Home » Archive by category bcnpfbkq

Australian Navy depth sounder helps NZ in quake aftermath

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Australian Navy depth sounder helps New Zealand in quake aftermath Share this article View post tag: Royal Australian Navy December 5, 2016 View post tag: New Zealand View post tag: Hydrographic The Royal Australian Navy laser airborne depth sounder flight has deployed to assist in disaster relief efforts off the South Island of New Zealand.The Cairns-based flight has conducted a hydrographic survey of the sea floor in the coastal margins of the north-east coast of the South Island following the recent 7.9 magnitude earthquake near Christchurch.Commanding Officer laser airborne depth sounder flight, Lieutenant Commander Susanna Hung, said the flight’s role was to resurvey the coastline for the safety of navigation and to assist in determining the extent of movement from the earthquake.“We were pleased to deploy at the request of the New Zealand government to survey the sea floor off the north east coast of the South Island,” Lieutenant Commander Hung said.“In our de Havilland Dash 8 – 200 we flew over the area and collected hydrographic survey data, which revealed what has happened below the waterline, and identified shifts in the ocean floor which mariners need to be aware of.“The data we collected will be provided to the New Zealand Hydrographic Authority for production of updated nautical charts.”Earlier in the month, HMAS Darwin deployed and supported disaster relief efforts in New Zealand, following the earthquake which damaged houses, government building and civil infrastructure and isolated the Kaikoura region.The frigate used her embarked S-70B-2 Seahawk helicopter to evacuate civilians and to help distribute emergency supplies.The Laser Airborne Depth Sounder is part of Royal Australian Navy’s Hydrographic Service and is supported by Fugro LADS Corporation and Cobham.Navy personnel operate the airborne survey system from the main cabin of the aircraft and pass the survey data to personnel on the ground, which is forwarded to the Australian Hydrographic Office for final verification. Authorities Australian Navy depth sounder helps New Zealand in quake aftermathlast_img read more

Continue reading

VIDEO LINKS UPDATED 27/1/08

first_imgOver the next few weeks you will be seeing a lot more multimedia content on Cherwell24. We have hugely expanded our broadcasting team and will be bringing you regular video features and news-in-depth investigations, as well as podcast news roundups.27/1/08Helena Zaba and Rachel Williams present C24’s first gigging and clubbing roundup . Also, see Cherwell24’s first video theatre preview . 24/1/08Our video team further explored the condition of the flooding in Oxford. 13/1/08Our first releases have just been published – a look at busking and the Cornmarket Bagpiper , a report on the soon-to-be closed Greyfriars PPH and ‘Oxford’s Most Haunted ‘, where we go on the hunt for local spooks…We also have a podcast, a roundup of the news over the vac.Happy viewing and check back regularly!C24 Editorial Teamlast_img read more

Continue reading

Indiana casinos likely to remain closed until mid-June

first_img Google+ By Network Indiana – May 12, 2020 0 278 Previous articleMany Hoosier businesses reopening with uncertaintyNext articleFacebook Live event: Guidance on returning to work Network Indiana WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Google+ CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews (Photo supplied/Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians) Casinos in Indiana probably won’t open for at least another month.According to Inside Indiana Business, the Indiana Gaming Commission says casinos are likely to stay closed until at least Mid-June, after the state enters Phase Four of Governor Holcomb’s five-stage plan to slowly re-open.Stage Four is scheduled to start June 14, when bars, clubs, and other entertainment venues can re-open with 50% capacity, while restaurants can offer dine-in service at 75% capacity. That is, if the number of coronavirus deaths and positive cases continue to go down.“The Commission will provide reopening guidelines to Indiana casinos and post opening dates as they are determined,” the IGC said.Like many other businesses around the state, casinos have been closed since the middle of March because of the pandemic, and thousands of casino employees have been furloughed or laid off. WhatsApp Facebook Indiana casinos likely to remain closed until mid-June Pinterest Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

