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A.C. Electric Service Outages April 8-12

first_imgAtlantic City Electric crews are pictured working on the lines at 5th Street and Asbury Avenue as part of the service upgrades. Atlantic City Electric will improve reliability in Ocean City by installing special equipment to reduce the number of customers affected by power outages.Reclosers will be installed for areas serving every 500 customers or fewer, so when an outage occurs outside of a substation area, fewer homes and businesses will be impacted. Instead of having a couple of thousand customers without power because of a pole accident, for instance, 500 or fewer customers will be affected until repairs are made.Installation of these reclosers will require service interruptions this winter as crews replace existing poles, transformers and wire. Contractors will notify customers before these outages occur. The work also will require road closings and detours around the blocks where work is taking place.For the week of April 8 to 12, the tentative schedule (weather permitting) of service interruptions will be as follows:Monday-Tuesday: 55th Street off West AvenueTuesday-Wednesday: 54th Street back alleyWednesday-Thursday: 51st Street off West AvenueThursday-Friday: On West between 50th and 51st streetslast_img read more

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Students from Cambridge Housing Authority’s The Work Force Program spend day on Harvard campus

first_imgFor the second year in a row, students from the Cambridge Housing Authority’s (CHA) The Work Force Program recently visited Harvard, in an effort to help inspire students to accomplish their educational aspirations by demonstrating that college is an attainable goal.The students were greeted by Dr. Irvin Scott, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.Scott explained the importance of maintaining a “growth mindset.” The idea, he explained, is that everyone — no matter their background — can “change and grow through application and experience.”  He stressed the importance of living life being mindful of that belief.Students ate at Annenberg Hall, and were given the option of choosing one of two Harvard “classes” to attend. Some chose to study Marine Biology with Pete Girguis, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. Others chose to learn about U.S./Russian relations from staff at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies.“For the students to see professors and students at Harvard who looked like them, and came from background similar to theirs, was extremely powerful,” said Marisa Lopez, a senior teacher counselor at CHA. “Hearing from the students, the professors, and Dr. Scott made Harvard seem – well different. To know that these people wanted to come and take time out of their busy days – because they care enough about inspiring kids to achieve – says volumes about themselves – and about Harvard. Our students have all the skill and potential in the world, and the more they hear that, the better. Today they heard it.”last_img read more

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New York State police asking for public’s help in finding an Endicott man

first_imgWilliams is described to be 6 foot 2 inches and 220 pounds, he has brown hair and brown eyes. He was last seen wearing a red hooded sweatshirt, gray jeans, a New England Patriots winter hat, and a tan Carhartt jacket with black writing on it. ENDICOTT (WBNG)- New York State Police are still looking for a man who went missing almost a year ago. They say he was last seen in the area of State Highway 38B and Route 26 in the town of Maine. 32 Year-old Brandon Williams of Endicott went missing on March 11, 2019. Anyone with information is asked to contact New York State Police at (607)775-1241, or investigator Marco Marcini at 607-754-2701.last_img

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The Surprising Way Fumes From Farms Are Harming Our Health

