a good first half, but we need to get over the hump as a team,” said freshman defenseman Sam Jardine. OSU has recently gotten four players back from injury, and coach Mark Osiecki said he sees his roster’s improved health as a key to getting over that hump as March’s CCHA Tournament nears. “It’s important right now to get them back so they get some experience for a month before it really amps up,” Osiecki said. The team’s recent struggles may be attributable to the absence of former volunteer assistant coach RJ Umberger. Umberger, a member of the Columbus Blue Jackets and former Buckeye, used the NHL lockout as an opportunity to help coach his alma mater and instruct the current members of the Buckeye squad. Players said he had a positive impact on OSU’s performance. “Everyone took whatever he had to say and we put that towards the ice, that helped us a lot,” said sophomore forward Tanner Fritz. Throughout the Buckeyes’ ups and downs, senior goalie Brady Hjelle and sophomore forward Ryan Dzingel seemed to have played consistently great hockey. Hjelle is second in the league with a 1.61 goals-against average and his .945 save percentage is second best in the country. Dzingel leads OSU in points (20) and goals (nine). His 11 assists are second only to Fritz’s 13. Dzingel and Hjelle were recently named to the Hobey Baker Award ballot which is given annually to the NCAA’s best player. No OSU player has ever won the honor. With the continued production of their top players, along with the added contribution of individuals returning from injury, OSU might have the potential to finish the season on its highest note. A strong showing over the next six weekends would put the team in position to make convincing runs in the CCHA and NCAA tournaments. The Buckeyes are set to play against Lake Superior State Friday at 7:05 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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