Continue reading

Listen To Umphrey’s McGee Bust Out Toto Cover, Stretch Out ‘Puppet String’ In KC [Full Audio]

first_imgJust two nights ago, Umphrey’s McGee picked up after a couple weeks off to begin an exciting summer tour. Starting at the famed Crossroads KC in Kansas City, MO, Umphrey’s brought some great tunes from their expansive repertoire. The show’s biggest bust out was a cover of “Rosanna” by Toto, which hadn’t been played in 147 shows! They also stretched out “Puppet String” between the second set and encore, leaving time for some great tunes between.Thanks to taper kcmoejoe, we can share full audio from this rocking performance. Check it out below!A full gallery of images from Tara Gracer Design & Photography can be seen below, as well as the All Things Umphrey’s setlist.Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee at The Crossroads, Kansas City, MO – 8/3/2016Set 1: Nipple Trix > Plunger > Slacker, Similar Skin, No Diablo, Miss Tinkle’s Overture, Deeper > RosannaSet 2: Domino Theory, Puppet String > Smell the Mitten, The Linear > Bridgeless, Sociable Jimmy > Booth Love[1]Encore: 2nd Self > Puppet String[1] with Another Brick In the Wall (Pink Floyd) jam Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Continue reading

Portman named Class Day speaker

first_imgAcademy Award-winning actress Natalie Portman ’03 has been selected as the 2015 Class Day speaker for Harvard College. Portman will address the graduating class on May 27, the day before the 364th Commencement.“We are honored to welcome Natalie Portman back to Harvard as our Class Day speaker,” said Class Marshal Megan Prasad ’15, co-chair of the selection committee. “From ‘Black Swan’ to her research in psychology to her work on microfinance initiatives, Portman is not only an inspiring actress but also a committed intellectual and humanitarian. We hope she will share her diverse experiences, both at Harvard and beyond.”Portman has acted in more than 35 feature films, including 11 before she graduated from the College. She won an Oscar for best actress in 2010 for her leading role in “Black Swan.” Most recently, Portman wrote, directed, and acted in “A Tale of Love and Darkness,” which will premiere at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. She has been involved with a number of philanthropic causes, serving as an ambassador of hope for FINCA, a microfinance nonprofit, and as an ambassador for Free The Children.The process of selecting Portman began with a survey of the senior class last fall. A subcommittee of the eight class marshals considers speaker suggestions and extends the invitation.“Through the wide array of her achievements both on and off the screen, Natalie Portman has left an imprint on our cultural consciousness,” said Class Marshal Bob Wu ’15, co-chair of the selection committee. “And as an alumna of the College, she’s uniquely positioned to help us reflect on our experiences over the past four years. We can’t wait to host her later this spring.”The tradition of the senior class inviting a guest speaker to address graduates on Class Day began in 1968. Previously, the honor was given to University affiliates, such as deans, faculty, or classmates. The first invited guest was civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., who accepted the invitation shortly before his assassination. His wife, Coretta Scott King, delivered the speech in his absence and became the first woman to give a Class Day address at Harvard.“Class Day is a moment to celebrate our graduating class and appreciate the community we’ve all built over the past several years at Harvard,” said First Class Marshal Sietse Goffard ’15. “Our goal is to bring every senior together one last time before Commencement to enjoy a day just for us, and we’re looking forward to an especially exciting Class Day this year.”In addition to Portman’s address, Class Day events include award presentations and student orations. The day’s events will take place in Tercentenary Theatre in Harvard Yard beginning at 2 p.m.last_img read more