first_imgArtificial fertilizerSlight tweaks in the type of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers used on fields could also cut ammonia emissions. Hill and colleagues showed that for switchgrass production, a simple change from one type of nitrogen fertilizer to another type that volatilizes less readily could reduce ammonia emissions and cut associated health costs by about half.Crop rotation that includes crops such as alfalfa and clover that capture nitrogen from the atmosphere can help farmers cut back on the amount of nitrogen-based fertilizers they use in the first place, says Matt Liebman, a professor of agronomy at Iowa State University.And a cropping system that incorporates reduced tillage and continuous crop cover throughout the year “does a better job keeping soil in place and preventing nutrients from moving where they don’t belong than monocultures that occupy the land three to four months of the year,” Liebman says.If we have the tools and technologies to incorporate ammonia emissions-reducing measures into farming, why aren’t we doing more to reduce these emissions now? The old adage “simple but not easy,” pretty much sums it up. In developing countries, infrastructure poses a major challenge. In the United States, loose regulation of ammonia emissions fail to incentivize action. Some livestock industry groups say there is no problem with ammonia emissions to fix. There are upfront barriers for farmers — including labor costs involved in changing current cropping or manure systems. Consumer willingness to pay more for food produced in an environmentally responsible manner also plays a role, says Lelieveld. This post originally appeared at Ensia. Manure managementResearchers estimate that livestock production contributes roughly two-thirds of ammonia emissions associated with agriculture, while nitrogen fertilizer use contributes about one-third.One way to reduce ammonia emissions from livestock may be to reduce the amount of nitrogen getting into animal waste in the first place by lowering the protein content of animal feed, says Jeff Collett, an atmospheric scientist at Colorado State University. In a perfectly efficient system, every nitrogen atom would go into making more cow (or milk). In reality, a substantial amount is excreted as waste, and this excreted fraction increases as protein intake exceeds dietary requirements. “Up to 80% of nitrogen in feed is lost to the environment,” says Opio. More than 50% of the nitrogen content of manure comes in the form of ammonia, which can easily volatilize and enter the atmosphere.Michael Formica, a spokesperson for the National Pork Producers Council, says the hog industry has been tweaking the ratios of nitrogen-rich soybeans to carbohydrate-rich corn in pig diets for years. The goal is to cut costs, since protein is typically the most expensive part of feed. Diets are becoming more targeted, and as a consequence the nitrogen content of pig manure is now “a lot lower” than it used to be, says Formica.The nitrogen that remains in manure is useful for fertilizer. The trick is to keep it out of the air so it can enrich plants instead.Better techniques for storing manure before it’s spread on fields could help, says Lelieveld. In 2017, Lelieveld and colleagues conducted a global cost-benefit analysis of different options for reducing ammonia emissions from agriculture. They estimated that a 50% reduction in agricultural ammonia emissions worldwide could prevent more than 200,000 deaths per year across 59 countries. Deep, capped pits — either underneath livestock housing or outside in below-ground, concrete-lined storage tanks — ensure that less manure comes in contact with the air than storage in open pits, piles, or ponds. The researchers found that the widespread adoption of better manure storage in the European Union — using concrete, corrugated iron, or polyester caps on manure pits — would have cut ammonia emissions in the EU alone by up to 80%.Storing manure in underground pits before it is spread on fields could help reduce the amount of ammonia working its way into the atmosphere. (Photo: Chesapeake Bay Program / Flickr)Meanwhile, a big problem with manure in low- and middle-income countries, according to Opio, is that farmers who have manure aren’t very well connected with the farmers who need it. “They lack the infrastructure to trade manure,” she says. As a result, farmers consume synthetic fertilizers while valuable manure goes to waste. So, developing countries should focus on building capacity and educating farmers on the economic co-benefits — what farmers stand to gain from picking up these practices, says Opio.When using manure as a fertilizer, some techniques result in lower ammonia emissions than others. Techniques that deliver manure into the soil — injection or band application, for instance — typically produce fewer emissions than spreading or broadcasting manure over the soil surface.Applying manure at the right time can make a difference, too. In Colorado, an early warning system alerts livestock producers to certain weather patterns that are more likely to carry ammonia emissions toward the Rockies. “Maybe you change your pen cleaning schedule around or you wait a day or two to move around or spread big piles of manure or you alter the timing of fertilizing a new crop,” says Collett.Such voluntary actions offer some potential to reduce harmful nitrogen deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park, he says. A similar system could be designed to protect public health by lowering emissions on days in which conditions are more favorable for the formation of harmful particles, says Collett. Although such warning-based systems can help reduce emissions impacts and are great for engaging stakeholder communities in discussing and considering voluntary solutions to challenges around nitrogen deposition, they are unlikely to meet the full need for mitigating emissions, he says. RELATED ARTICLES In the United States alone, air pollution kills about 115,000 people a year — more than three times the number of deaths caused by motor vehicles. Worldwide, some 7 million people died in 2012 from exposure to air pollution, according to the World Health Organization. The U.S. and other developed nations have taken major steps in recent decades to decrease pollution emissions from smokestacks and tailpipes. Yet a surprising source of harmful air pollution particles — emissions of ammonia from livestock manure and synthetic fertilizer application — continues to grow in parts of the U.S., Asia, and Europe.