Continue reading

Finding comfort at home and here

first_imgI joke that I never really became a Californian until coming to Harvard. In many ways I fail to meet the stereotype. I don’t surf, I don’t really like the beach, I’m neither blond nor tan. Yet in my first semester at Harvard, I strove with all my might to adopt a certain coolness and mien that I thought was just Californian enough. I wanted to ensure that people knew where I was from.My freshman fall at Harvard brought me a plethora of new and exciting experiences. I took a course on LGBT literature, something unknown in my conservative, Catholic high school. I established friendships of remarkable depth and breadth, a feat I had not imagined possible in such a short span. I even met a Nobel laureate while walking back to my dorm one day — not a probable occurrence in suburban Orange County, Calif., which I call home.While I was grateful for all that Harvard was giving me, the novelty and unfamiliarity of college made me cling to my Californian identity all the more. The source of this self-categorization is just as clear to me now as it was then. I had homesickness, not a debilitating case but one more latent, hovering always just below my consciousness. The newness of everything, while exhilarating at times, was utterly exhausting at others. The seeming uncertainty of my existence at Harvard — What will I study? Will these new friends be there for me? How do I do this “adulthood” thing? — made me crave the more stable, more predictable life I had left behind.Indeed, I quickly came to miss the things all of us associate with home — friends, family, one’s own bedroom — and the more superficial and yet unique aspects of my home just as much — the palm trees, sunshine, six-lane freeways, my favorite restaurants. I longed for the very feel of life in California, which, as clichéd as it may sound, is indeed radically different from that of Cambridge, with its cold and constant commotion. The very moment I landed at LAX in mid-December after finishing finals, then, brought joy as I returned to familiarity and comfort, to all the things I had missed even if I never thought I would.Yet as break wore on, I found myself becoming more and more frustrated with life at home. Suburbia’s values and pace of life seemed increasingly incompatible with my own. Whether I realized it or not, I had changed so much more in my three months away from home than I could ever expect. The day-to-day of life in Orange County — going to the gym, shopping at the mall, taking a day trip to LA — simply paled in comparison to my newfound academic, extracurricular, and social concerns. It was almost as if home and Harvard were in a race, and the former had failed to keep up. My 21 years in Cambridge Related A Harvard undergrad reflects on both leaving home, and not Moreover, returning for the holidays compelled me to face old demons, uncomfortable aspects of life at home which I had not settled and about which I could simply forget while at school. Time with family showed me I was perhaps not the best son, brother, nephew, cousin, grandson that I could be. While there was a certain comfort in simply being able to pick up relationships with friends where I had left them off, this also meant I had to work through complex emotions and tensions with these same people. And being back in Orange County, even if only for a month or so, left me no choice but to face the conservatism and Catholicism with which I had struggled for so long.The radical differences in environment and matters of personal concern between my lives at Harvard and at home seemed to demand that I adopt a different identity at each locale. In Cambridge, despite the novelty of everything, I was finally gaining confidence and a sense of self-worth I had never possessed before. In Orange County, my life seemed inundated with pedestrian affairs, trapped in the same tormented drama of high school.But as time has progressed and I have now returned home on multiple occasions, the two halves of my once-bifurcated existence have slowly but surely converged. Realizing that one life is easier to lead than two, I have actively attempted to catalyze this process, introducing friends from school to those from home, communicating with all the important people in my life on a regular basis regardless of their or my location. Moreover, the more time I spend at Harvard or at home, I become increasingly aware of how I can improve my life and relationships in the other place. Conversations with peers at school have inspired me to become a better member of my family. FaceTime calls with my best friend across the country have mitigated the academic and social struggles of college.Moreover, each time I return home, I find I am better equipped to fend off boredom, frustration, and those old demons. Though not without plenty of doubt and questioning, my time at Harvard has made me more certain about who I am as a person and what I value. College has made me more aware of where I can grow as a student, citizen, and friend.Dean Rakesh Khurana invites all students to make their four years at Harvard College a “transformative” rather than a “transactional” experience. This, of course, can take many forms — discovering an academic passion, participating in activities for personal rather than career development, etc. I’d like to think, however, that the metamorphic powers of Harvard often penetrate a student as a human being. Of course the varied experiences we students bring to Harvard constitute one of this university’s greatest assets: its diversity. But, in a similar fashion, the growth and knowledge we find at Harvard stick with us as we travel the corners of the Earth to return home during our breaks. At least in my case, Harvard and home are, then, symbiotic. Distance from home, while difficult, has certainly made my heart grow fonder of it. But thanks to Harvard, this distance has also made me so much stronger as well.last_img read more

Continue reading

Office of Housing bans “hoverboards”

first_imgThe Office of Housing sent an email to students Jan. 8 announcing a ban on electronic skateboards, popularly known as “hoverboards,” on campus.“Under the guidance of Campus Safety, the Office of Housing has made the decision to prohibit the use, possession or storage of electronic skateboards including self-balancing boards/scooters and other similar equipment in all undergraduate residence halls and graduate residential communities until safety standards for them have been adequately developed and implemented across all models,” the email stated.The email cited safety concerns, saying that electronic skateboards “present potential fire hazards, particularly but not limited to, the devices’ batteries lighting on fire while charging.“The Consumer Product Safety Commission is actively investigating and testing to address the safety of these devices. Representatives of Student Affairs and Campus Safety will continue to monitor the status of these devices and housing policies will be modified accordingly,” the email stated.A Jan. 9 article by USA Today listed more than 20 colleges and universities that have banned use of electronic skateboards, including the Catholic University of America, University of Connecticut and Georgia State University.Tags: electronic skateboards, hoverboards, Office of Housinglast_img read more

Continue reading

House Committee To Hold Public Hearing On Nursing Home COVID-19 Policies

first_imgPhoto: PixabayCORNING – Congressman Tom Reed announced that the House Ways and Means Health Subcommittee has scheduled a hearing for next Thursday to examine what he says are the “failed” nursing home policies of states and review what recommendations can be implemented moving forward to protect senior citizens.In a recent letter, Reed called for a detailed investigation into New York and other states’ deadly decisions, noting:“As the Committee charged with overseeing Medicare and our nation’s nursing homes, it is critical we investigate how this was allowed to happen, with particular focus on best practices moving forward… the Subcommittee should examine what went wrong in New York so that others might learn from these mistakes and prevent avoidable deaths as this COVID19 crisis continues.”Reed continued, “As public health officials and epidemiologists warn of a potential second wave, we must ensure that our states and nursing homes are better prepared to deal with this threat and keep our seniors safe…By bringing in industry and public health experts, we can, as a Subcommittee, help save lives by highlighting the best practices that need to be implemented by nursing homes across the country.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Continue reading

Two Die In Warren County Crash

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN ImageWARREN – Two people died Sunday afternoon during a crash in Warren County, Pennsylvania.Pennsylvania State Police say 72-year-old Charles Scott and 80-year-old Marcelyn White, both of Pittsfield Pennsylvania, were traveling on State Route 27 when Scott, the driver of a 1976 Dodge Dart, swerved into the oncoming lane to avoid hitting a stopped vehicle.The lane maneuver, police say, caused a Ford F-250 truck heading westbound to crash into the passenger side of Scott’s vehicle.Troopers say both vehicles came to rest off the roadway. White, police say, died at the scene while Scott was flown to UPMC Hamot where he was pronounced dead.The driver and passenger in the truck, a 30-year-old Youngsville man and a 26-year-old North Warren woman, were not injured.last_img read more

Continue reading

Weekly unemployment rates increase slightly

first_imgFor the week of August 7, 2010, there were 678 new regular benefit claims for Unemployment Insurance, an increase of 21 from the week before. Altogether 9,175 new and continuing claims were filed, a decrease of 246 from a week ago and 3,629 fewer than a year earlier. The Department also processed 2,840 First Tier claims for benefits under Emergency Unemployment Compensation, 2008 (EUC08), 11 more than a week ago. In addition, there were 1,591 Second Tier claims for benefits processed under the EUC08 program, which is an increase of 178 from the week before. The Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)last_img read more

Continue reading