“When people think about [threats to] air quality, they think about factories and power plants and transportation. But agriculture is a substantial contributor to reduced air quality, too,” says Jason Hill, associate professor of bioproducts and biosystems engineering at the University of Minnesota. Potential solutions, say Hill and other experts, will hinge on the efforts of industry, society and government regulators. Regulation questionsThe U.S. regulates PM2.5 and gaseous pollutants, including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ground-level ozone, under the Clean Air Act. As a result, levels of these pollutants have decreased over the past few decades. Yet gaseous ammonia, a precursor to PM2.5, hasn’t received as much attention from government regulators.That’s in part due to the way that ammonia is emitted, says Galloway. It’s relatively easy to regulate air pollution point sources by putting a catalytic converter on a car or a reduction device on a smokestack, but the sources of ammonia are heterogeneous and diffuse. “With ammonia there’s no direct way of regulating the emissions. You have to become more efficient in growing crops and managing manure,” Galloway says.In 2011, the Integrated Nitrogen Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board recommended that the EPA explore regulating ammonia emissions. Agriculture industry groups opposed the move. The EPA has yet to act on the recommendations, though the agency does consider ammonia emissions a precursor to PM2.5 and acknowledges that long-term ammonia air exposure can increase the risk of breathing and other lung problems.EPA scientists use the open-source Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to model air pollution scenarios and answer questions that remain about the air pollution contribution of gaseous ammonia from agriculture. The model allows researchers to investigate how changes in ammonia emissions from different sectors can change particulate matter concentrations through time, says Jesse Bash, a physical scientist in EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory. According to Bash, reducing ammonia emissions may do more to lower particulate matter concentrations in some regions than others. “Obtaining that information will help us develop a model that’s relevant for informing people on the policy side,” he says.The Netherlands Ammonia and Livestock Farming Order creates rules on new housing and better feed to reduce the amount of ammonia leaving farms. In 2012, the Economic Commission for Europe (a United Nations program created to encourage economic cooperation between member states) instituted limits and voluntary reduction targets for EU member states through the Gothenburg Protocol of the United Nations’ Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution. Ammonia emissions in the European Union decreased by 23% between 1990 and 2015. In 2015, several member states and the European Union as a whole exceeded ammonia limits set by the convention.Another regulatory approach could involve reducing availability of the other air pollutants that gaseous ammonia reacts with to form harmful particulates. “You need a certain amount of background pollution so that agricultural emissions can start to increase PM2.5,” says Susanne Bauer, an atmospheric scientist at Columbia University’s Center for Climate Systems Research and the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies.Bauer and her colleagues modeled future emissions scenarios and showed that further reducing vehicle and industrial emissions could lead to a decrease in health-harming aerosols, even if farm emissions continue to rise. Yet that doesn’t mean we should ignore the problem of ammonia emissions now, she says.“As a society we discuss efficient engines and other approaches to clean air,” Bauer says. “It’s time to start taking a critical look at the food production sector as well.”center_img Ozone Pollution in the WestAll About Indoor Air QualityAre Traffic-Clogged Cities Ready for Congestion Pricing?Monitoring Air Quality at Home These tiny specks of particulate matter — about 1/30th the width of a human hair — are called PM2.5 and have many sources. Power plants, factories, and cars can pump such particles — and the precursors to these particles — into the air. So, too, can natural events, such as forest fires. Sometimes PM2.5 forms when gaseous chemicals react in the atmosphere. Ammonia, a nitrogen-based compound, is one of those chemicals.In the past 70 years, global emissions of ammonia have more than doubled from 23 to 60 teragrams per year. (One teragram is 1 billion kilograms or 2.2 billion pounds.) Researchers say the increase is due in large part to an increase in ammonia emissions from agriculture. Our ability to grow crops depends on nitrogen, which is a critical plant nutrient. But in overabundance, nitrogen can spell trouble. Nitrogen in animal waste and in excess fertilizer can turn into gaseous ammonia. In fact, in the U.S. and Canada, agriculture accounts for more than three-fourths of all ammonia emissions.When ammonia enters the atmosphere, it combines with air pollutants — mainly nitrogen and sulfuric oxide compounds — from nearby vehicles, power plants, and factories to form PM2.5, which can travel long distances in the atmosphere. That’s how ammonia emissions in one part of the country can impact air quality in a downwind region.A few years ago, a group of scientists led by Jos Lelieveld, a researcher at Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Germany, showed that agricultural emissions were the largest contributor to PM2.5 in Europe, Japan, Korea, Russia, Turkey and the eastern U.S., and the leading cause of deaths attributable to air pollution in Germany, Japan, Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine. They estimated on a global scale that one-fifth of PM2.5-related deaths could be avoided by eliminating agricultural air emissions.“There’s a very tight link between growing food and ammonia-based small particles in the atmosphere,” says James Galloway, a biogeochemist at the University of Virginia who studies how nitrogen cycles through the environment.Technologies to tackle the ammonia emissions problem already exist, says Carolyn Opio, a livestock policy officer at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in Rome. Researchers now are working on ways to apply them in ways that don’t harm our ability to produce food. Lindsey Konkel is a New Jersey-based freelance journalist who writes about science, health and the environment. The science on agricultural ammonia emissionsSmall air pollution particles can infiltrate deep into the lungs and even enter the bloodstream. In very old people and people with underlying illnesses such as asthma and heart disease, they can make heart and breathing problems worse and may even result in death.last_img read more

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YouTube’s iOS Livestreaming Feature Is A Win For Cord Cutters

first_img9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Related Posts john paul titlow Watching Coachella from your phone just got easier. At long last, iOS users can tap into YouTube’s live video streams, thanks to an update pushed out to the app yesterday. It may seem like a minor thing, but the addition of livestreaming support to YouTube for iOS is a pretty nice touch, especially if you’re getting your “TV” content from your tablet or smartphone. This is a win for cord cutters. As somebody who relies exclusively on Internet streaming boxes and mobile devices to fill their 48″ HDTV screen with moving pictures, I’ve long wished YouTube’s native app would give me access to the live-streamed stuff. In recent years, YouTube has been making live video feeds available for whatever major political and entertainment events they can get the rights to stream. This includes music festivals like Coachella, sporting events and just about every major televised event in the course of each presidential election. You know, exactly the kind of thing for which we tune into live TV.Internet TV User Experience: It’s Getting There…The problem with relying on the Internet for TV content is that the user experience is unpolished. As exciting as all this new TV tech might seem, there’s still something to be said for sitting in front of a television set, pressing a button and leaning back. You can’t really do that with Internet TV, but the experience is getting there. Part of the equation is smart app design such as that found in iPad video apps like Frequency, ShowYou and Vodio.  YouTube’s own four-month-old iPad app is the best the service has ever looked on Apple’s market-leading tablet (it’s naturally quite at home on Android as well).  Still, while a great mobile app UI is important, it’s useless without the means to get it to the TV, which is where technologies like Apple’s AirPlay come in. And of course, the most crucial part of all is the content itself. This update stands to make YouTube a much better source of that content. Meanwhile, if Aereo survives the TV industry’s litigious onslaught, it will be, if you’ll pardon the buzzword, a total game-changer for this type of TV-viewing experience. YouTube’s Role In TV’s FutureOn the content front, YouTube has been ramping up its original, TV-style content for awhile now, even opening its own TV studio in Los Angeles. Like Hulu and Netflix, YouTube knows that people are going to be turning to the Internet for more and more  of their TV-viewing, and they want to stake out as big of a slice of that pie as possible. But while binging on Arrested Development on Netflix is great and all, certain shows and events are best enjoyed live. Trying to tune into those things via tablets and streaming boxes is a pretty clunky experience. As the interfaces mature and content selection widens, it’s going to get better. YouTube is one of players that will be right at the heart of this evolution, which will lead to the future of what we now think of as “TV.” Adding live streaming support inches us toward that future just enough that it’s worth noting. This is not a blockbuster, life-altering feature for cord cutters – It’s not like HBO just gave us all HBO Go access for free out of the kindness of their hearts – but it’s an important step toward making mobile devices more suitable sources of television-style content. Combined with apps like Aereo and Hulu Plus, YouTube makes “TV” something that increasingly comes from the Internet, not from cable providers.  5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnoutcenter_img 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Tags:#airplay#Internet TV#mobile#YouTube last_img read more

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ICC rejects Sachin Tendulkar’s idea of changing ODI format

first_imgThe International Cricket Council (ICC) on Wednesday rejected Sachin Tendulkar’s master plan for one-day cricket.ICC CEO Haroon Lorgat and general manager David Richardson turned down Sachin’s radical proposal of converting the one-day game into battle of four innings.The Indian legendary had written to the ICC CEO proposing to change the current format of one-day internationals (ODIs) into four innings of 25 overs each along with various other suggestions.However ICC’s top bosses felt there was no impending threat to the current 50 overs game and thereby no need to the change the format.Tweeting about his disapproval, Lorgat said that there was not very strong support for Sachin’s proposal as of now and spelt out that the present ODI format enjoyed high popularity.Richardson also said that the Clive Lloyd-led ICC Cricket Committee too had discussed the proposal of dividing one-day cricket into four innings and had rejected it.last_img read more

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LSU Offers Football Scholarship To 8th Grader Dylan Moses

There’s being ahead of the competition and then there’s what Les Myles did this week. The LSU coach who is known for his bold – and questionable – decisions during a football game and his staff offered Dylan Moses a scholarship for when he is ready to attend college. And that would be in 2017.You see, Moses is 14 and headed to the eighth grade. That is not a typo.Following a warped lead established by Washington, which had an eighth-grader commit to its school, the LSU coaching staff watched with amazement as the youth ran a 4.46 in the 40-yard dash at a Tigers’ football camp. Throw in that he is maturely built at 6-feet, 2o5 pounds, and the coaches were salivating.The offer, though, even stunned the kid.“I was kind of shocked when I first heard it — it was a dream come true,” Moses said. “I’ve always wanted to play for LSU since I was a kid, and now it’s coming true in front of my eyes.”“The coaches told me they were offering — and they were serious. I thought they were playing,” Edward Moses said. “Really, I thought that they were joking around until I saw the serious look on their faces. So I rolled with it. Let’s see where it’s going to end up.”Much has been made of the offer since word got out the Tigers were interested in a soon-to-be eighth grader. Indeed, even if he accepted the offer,  Moses couldn’t officially sign with LSU for another five years.His workout numbers certainly don’t reflect that youth. In addition to the blistering 40 time, the middle-schooler posted a broad jump of 9 feet, 3 inches and a 34-inch vertical leap. Impressive as they were, the latter two weren’t so surprising to his father.“I already knew that he could jump the 34-inch vertical, and we were actually working toward 9 feet in the broad jump. I didn’t think it was going to come then, but I felt it coming,” Edward Moses said. “The 40 — that blew me away. I wasn’t expecting a 4.46 40-yard dash.”And he was not expecting his son to draw an offer this soon. “The coaches told me they were offering — and they were serious. I thought they were playing,” Edward Moses said. “Really, I thought that they were joking around until I saw the serious look on their faces. So I rolled with it. Let’s see where it’s going to end up.” read more

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